Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Thick of the Battle

 
 
Thick of Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Thick of Battle Marker
Inscription. 4:00 - 4:30 p.m. July 9, 1864

The Battle of Monocacy changed from a stalemate to a rout as the final lines of Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon's three Confederate brigades swept down Brooks Hill onto the fields of Thomas farm. Both sides traded blistering gunfire around the Thomas house and outbuildings and along the ridge toward the Monocacy River. Numerous soldiers and officers lay dead or wounded on the fields and in the streams. Running low on ammunition, Union troops fell back to the Georgetown Pike (today's Route 355) and toward the Gambrill Mill area as Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace gave the order to retreat. Meanwhile, across the river, Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early's troops under Maj. Gen. Stephen D. Ramseur drove back a small Federal force across the railroad bridge.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield
National Parks Service.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 39° 21.434′ N, 77° 23.471′ W. Marker was near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker was on Baker Valley Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at stop four of the auto-tour of Monocacy Battlefield. This marker set is at the trail head for the Thomas Farm walking tour. Marker was in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Thomas Farm Tour Stop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. Thomas Farm Tour Stop
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Thomas Farm (here, next to this marker); Federal Retreat (a few steps from this marker); Final Attack (within shouting distance of this marker); Civilians Under Siege (within shouting distance of this marker); Gordonís Decisive Attack (approx. ľ mile away but has been reported missing); Final Stand (approx. 0.3 miles away); Clustered Spires of Frederick (approx. half a mile away); History of the Monocacy River Valley (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker is a "bird's eye" view of the battle area with labels indicating important locations on the battlefield.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Monocacy. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Fields of Thomas Farms image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 26, 2007
3. Fields of Thomas Farms
Looking to the west from the Thomas Farm, Confederates and Federals fought across these fields in the afternoon of July 9, 1864 and decided the battle of Monocacy. Although the Federal units were mixed up during the action, Rickett's Division defending here had a brigade under Colonel William S. Truex on the left (closest to the camera) and another under Colonel Matthew R. McClennan on the right (centered on the tree line in the middle of the fields).

Note the shadows of the silo on the ground, and compare to the next photo's view of the silo. The distance to the far tree line, where US Interstate 270 crosses the Monocacy, is just over half a mile.
The Thomas Farm seen from the West image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 26, 2007
4. The Thomas Farm seen from the West
From a point near modern U.S. Interstate 270, this view looks back to the Thomas Farm. The Confederate battle line in the final phases of the battle advanced from the right side of view, against the Federals on the left. The Confederate cavalry under Brig. Gen. John McCausland made two unsuccessful attacks on the Federal lines before Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon's Confederate Division arrived in position. Gordon's division arrayed from east (closest to the camera) to west - Brig. Gen. William Terry's (Stonewall) Brigade, Brig. Gen. Zubelon York's (Louisiana) Brigade, and Brig. Gen. Clement Evans (Georgia) Brigade.

Placing the point of view in perspective, photo number 3 in this set was taken near the silo of the barn in the distance.
The Pennsylvania Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
5. The Pennsylvania Monument
Costing $8,000 in 1908, this monument is dedicated to the 67th, 87th, and 138th Pennsylvania Regiments. The monument is located at the intersection of Araby Church and Baker Valley Roads. The 138th Regiment held a position on the center of the Federal lines for a major part of the day. The 87th was engaged on the right side of the line closer to the Thomas Farm. Later, both regiments were part of the final Federal defensive line formed along this road in the late afternoon. While memorialized here, the 67th Regiment actually was held up at New Market, MD, about five miles to the west throughout the day.
Thick of the Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 6, 2010
6. Thick of the Battle Marker
View to the west towards Brooks Hill
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,701 times since then and 46 times this year. Last updated on October 26, 2015, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on February 22, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement