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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fountain Inn in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Tullyton

 
 
Tullyton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 5, 2008
1. Tullyton Marker
Inscription.
This house was built by T.C. Booling c. 1840 near the old indian boundary. C.B. Stewart minister of nearby Fairview Presbyterian Church lived here 1859-1890.
 
Erected 1993 by Greenville County Historical Preservation Commission. (Marker Number 23-21.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 36.467′ N, 82° 13.967′ W. Marker is near Fountain Inn, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is on Hickory Tavern Road south of County Road 301, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fountain Inn SC 29644, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fairview Church / Fairview Cemetery (approx. 2.8 miles away); Sullivan (Grove) Cemetery (approx. 3.5 miles away); Lebanon Church (approx. 3.7 miles away); Erected by Sullivan - Dunklin Chapter D.A.R. (approx. 3.7 miles away); Dials Methodist Church (approx. 4.3 miles away); Cherokee Boundary (1767) (approx.
Tullyton - 1821 Ruins image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, 1989
2. Tullyton - 1821 Ruins
5.2 miles away); Charles G. Garrett Interchange (approx. 5.2 miles away); Battle of Great Cane Brake (approx. 5.8 miles away); Hopkins Farm (approx. 5.8 miles away); Toney's Store / Militia Muster Ground (approx. 5.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fountain Inn.
 
Regarding Tullyton. The house was in ruins until it was bought and restored. It is currently a private residence. The house is also known as the Bolling-Stewart House and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is a fine example of Greek Revival architecture in South Carolina.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tullyton. The house and ruins at Tullyton are significant as surviving examples of early nineteenth-century brick construction in rural upcountry South Carolina. (Submitted on September 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. South Carolina Plantations: Tullyton. Located on Fairview Road, three miles south of Fairview Church Road, named for Tully F. Sullivan, an early owner. (Submitted on October 19, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
Tullyton - 1821 Ruins image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, 1989
3. Tullyton - 1821 Ruins
1. Tullyton - National Register Nomination Form
The Tullyton complex is located in rural lower Greenville County near Fountain Inn. The contributing resources are two, two-story load bearing brick buildings built in c. 1821 and c. 1839 as a residence/commercial structure and a residence, respectively. The c. 1821 building is partially in ruin, without a roof and windows, but the c. 1839 building is in good repair and is a good example of late Federal-early Greek Revival architecture. Both are rare examples of early nineteenth century brick construction in the South Carolina upcountry.

Additional Information
The c. 1839 building is a two-story, load bearing, masonry structure with a lateral-gable roof. The brick is laid in a five-course American bond with a projecting stuccoed masonry base under the watertable molding. Projecting from the east facade is a subsequent lateral-gable screened-in porch. One-story, two-bay, lateral0gable, frame addition with clapboard siding is located on the west facade. All windows are double-hung sash with stuccoed jack arch lintels. The first floor has nine-over-nine sashes; the second floor has nine-over-six sashes; and the attic story has six-over-six sashes.

The identical north and south facades are five bays with central entry on the first floor and a tripartite window on the second
Tullyton - 1821 Ruins image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, 1989
4. Tullyton - 1821 Ruins
floor. The entries have single doors with transom-lights and double-hung sash sidelights. They presently have simple modern one-story gable porticoes are visible but no remaining descriptions are known to exist. An early twentieth century photograph shows a cantilever overhang over the north facade.

The interior reveals a central hall plan. The transverse hall is flanked by two rooms on either side. The structure's modest woodwork is intact, including its pegged mortise-and-tenon-joined stair handrail. The southwest corner room on the second floor, intended for accommodating passersby, is accessed by a separate stair from the [resent-day kitchen. The attic is framed with timber rafters, sequentially marked with Roman numerals, and hewn flat on the tops.

The c. 1821 ruin is a five-course American bond, two-story, brick shall on a stone foundation. The roof and floors have been removed and a section of the second story wall has collapsed but the opening pattern is evident and the chimneys still stand. The east or primary facade had an asymmetrical arrangement of a single door flanked on either side by one window on the first story and four windows on the second story. A massive two-shouldered chimney, with a first-story setback and full width base, dominates the north wall.

Noncontributing buildings and structures on the property are a wellhouse, shed,
Tullyton - 1839 House image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, 1989
5. Tullyton - 1839 House
and garage.

Significance
The house and ruins at Tullyton, near Fountain in southern Greenville County, are significant as surviving examples of early nineteenth-century brick construction in rural upcountry South Carolina. This section of the state (present-day Anderson, Cherokee, Greenville, Oconee, Pickens, and Spartanburg Counties) developed slowly until the period c. 1840-c. 1860, when upcountry cotton became the mainstay of the economy. There were few brick residences built in this area before c. 1840; most brick construction was for public or commercial buildings. The house and ruins at Tullyton are some of the few early brick buildings in this area which are extant. The ruins of a c. 1821 house are adjacent to a c. 1839 house, which is also significant as a particularly late federal-early Greek Revival-influenced residence. The c. 1821 house also served the community as a post office/store.

The c. 1821 house was owned by T.F. Sullivan and Company, a cotton-and-mercantile-trading company. The first postmaster of the Tullyton post office was Tully F. Sullivan, owner of the company, who served 1821-1826. Micajah Berry, a partner in the company, served as postmaster 1826-1860 and 1837-1848. When T.F. Sullivan and Company dissolved by 1834, Berry and Thaddeus C. Colling, a third partner, established Berry and Bolling. The c. 1839 house was built by
Tullyton - 1839 House image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, 1989
6. Tullyton - 1839 House
Bolling, who was the last postmaster at Tullyton, serving for a few months before the post office was discontinued in 1848. Bolling sold the property to the Reverend Clark B. Stewart in 1859. Stewart served as minister of nearby Fairview Presbyterian Church from 1855 to 1883 as as a missionary to hospitalized Confederate soldiers in Virginia. He also took great interest in farming techniques in later life and contributed several articles to agricultural journals such as the Southern Cultivator. Reverend Stewart lived here until his death in 1890. The house and some of the property remained in Reverend Stewart's family until 1942, when his granddaughter, Catherine Stewart Peden, sold the property.
    — Submitted October 19, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Private Gate Leading to Tullyton image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 5, 2008
7. Private Gate Leading to Tullyton
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,217 times since then and 272 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 19, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on July 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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