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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Stonewall in Gillespie County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Longhorn Cattle and White-Tail Deer

 
 
Longhorn Cattle and White-Tail Deer Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
1. Longhorn Cattle and White-Tail Deer Marker
Inscription.

Why do we keep these animals in this enclosure?

A small herd of Longhorns and White-tail deer are kept in this pasture so our visitors can view these prominent icons of Texas.

Longhorn Cattle

“Someone has said that civilization follows the plow. West of the Missouri, the plow followed the cowboy, and the cowboy followed the Longhorn from Texas ...”
J. Frank Dobie


Spanish Retinto (Criollo) cattle started arriving in Texas by the 1520's by explorers and some escaped or were abandoned. When the English settlers started arriving in the 1830's, some of their cattle escaped or were abandoned also. The now wild herds found each other and the Texas Longhorn emerged. This new breed survived by their cross-bred ability to thrive on marginal rangeland.

After the Civil War, a sagging Texas economy and a big demand for beef up north made the Texas Longhorn a valuable resource. Did you know LBJís grandfather and uncle, Samuel and Tom Johnson, had a cattle driving business based not far from here.

The Texas Longhorn is truly a Texas original!

White-Tail Deer

The white-tail deer is a long-legged, fast moving mammal. It stands about three and one-half feet high at the shoulder. Only the males (Bucks) have branched
Deer Antler Growing Calendar image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
2. Deer Antler Growing Calendar
antlers which are shed, then regrown each year. The common colors are either a light dusty brown or gray with a white belly and tail underside. The young (Fawns) are born in May and June. When the female (Doe) gives birth, she hides her young and only returns to feet it then moves away. This behavior can give the impression that the fawn is an orphan when indeed it is not. Please take a moment and observe the brush in front of you. White-tail deer are known to be shy, but curious. Listen for snorting sounds: Itís the deerís way of trying to get you to move so they can see you better.


To learn more about deer antlers and how they grow, look at the Antler Growing Calendar sign behind you in the wooden shelter.
 
Location. 30° 14.28′ N, 98° 37.45′ W. Marker is near Stonewall, Texas, in Gillespie County. Marker can be reached from Park Road 52 0.2 miles north of U.S. 290. Touch for map. Marker is located on the northwest side of the enclosed viewing pasture (600 feet east of the visitor center) in Lyndon B. Johnson State Park and Historic Site; the above directions are to the main entrance to the visitor center parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Stonewall TX 78671, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Farm History (about 500 feet away, measured
Longhorn Cattle and White-Tail Deer Marker Exhibit image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
3. Longhorn Cattle and White-Tail Deer Marker Exhibit
in a direct line); Sauer-Beckmann Living History Farm (about 500 feet away); Within These Walls / Small Spaces, Many Faces (about 500 feet away); What is the President pointing to anyway? (about 500 feet away); A Grand Entrance (about 600 feet away); The Texas White House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Friendship Stones (approx. 0.2 miles away); Low Water Crossing (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stonewall.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lyndon B. Johnson State Park & Historic Site - Official Website. (Submitted on November 27, 2015.)
2. Longhorn Cattle. From the Texas State Historical Associationís “Handbook of Texas Online”. (Submitted on November 27, 2015.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureAnimals
 
Viewing Pasture next to Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
4. Viewing Pasture next to Marker
A Texas Longhorn in the Viewing Pasture image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
5. A Texas Longhorn in the Viewing Pasture
The "Dash J Dash" Brand image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
6. The "Dash J Dash" Brand
Close-up of graphic on marker
Marker Exhibit as viewed from Nature Trail image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
7. Marker Exhibit as viewed from Nature Trail
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 27, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 212 times since then and 53 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 27, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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