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Elmira in Chemung County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Gettysburg Address

 
 
The Gettysburg Address Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
1. The Gettysburg Address Monument
Inscription.
Address by President Lincoln
at the dedication of
The Gettysburg National Cemetery
November 19, 1863

          Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
          Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
          But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause
The Gettysburg Address Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
2. The Gettysburg Address Monument
for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
 
Location. 42° 6.651′ N, 76° 49.667′ W. Marker is in Elmira, New York, in Chemung County. Marker is on Davis Street, in the median. Touch for map. Monument is located near the center drive of Woodlawn National Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1200 Walnut Street, Elmira NY 14905, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Shohola Railroad Accident Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Woodlawn National Cemetery (about 300 feet away); A National Cemetery System (about 300 feet away); Confederate Burials (about 300 feet away); Confederate Soldiers Memorial (about 400 feet away); Confederate Burials in the National Cemetery (about 400 feet away); John W. Jones Museum (approx. 0.3 miles away); Augustus W. Cowles (approx. 0.3 miles away); Mark Twain (approx. 0.3 miles away); Veterans of All Wars (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Elmira.
 
Also see . . .
1. Gettysburg Address
The Gettysburg Address Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
3. The Gettysburg Address Monument
. The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known in American history. It was delivered by Lincoln during the American Civil War, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg. (Submitted on October 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Library of Congress: Gettysburg Address Exhibit. Abraham Lincoln was the second speaker on November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. Lincoln was preceded on the podium by the famed orator Edward Everett, who spoke to the crowd for two hours. Lincoln followed with his now immortal Gettysburg Address. (Submitted on October 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 155 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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