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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Navy Yard in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Willard Park

Washington Navy Yard

 

Panel 2

 
Willard Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 31, 2015
1. Willard Park Marker
Inscription. On display in Willard Park, named for the early 20th century commandant of the Yard, are naval artifacts from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Behind you is the gun mount from the battleship Maine, sunk on the eve of the Spanish-American War, as well as the titanium pressure sphere from the bathyscaphe, Alvin. Mounted throughout the park is a collection of the turn-of-the-century naval ordnance from both American and European manufacturers. The last of the 14-inch railway batteries from World War I is located at the South side of the park. The World War II artifacts include the propeller from the battleship South Dakota and armor plating from American and Japanese warships. West of this location is a 16-inch gun barrel that rests on specially designed trucks that once moved these huge guns about the Yard. Also, west of this location is a modern propeller from an SSBN submarine.
 
Erected by Washington Navy Yard.
 
Location. 38° 52.35′ N, 76° 59.784′ W. Marker is in Navy Yard, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Sicard Street. SE east of Patterson Avenue, SE. Touch for map. Willard Park is south of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy - across Sicard Street, SE; and it extends
Willard Park - viewed to the east from near the marker. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 9, 2015
2. Willard Park - viewed to the east from near the marker.
north-eastward to the "Display Ship" BARRY [formerly, "DD-733"] - at her moorings across the recently constructed Anacostia River Walk since the 1980s. Marker is at or near this postal address: Washington Navy Yard: 10114 "N" Street, SE, Washington DC 20003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Navy Gun Car (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington Navy Yard Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Willard Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Frank W. Crilley Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome Aboard the Display Ship BARRY (DD-993)(sic) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); National Museum of the U.S. Navy (about 400 feet away); "4-in. 40 caliber rifles" (about 500 feet away); U.S. Experimental Model Basin (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Navy Yard.
 
More about this marker. Visitors without military identification may be required to go through additional security screenings, and/or to obtain passes to their destinations.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
"Battleship Propeller" - from USS <i>South Dakota</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 9, 2015
3. "Battleship Propeller" - from USS South Dakota
on display in the southeast corner of Willard Park at the edge of the Navy Yard parking area - with Display Ship Barry in the background at her moorings off the Anacostia River Walk.

 
Categories. War, Spanish-AmericanWar, World IWar, World IIWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 3, 2015, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 264 times since then and 38 times this year. Last updated on October 7, 2015, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on October 4, 2015, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2. submitted on October 5, 2015, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on October 7, 2015, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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