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Fountain Inn in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fairview Church / Fairview Cemetery

 
 
Fairview Church/Fairview Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 6, 2008
1. Fairview Church/Fairview Cemetery Marker
Inscription.
(Front):
Settlers from the Nazareth area of Spartanburg County founded this Presbyterian church in 1786 on land ceded by the Cherokee Indians in the treaty of DeWitt's Corner, 1777. It is said that three buildings, two of logs and one of brick, preceded this 1858 building. The Sunday school annex was built in 1949 and the office-historical building in 1986.

(Reverse):
The oldest marked graves in this cemetery are those of Margaret Alexander, d. 1791, and Elizabeth Alexander, d. 1797. Soldiers of the American Revolution, War of 1812, Civil War, and World Wars I and II are buried here. A special marker denotes the area where blacks were interred.
 
Erected 1986 by Fairview Church Congregation. (Marker Number 23-19.)
 
Location. 34° 38.685′ N, 82° 15.112′ W. Marker is in Fountain Inn, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is at the intersection of Fairview Church Road (County Route 23-451) and Phillips Lane, on the left when traveling west on Fairview Church Road. Touch for map. Marker is located between the church and cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 126 Fairview Church Road, Fountain Inn SC 29644, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 5 miles of
Fairview Church/Fairview Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 6, 2008
2. Fairview Church/Fairview Cemetery Marker
this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tullyton (approx. 2.8 miles away); Cherokee Boundary (1767) (approx. 3½ miles away); Charles G. Garrett Interchange (approx. 3.6 miles away); Battle of Great Cane Brake (approx. 3.8 miles away); Hopkins Farm (approx. 3.8 miles away); Toney's Store / Militia Muster Ground (approx. 3.8 miles away); Cannon Memorial Park Veterans Monument (approx. 4.4 miles away); Old Fountain Inn (approx. 4.4 miles away); Fountain Inn High School (approx. 4½ miles away); Snow Campaign Chapter Marker (approx. 4½ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fountain Inn.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fairview Presbyterian Church. Organized in 1786, Fairview Presbyterian Church is one of the oldest churches in the South Carolina upcountry. (Submitted on September 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Fairview Presbyterian Church (PCA). Official website of Fairview Presbyterian Church. (Submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Pedin Family. Genealogy of the Pedin family, one of the founding families of Fairview Church. (Submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Paden / Peden Family History and Genealogy. (Submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
5. DeWitt's Corner.
Fairview Presbyterian Church Sign image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
3. Fairview Presbyterian Church Sign
Fairview
Presbyterian Church

Founders of Church
Samuel Peden -- James Alexander -- James Nesbit
John Peden -- David Peden
Established 1786
Treaty, 20 May 1777, Treaty ceding all land in SC except small strip in N.W. (modern) Oconee County. (Submitted on September 13, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Treaty of Dewitt's Corner between the Cherokee Nation and South Carolina, 1777. The Treaty of Dewitt’s Corner ended the Cherokee War of 1776-1777, which took place at the beginning of the American Revolution. In 1776, revolutionary South Carolina faced a threat similar to British South Carolina in 1759. (Submitted on September 13, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Fairview Presbyterian Church
Fairview Presbyterian Church was constructed in 1858 and is a white clapboard two-story structure, virtually original.

Exterior
The front façade features a pedimented portico which is supported by five square masonry columns. The columns are ornamented with pointed arch-headed recessed panels. This motif is repeated in a window, located in the center of the pediment. (This window has been painted over.) Two double doors with two panels apiece open directly into the church sanctuary.

The two side facades each feature seven 12/12 shuttered windows. On each side are two doorways opening into stairways leading to the gallery.

The
Fairview Church Sign image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
4. Fairview Church Sign
roof is covered with tin and is pierced at its peak by a brick flue.

The only major alteration was in 1949 when a one-story, white clapboard addition was made at the rear.

