Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Higginsville in Lafayette County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Confederate States of America - National Flags

 
 
Confederate States of America - National Flags Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 11, 2015
1. Confederate States of America - National Flags Marker
Inscription.

Stars and Bars Flag
Adopted in March 1861, the Stars and Bars was the first national flag officially used by the Confederate States of America (CSA). Seven stars represented each of the seven original states of the CSA. The flag gained stars as more states seceded from the Union until a total of 13 appeared on the flag. The last two stars represented Kentucky and Missouri, whose secessionist governments-in-exile were recognized by the Confederate Congress as the legitimate governments of those states and were accordingly admitted to the Confederacy.

Stainless Banner Flag
The Confederate Stars and Bars flag became unpopular with Southerners. As the war continued, Southern people identified less with the old Union and its symbols. They felt that the Stars and Bars flag was too similar to the old Stars and Stripes. They wanted a completely different kind of flag. In response, the Confederate Congress adopted a new national flag on May 1, 1863. This flag incorporated a "stainless" white field with the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia as its canton. However, this second national flag also caused problems because of its excessive white color, which easily became soiled. More importantly, the flag's large white field could (and sometimes was) mistaken, especially at sea, for a flag of surrender.

Third

Markers at Confederate Memorial State Historic Site Cemetery Entrance image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
2. Markers at Confederate Memorial State Historic Site Cemetery Entrance
National Flag
The Confederate States of American [sic] adopted their third and final national flag on March 4, 1865. A red vertical bar on the fly solved the problem of confusing this flag with a surrender flag. Only a few of these flags were issued and flown. Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to Gen. U.S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse on April 9, 1865. Other Southern commanders surrendered their armies shortly afterward.
 
Erected 2014 by Missouri State Parks.
 
Location. 39° 5.916′ N, 93° 43.772′ W. Marker is near Higginsville, Missouri, in Lafayette County. Marker is on 1st Street 0.4 miles from Business Missouri Route 13, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is just inside the cemetery entrance at the Confederate Memorial State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Higginsville MO 64037, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Our Confederate Dead (here, next to this marker); Confederate Memorial State Historic Site (a few steps from this marker); Confederate States of America - Battle Flags (a few steps from this marker); Lion of Lucerne (a few steps from this marker); Confederate Home Chapel Restoration (a few steps from this marker); Cottage Row [and] The Confederate Home Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); The Confederate Home of Missouri (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Soldiers' Monument (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Higginsville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Confederate Memorial State Historic Site MO. (Submitted on November 28, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. A Brief History of the Confederate Flags. (Submitted on November 28, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Civil War Flags. (Submitted on November 28, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 28, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 143 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 28, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
Paid Advertisement