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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Defiance in Augusta County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Augusta Stone Church

 
 
Augusta Stone Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 25, 2015
1. Augusta Stone Church Marker
Below this marker is the cornerstone of the church, showing the year, 1747.
Inscription. This, the oldest Presbyterian house of worship in Virginia, is an eloquent memorial to the liberty-loving, god-fearing Scotch-Irish folk who first settled this part of the valley.

Through their arduous labors the building was completed in 1747 and dedicated in 1749 under its first pastor, Dr. John Craig, a native of Northern Ireland. It served also as a fort during the Indian raids which followed Braddock's defeat.

The original walls extend from this spot to the wings in the rear, which were added in 1922.
 
Erected 1937 by Beverley Manor Chapter, D.A.R.
 
Location. 38° 14.295′ N, 78° 58.512′ W. Marker is in Fort Defiance, Virginia, in Augusta County. Marker is on Old Stone Church Lane just west of Lee Highway (U.S. 11), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is on the wall of the church, to the right of the main entrance. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Defiance VA 24437, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Augusta Stone Church (within shouting distance of this marker); The Rev. John Craig (within shouting distance of this marker); Augusta Military Academy
Augusta Stone Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 25, 2015
2. Augusta Stone Church and Marker
Plaque is to the right of the small window on the left.
(about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Willow Spout (approx. 0.4 miles away); Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church (approx. 2.8 miles away); Grandma Moses in Augusta County (approx. 4.2 miles away); Piedmont Battlefield (approx. 4 miles away); Battle of Piedmont (approx. 4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Defiance.
 
Also see . . .  Augusta Stone Presbyterian Church History. “Old Stone Church, as it is now affectionately known, was first remodeled in 1855. The growth of the congregation and the increased enrollment of Augusta Military Academy, whose cadets worshiped in the church from 1865 until the school closed in 1984, made a larger building necessary. Thus, in 1921, transepts were artistically added to the original church building, changing it into its present structure—the form of a cross. The steeple was also added at this time. In 1956 John Craig Hall, the third addition, was built and serves as a fellowship center. The restoration of the sanctuary was initiated and completed in 1968. This remodeling included the rebuilding, enlarging
Augusta Stone Church image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 25, 2015
3. Augusta Stone Church
and moving of the Moller pipe organ to the balcony. The high pulpit and sounding board were also added during this restoration. In 1974 Augusta Stone Church was added to the Virginia and National Landmarks Registers. In 1847 the small stone Session House attached to the north side of the church building was removed and rebuilt in its present location adjacent to the church. During 1975 the Session House was converted into a charming museum which houses items documenting our rich heritage and history.” (Submitted on September 27, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Wars, US Indian
 
American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site No. 84 image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 25, 2015
4. American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site No. 84
Registered by the Presbyterian Historical Society, Philadelphia, Pa.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 27, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 191 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 27, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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