Interior
The interior consists of a large central row of pews separated from two narrower rows by side aisles. Extended above each side aisle is a gallery supported by square wooden fluted columns. The walls are covered with flush board siding, and noteworthy interior details include fluting and corner blocks on the window and door jambs, and grained on the pews, doors, and gallery rail.

The original pews and pulpit are still being used, and the pine floors are carpeted only in the aisles.

The only alterations to the interior have been the addition of heating, lighting, and air conditioning, and the enclosing of doors and windows on the pulpit wall.

Significance
Organized in 1786, Fairview Presbyterian Church is one of the oldest churches in the South Carolina upcountry. According to tradition, its founders were immigrants who named Fairview in honor of a church in County Antrim, Ireland.

In 1787, Fairview was enrolled in the South Carolina Presbytery. In 1855, a Sunday school was organized, and by the outbreak of the War Between the States, church membership totaled 129 whites and 19 Negroes.

There have been four church buildings
National Register of Historic Places Medallion image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
5. National Register of Historic Places Medallion
on the present site. According to church records, the third church was brick and was dedicated on August 11, 1818. This church was replaced by the present frame structure, dedicated May 15, 1858.

Fairview’s cemetery is significant in its own right, the oldest graves dating from 1797. There are graves of seven Revolutionary War soldiers, plus those of soldiers in later wars, as well as those of slaves. A fieldstone wall surrounds the cemetery.

The congregation at Fairview continues many of the traditions of the early church. Holy Communion is served to communicants seated on benches at long tables, while offerings are collected on a cloth pouch at the end of a wooden rod.

Throughout its history, Fairview has remained a strong supported of the Presbyterian faith in the upcountry of South Carolina. In 1926, it was claimed that Fairview “…has the proud distinction of being the mother of Presbyterianism in Greenville County, and of many, many churches in other states…”

Architecture
Fairview Presbyterian Church, with its clapboard siding, square columns, and pedimented portico, exemplify the Greek revival style of architecture – a style prevalent in South Carolina church architecture throughout the mid-19th century. Other features of the building, such as the twin entrances under the portico and the side doors which lead
Fairview Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 6, 2008
6. Fairview Presbyterian Church
to the gallery, are also indicative of the meeting house style which frequently influenced rural churches. Original interior features still in use are the pulpit and pews, their feather graining intact. Although a one-story section was added to the rear in 1949, the building’s architectural integrity has been retained. (Source: National Register nomination form.)
    — Submitted July 25, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Fairview Church, Greenville District
The connection of this church with Rev. James Templeton, the halt of whose labors they had enjoyed since 1794, ceased in 1800. They received supplies as a vacant church from John Simpson, James Gilliland, Sr., and William Williamson, until 1802, when they united with the Nazareth Church in a call to Rev. James Gilliland, Jr., with whose labors they were favored through the remainder of this decade. About the year 1809 Alexander Peden, William Peden and Anthony Savage were chosen as elders. (Source: History of the Presbyterian Church in South Carolina by George Howe, pg 137.)
    — Submitted July 25, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. Fairview Church
Following the end of the Revolutionary
Fairview Church - Front Elevation image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 6, 2008
7. Fairview Church - Front Elevation
War, settlers, primarily of Scotch, Scotch-Irish and English descent, migrated from Pennsylvania south along the Great Wagon Road. Establishing their new homes in Upcountry South Carolina, they made their livelihood by farming and trading. In three successive years, not long after their arrival, the citizenry founded the Lebanon Methodist Church (1785), the Fairview Presbyterian Church (1786) and the Reedy River Baptist Church (1787). Thus began a long period of dominance by these three religious groups in the lifestyle of the Upcountry. (Source:Romantic Weekends: Georgia and the Carolinas by Kathy Renouf (2000) pg 383.)
    — Submitted September 27, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.Native AmericansWar of 1812
 
