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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Buford in Albany County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Pyramid on the Plains

 
 
Pyramid on the Plains Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 8, 2015
1. Pyramid on the Plains Marker
Captions (right side, top to bottom): H.H. Richardson, architect; Granite from Reeds Rock was shaped into blocks to construct the Monument; Monument during construction; Oakes Ames; $20 Double Eagle; Augustus Saint-Gaudens, sculptor.
Inscription. At first glance, the Ames Monument may seem out of place on this high, wind-swept setting. If you step back and view the Monument from a distance, you will notice its design and shape mimic the surrounding features of the mountain landscape. The Union Pacific spared no expense in constructing the Ames Monument, contracting the most renowned architect, builder, and sculptor of the time.

An Architectural Achievement
Henry Hobson Richardson, one of the most prominent architects of the time, designed the massive stone Monument. He is well known for a variety of structures in Boston, Pittsburgh, Chicago, and other cities. The four-sided, ashlar pyramid is constructed of native granite. The monument is Richardson's only work west of St. Louis, and has been described as one of the architect's least known, but best works.

Monumental Task
Norcross Brothers of Worcester, Massachusetts were contracted to build the Monument at a cost of $65,000. Construction took place between 1880-1882 using granite that was quarried from Reeds Rock, located a half-mile west of the Monument. During the project, construction superintendent A.L. Sutherland and 85 workers lived on-site in the town of Sherman. Draft animals were used to skid the mammoth stones, which weigh up to 20 tons apiece, from the quarry. Wooden cranes
Pyramid on the Plains Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 8, 2015
2. Pyramid on the Plains Marker
This marker is on the left.
were used to hoist the large stones into place.

Bas-relief Medallions
The famous sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, designed the bas-relief medallions of the Ames brothers. He is well known for his design of the $20 Double Eagle coin and the numerous monuments he created to commemorate Civil War heroes. Inset into the granite along the Monument's north side are one-foot-high letters proclaiming, "In Memory of Oakes Ames and Oliver Ames."
 
Erected by Wyoming State Parks and Cultural Resources.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Transcontinental Railroad marker series.
 
Location. 41° 7.858′ N, 105° 23.876′ W. Marker is near Buford, Wyoming, in Albany County. Marker is on Monument Road near Hermosa Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 Monument Road, Buford WY 82052, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Transcontinental Railroad (here, next to this marker); Ames Monument (here, next to this marker); Old Sherman Cemetery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Lonetree on the Laramie Range (approx.
The Bas-relief Medallion of Oakes Ames by Augustus Saint-Gaudens image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 8, 2015
3. The Bas-relief Medallion of Oakes Ames by Augustus Saint-Gaudens
2.7 miles away); Tree in the Rock (approx. 2.7 miles away); Tree Rock (approx. 2.7 miles away); Sherman Mountains (approx. 2.7 miles away); The Purple Heart Trail (approx. 7.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Buford.
 
More about this marker. The Ames Monument is about 16 miles east of Laramie. The Monument is accessed by taking the Vedauwoo exit (Exit 329) off of Interstate 80.
 
Categories. Man-Made Features
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 15, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 211 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 15, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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