Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Santiago de Querétaro in Municipality of Querétaro, Querétaro, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Manuel de la Peña y Peña

Final Ratification of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo

 
 
Manuel de la Peña y Peña Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 27, 2015
1. Manuel de la Peña y Peña Marker
Inscription.
En esta casa el 30 de mayo de 1848,
el Presidente de la República, Lic. D.
Manuel de la Peña y Peña
autorizó con su firma el Tratado de Paz
con los Estados Unidos de Norte America
Comisión Local de Turismo - 1947

English translation:
In this house on May 30, 1848,
the President of the Republic
Manuel de la Peña y Peña
signed the Treaty of Peace
with the United States of North America
Local Tourism Commission - 1947

 
Erected 1947 by Comisión Local de Turismo.
 
Location. 20° 35.62′ N, 100° 23.712′ W. Marker is in Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro, in Municipality of Querétaro. Marker is on 29 Miguel Hidalgo. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76000, Mexico.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Benjamin N. Velasco Military Institute (within shouting distance of this marker); Alley of Matamoros (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Tribute to Juan Antonio de Urrutia y Arana (about 90 meters away); Last Prison of Maximilian (about 90 meters away); Temple of the Ex-Convent of Santa Clara de Jesus
Manuel de la Peña y Peña Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 27, 2015
2. Manuel de la Peña y Peña Marker
The marker is to the left of the main door of the building.
(about 210 meters away); Vicente Guerrero (about 210 meters away); Vicente Guerrero Garden (about 210 meters away); Del Carmen Temple and Convent (about 210 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santiago de Querétaro.
 
Regarding Manuel de la Peña y Peña. The Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo ending the Mexican-American War was initially negotiated and signed on February 2, 1848. The U.S. Congress then further modified the treaty and it was finally ratified on May 30, 1848 in this house by Mexican President de la Peña y Peña. Interestingly, the final treaty makes no mention of Texas or the boundary dispute that the U.S. had used as a provocation to start the war. The war had lasted almost two years and saw Mexico lose almost 55% of her territory. The U.S. gained all or parts of 10 future states at the cost of some 13,000 dead and the payment of $15 million to Mexico.
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, Mexican-American
 
Manuel de la Peña y Peña image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 1, 2015
3. Manuel de la Peña y Peña
This portrait from ca. 1850 by an unknown artist can be seen at the Museo Nacional de Historia (National History Museum) at Chapultepec Castle, Mexico City, Mexico.
Instituto Guadalupano additional marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 27, 2015
4. Instituto Guadalupano additional marker
This marker to the right of the door reads, "Casa que ocupo el Instituto Guadalupano hasta el año de 1814. Posteriormente Colegio Anaya. Sus discipulos dedican este homenaje a su Fundador y Director Señor Profesor Don Manuel C. Anaya en el cuadragesivo aniversario de su muerte, 4 de noviembre de 1959. (Guadalupe Institute until 1814, later The Anaya School. The former students dedicate this tribute to the Founder and Director Professor Manuel C. Anaya on the 40th anniversary of his death, November 4, 1959).
Table used in the final ratification of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 26, 2017
5. Table used in the final ratification of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.
This 18th century table, used to sign the final ratification of the treaty is now at the Querétaro Regional Museum in the ex-convent of San Francisco in downtown Querétaro.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 228 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 4, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   4. submitted on November 12, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   5. submitted on May 26, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
Paid Advertisement