Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Moran in Teton County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

A Changing Landscape

 
 
A Changing Landscape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 25, 2015
1. A Changing Landscape Marker
Inscription.
Alterations to a natural lake
Jackson Lake is the largest of the park’s many lakes formed by glaciers. The lake expanded when the Bureau of Reclamation built a dam in 1907, creating a reservoir on top of a natural lake. The water behind the dam provides irrigation water to communities in Idaho through the Minidoka Project.

Jackson Lake Dam allows the Bureau of Reclamation to manage the lake’s water level. Sometimes, they keep the level low to capture meltwater. Other times, the level is low due to lack of precipitation.

Lake levels and climate change
The water level of Jackson Lake varies from year to year due to seasonal precipitation amounts, winter snowpack, and irrigation demands. In some years the reservoir may start completely full of meltwater from winter’s deep snow but end the summer nearly empty, drained to meet water needs downstream.

The National Park Service is committed to reducing its contributions to climate change through conserving energy and water, promoting alternative transportation, constructing green buildings, and minimizing waste.

Enhancing the Natural Resource
Jackson Lake Dam increased the lake’s capacity by 30 percent and raised the water level nearly 40 feet. Reservoir levels vary, however the natural lake is always full.

Climate change affects
A Changing Landscape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 25, 2015
2. A Changing Landscape Marker
glaciers, too. Research indicates that the park’s glaciers have receded significantly in the last 100 years.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 43° 54.184′ N, 110° 38.624′ W. Marker is in Moran, Wyoming, in Teton County. Marker can be reached from Colter Bay Marina Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in Grand Teton National Park, on the deck in the back of the Colter Bay Visitor Center. Marker is in this post office area: Moran WY 83013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Art of Making Mountains (here, next to this marker); John Colter (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Bold Trappers (approx. 1.8 miles away); Stephen Leek's Camera Conservation (approx. 1.9 miles away); Grand Teton National Park (approx. 3.7 miles away); A New Era (approx. 3.7 miles away); Jackson Lake Lodge (approx. 3.8 miles away); Young, Restless, and Still Rising (approx. 4.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Moran.
 
More about this marker. Photographs of Jackson Lake during a period of high water and low water appear near the top of the marker. Below this is a map showing the outline of Jackson
Marker in Grand Teton National Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 25, 2015
3. Marker in Grand Teton National Park
Lake before the dam was built and the outline today. A picture on the right side of the marker shows how the Teton glacier has reduced in size from 1929 to 2006.
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 9, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 192 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 9, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
Paid Advertisement