Fairview Church -<br>Detail of Upper Window and Name Plate image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 6, 2008
8. Fairview Church -
Detail of Upper Window and Name Plate
Fairview Church Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
9. Fairview Church Entrance
Fairview Church -<br>Detail of Upper Window and Sign image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
10. Fairview Church -
Detail of Upper Window and Sign
Fairview Cemetery -<br> Surrounded by a Field Stone Wall image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
11. Fairview Cemetery -
Surrounded by a Field Stone Wall
Fairview Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
12. Fairview Cemetery
Fairview Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
13. Fairview Cemetery
Fairview Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
14. Fairview Cemetery
Fairview Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 6, 2008
15. Fairview Cemetery
Fairview Cemetery - Detail of Gate image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
16. Fairview Cemetery - Detail of Gate
Fairview Cemetery Gate image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
17. Fairview Cemetery Gate
Fairview Cemetery Gate Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
18. Fairview Cemetery Gate Marker
Presented
to Fairview Cemetery
by D.D. Peden, Houston, Tex.
Son of Rev. A.C. Peden
Son of David Peden
Son of John Peden
Founder of the Peden Family
Greenville, SC.
A monument dedicated to John Peden is located in the cemetery and shown below. This monument was erected in 1898.
Edward Flanagan Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
19. Edward Flanagan Tombstone
Edward Flanagan
A native of Ternach,
Ireland. He died in
his 81st year, Dec. 21
1868. He was a kind
obliging teacher
and a consistent
member of the
Presbyterian Church.
He left no known
living relatives.
Edward Nash/Lucinda Bell Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
20. Edward Nash/Lucinda Bell Tombstone
Edward Nash
1755-1831
Born in Virginia
Soldier of the Revolution
N.C. Militia
His wife
Lucinda Bell
1755-1836
James A. and Pinkney M. Harrison Tombstones image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
21. James A. and Pinkney M. Harrison Tombstones
Brothers who served in the Civil War.

Pvt
James A Harrison
Co. A
3 SC Inf
CSA
1829
1862

Pvt
Pinkney M Harrison
Co. A
3 SC Inf
CSA
1832
1862
Peden Family Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By B. Jackson
22. Peden Family Monument Marker
John and Margaret Peden
Founders of the Family in S.C.
1760-1899
Born in Ireland
Emigrated to America
Died in Chester, S.C.

Lord Though Hast Been Our Dwelling Place In All Generations. Psalms, 90:1.

This Monument is placed by their grateful descendants gathered from the far and near who are as the sands by the sea shore and the stars of heaven for multitude.

