Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Palo Alto in Santa Clara County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

The Crossroads of Mayfield

 
 
The Crossroads of Mayfield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 20, 2015
1. The Crossroads of Mayfield Marker
Click on photo to view historical photos displayed on marker.
Inscription. Long before Stanford University and the City of Palo Alto existed, this area of the Mexican land grant, Rancho Rincon de San Francisquito Creek was a crossroads of travel and commerce. In the 1850's, it would take Juana Briones three days to travel in a wooden cart from here to San Francisco to deliver cattle hides. In the dry season, the route was through the flat lands (roughly following the current El Camino Real), but in the rainy season, creek crossings higher in the foothills were used. On early maps, El Camino Real was called "County Road" and then "State Highway" until about 1926.

In 1856, Jesus Ramos farmed the land across Page Mill Road from these playing fields. By 1866, William Page had timber acreage and a sawmill near the present Portola Redwoods State Park. Wagons brought freshly sawn lumber down Page Mill Road to his lumber business in Mayfield."
 
Location. 37° 25.406′ N, 122° 8.582′ W. Marker is in Palo Alto, California, in Santa Clara County. Marker is on El Camino Real (State Highway 82), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located at the parking lot of the Stanford – Palo Alto Community Playing Fields located at the corner of Page Mill Road and El Camino Real. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2634 El Camino Real, Palo Alto CA 94306, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Crossroads of Mayfield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 20, 2015
2. The Crossroads of Mayfield Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Play Ball! (here, next to this marker); Town and Gown (within shouting distance of this marker); Mayfield School (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Uncle Jimís Cabin (approx. 0.2 miles away); Herring Box School (approx. ľ mile away); a different marker also named Herring Box School (approx. ľ mile away); Homesite of Sarah Wallis (approx. 0.9 miles away); Juana Briones Park (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Palo Alto.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Meeting on the Corner: The Beginning of Mayfield's End. Plagued by money problems, bad roads and little leadership, a group of residents began an effort in 1918 for Mayfield to be annexed by Palo Alto. (Submitted on November 23, 2015.) 

2. How is the Historical City Mayfield Related to Palo Alto?. Mayfield is the reason Palo Alto has two downtown centers, California and University. The story of Palo Alto is intertwined with Mayfield. So much so, that Mayfield is the reason Palo Alto exists. (Submitted on November 23, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable Places
 
Three Markers image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 20, 2015
3. Three Markers
This marker is seen in the background. The Mayfield School marker is seen in the center and the Town and Gown marker is seen in the foreground.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 23, 2015, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 153 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 23, 2015, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.
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