Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Gambrill House

 
 
Gambrill House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Gambrill House Marker
Inscription. James H. Gambrill prospered as a miller after the Civil War, and the family moved up in the world - from a modest dwelling on the lowlands near the mill to this 17-room house on the hill. The three-story frame structure, built about 1872, has mansard roof and central tower distinctive of Second Empire mansions. From their elegant new home, called Edgewood, the Gambrills had excellent views of their milling and farming operations, the City of Frederick, and the Catoctin Mountains.

(Sidebar): Historic Preservation Training Center
The Gambrill building now houses the National Park Service's Historic Preservation Training Center. The center is dedicated to the preservation and maintenance of historic structures of the National Park Service and its partners by demonstrating outstanding leadership in preservation education and skills and crafts development.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 39° 22.023′ N, 77° 23.19′ W. Marker was near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker could be reached from Urbana Pike (State Highway 355), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located along a walking trail at the Gambrill Mill (stop five on the driving tour of Monocacy Battlefield), which
Location of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. Location of Marker
on a lane off the right side (east) of Urbana Pike. The marker is located between Gambrill House and Gambrill Mill along the trail. Marker was in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Edgewood (within shouting distance of this marker); Monocacy Battlefield (within shouting distance of this marker); A Bold Plan (within shouting distance of this marker); Gambrill Mill (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Monocacy National Battlefield (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Monocacy National Battlefield (about 300 feet away); Retreat (about 700 feet away); Burning the Bridge (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. The background on the marker is a photograph of Gambrill House as it looks today. The sidebar contains three photographs. The upper left sidebar photo shows "A skilled Historic Preservation Training Center carpenter mak[ing] repairs to a wooden cornice bracket." The upper right sidebar photo is "A master mason inspect[ing] the pointing on the scarp wall during a preservation project at historic Fort Monroe in Hampton, Virginia." The lower photograph in the sidebar shows "The Historic
Gambrill House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. Gambrill House
Preservation Training Center Carpentry Team, comprised of trainees and skilled preservation trades instructors, takes a break from a preservation project at Harpers Ferry National Historic Park."
 
Also see . . .
1. Gambrill House. National Parks Service site detailing the history of the house. (Submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Gambrill House - Mansion of the Second Empire Victorian style. (Submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
A View of Gambrill House and Grounds image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 29, 2007
4. A View of Gambrill House and Grounds
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,534 times since then and 68 times this year. Last updated on November 11, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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