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Ticonderoga in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Ticonderoga

Historic New York

 
 
Historic New York Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July /11/2008
1. Historic New York Marker
Inscription. During the 18th century, when nations fought to control the strategic route between the St. Lawrence River in Canada and the Hudson River to the south, the fortification overlooking the outlet of Lake George into Lake Champlain was called “the key to a continent.”

The French constructed here in 1755 the stronghold they named Carillon, and made it a base to attack their English rivals. In 1758, Carillon, under Marquis de Montcalm, withstood assault by superior British forces. The next year Jeffery Amherst’s troops captured Carillon and forced the French to retreat from Lake Champlain. The British renamed the fortress Fort Ticonderoga.

During the American Revolution, Ethan Allen and his Green Mountain Boys captured Ticonderoga in a surprise attack, May 10, 1775. Cannon hauled from Ticonderoga to Boston helped George Washington drive the British from that city. In July, 1777, General Burgoyne’s invading army overwhelmed the American fort, and Ticonderoga again became British. Americans unsuccessfully attacked the fort in September, 1777; later the British abandoned it.

In 1816, William Ferris Pell acquired the fort. His descendants began its restoration and in 1909 opened Ticonderoga to the public. Now the Fort Ticonderoga Association maintains the historic fort and its military museum.
 
Erected
Marker at Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
2. Marker at Fort Ticonderoga
Marker is located near the entrance to Fort Ticonderoga, on the shore of Lake Champlain.
1967 by New York State Education Department.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Historic New York marker series.
 
Location. 43° 50.539′ N, 73° 23.343′ W. Marker is in Ticonderoga, New York, in Essex County. Marker is on Sandy Redoubt, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in the picnic area near the entrance to Fort Ticonderoga off Route 74. Marker is in this post office area: Ticonderoga NY 12883, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Carillon (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Colonel John Brown (about 400 feet away); Gen. Henry Knox Trail (about 500 feet away); 200th Anniversary of Washington’s Inspection (about 500 feet away); 150th Anniversary of the Capture of This Fort (about 500 feet away); Through this entrance . . . (about 500 feet away); Colonel Ethan Allen (about 500 feet away); Troops of Colonial Wars at Ticonderoga (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ticonderoga.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Ticonderoga National Historic Landmark. (Submitted on July 12, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesMilitaryWar, French and IndianWar, US Revolutionary
 
Fort Ticonderoga Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
3. Fort Ticonderoga Marker
Entrance to Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
4. Entrance to Fort Ticonderoga
Many famous historical people have passed through this entrance. These include George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Benedict Arnold, Ethan Allen, the Marquis de Moltcalm, Sir John Burgoyne and Henry Knox, among others.
Defenses of Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
5. Defenses of Fort Ticonderoga
Fort Ticonderoga boasts a huge collection of Revolutionary War artillery. These 24-pounders look out from the fort's SW bastion.
Fort Ticonderoga Parade Grounds image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
6. Fort Ticonderoga Parade Grounds
Daily activities, such as inspections, drilling and general orders took place in the fort's parade grounds.
Fort Ticonderoga Reenactment image. Click for full size.
By S B
7. Fort Ticonderoga Reenactment
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 12, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 3,283 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 12, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on February 20, 2012, by S B of Sacramento, California.
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