August, 1898

Sons of Peden: James, Thomas, John, William, Samuel, Alexander, David
Peden Family Monument -<br>Southeast Corner image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
23. Peden Family Monument -
Southeast Corner
Peden Family Monument -<br>Northeast Corner image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
24. Peden Family Monument -
Northeast Corner
James S. Peden Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
25. James S. Peden Tombstone
In Memory of
James S. Peden
Son of Robert & Jane Peden,
who fell mortally wounded in
battle near Atlanta on the 22nd
of July 1864. Died in McFerin
Hospital Ga. on the 26th
aged 43 years.
He occupied an enviable position
and was emphatically a good Husband
Son, Citizen, and Soldier.
As a Christian he enjoyed and
reflected that light which shineth more
and more unto the perfect dark
aspiring after a greater degree of
holiness, and in his dying hour
left a testimony worthy a good man.
Bereaved friends hear him as
he would say,
Oh! ye weary ones and lost ones,
Droop not faint not by the way;
Ye shall join the loved and lost ones.
In the land of perfect day. Amen.
Rev. Clark Berry Stewart and Family Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
26. Rev. Clark Berry Stewart and Family Marker
Rev. Clark Berry Stewart
1813-1890
Katherine Carson Hitch
1823-1898
Children
Margaret Amanda Stewart 1845-1913, J. Lewis Stoddard 1833-1921; John Wistar Stewart 1846-1914 Mary Lou Anderson 1844-1882; Isabella Katherine Stewart 1848-1866; Rev. Clavin Lewers Stewart 1851-1921, Lida Frances Todd 1858-1932; Henry Boardman Stewart, M.D. 1855-1947, Martha Eugenia Peden 1858-1936; George Howe Stewart 1857-1857; Nancy Ann Stenhouse Stewart 1858-1913, Adam Stenhouse Peden 1856-1930; Twyman Clark Stewart 1863-1945, Malinda Babb 1867-1918
Grandchildren
Catherine Elizabeth and William Eddie Stoddard; Lelia, Rachel Catherine, and Anderson Hitch Stewart; Henry Todd, Katherine McClintock, and James Clark Stewart; Frennie Fair, Bessie Britt, Allie Amanda, Clifford Calhoun, Mack M. Hoke Howe, Rosa Ross, Calvin Boardman, and David Dantzler Stewart; Bessie Belle, Annie Stewart, and James Clark Peden; Bertha, Ernest, Maude, Ralph Berry, Janie, Albert Thaddeus, Mary Dell, Edwin Clark Stewart.
Rev. Clark Berry Stewart and Family Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
27. Rev. Clark Berry Stewart and Family Marker
Rev. Clark Berry Stewart and Family Marker and Plot image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
28. Rev. Clark Berry Stewart and Family Marker and Plot
Family Physician Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
29. Family Physician Marker
Dedicated
to the memory
of the
Family Physician
Family Physician Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
30. Family Physician Marker
In Memory
of
those who keep the home fires burning
during the doctor's absence on his
errands of mercy.
Donated
by
H.B. Stewart, M.D.
A.D. 1929
Adam Stenhouse Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
31. Adam Stenhouse Tombstone
Sacred
to the memory of
Adam Stenhouse
He died on the 28th of Jany, 1868,
in the 74th year of his age.
He left his native Scotland,
and came to America with his family
in 1820. He was a good neighbor,
indulgent master, trusty friend, kind
father and an affectionate husband.
He was exemplary in all the relations
of life - As a Christian he was humble
and devoted. He served as an Elder
in the Presbyterian Church (Fairview, S.C.)
with commendable zeal fir thirty years.
He lived a life of Faith, died the death
of the righteous and in peace and
tho' dead, yet speaketh as in a voice from
Heaven saying,
"I shine in the light of God,
His image stamps my brow.
Through the shadows of death my feet have trod,
And I reign in glory now.
I have found the joys of Heaven;
I am one of an angel band;
To my head a crown is given,
And a harp is in my hand." Amen.
James A. Woodside M.D. Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
32. James A. Woodside M.D. Tombstone
Sacred
To the Memory of
James A. Woodside M.D.
Born 14th Dec. 1830,
and died 3rd August 1854.
He was the beloved Son of
James & Jane Woodside
of Fairview Church.
He was esteemed and valued
as a Physician,
as a Son he was addectionate
and kind,
As a Brother fond and social,
as a Friend true and cordial.
Many hearts cherish his memory
and mourn his early death.
"Non omnis morian! Multaque pars mei
Vitabit Libitinam."
"Death, Great Proprietor of all! T'is thine
To tread out empire: and to quench the Stars.
Slave Burials Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 12, 2009
33. Slave Burials Marker
Dedicated to the memory of the
(colored) slaves buried here and
elsewhere in unmarked graves
in our sunny southlands.
Stone Urns Frame the Church's Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
34. Stone Urns Frame the Church's Entrance
Stone Urn with Church in Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 5, 2008
35. Stone Urn with Church in Background
The urns sit atop the original stone pillars which sit in pairs at the entrance and exit of the main drive to the church.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,766 times since then and 112 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5. submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on July 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   11. submitted on September 27, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   12, 13, 14. submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   15. submitted on July 25, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   16. submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   17, 18. submitted on September 27, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   19, 20, 21. submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   22. submitted on January 9, 2009, by B. Jackson of Maitland, Florida.   23, 24. submitted on September 27, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   25. submitted on September 30, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31. submitted on September 29, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   32. submitted on September 30, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   33. submitted on September 29, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   34, 35. submitted on October 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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