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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Stonewall in Gillespie County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Junction School

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park

 
 
The Junction School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
1. The Junction School Marker
Inscription. Lyndon Baines Johnson first came to this school as a four-year-old in knee breeches and a collar. Here, surrounded by 30 students spanning seven grades, he received his first formal education. The future president attended the Junction School for just a few months. But for him, its crowded classroom, simple style, and sparse supplies always symbolized the hardships of education in America.

A half century after leaving, Johnson returned. With his first teacher, Miss Kate Deadrich, at his side, he signed into law one of the most important education bills of the 20th century. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act redefined the Federal governmentís relationship with Americaís schools.

On April 11, 1965, President Johnson signed the bill that committed more than $1.5 billion in Federal funds to Americaís schools; it was one of more than 60 education bills he signed during his presidency. Said Johnson, “I believe deeply that no law I have signed or will ever sign means more to the future of America.”

(Upper Right Photo Caption)
Children play on the schoolís basketball court, about 1916. Though only four when he attended the school in 1912, Lyndon Johnson loved elbowing his way into ballgames with children much older than he.
 
Erected by
The Junction School image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
2. The Junction School
View to north from Park Road 49
National Park Service.
 
Location. 30° 14.597′ N, 98° 36.378′ W. Marker is near Stonewall, Texas, in Gillespie County. Marker is at the intersection of Park Road 49 and Klein Road, on the right when traveling west on Park Road 49. Touch for map. Marker is located at the eastern entrance to Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park and the northwest corner of the intersection of Park Road 49, Klein Road, and Redstone Ranch Road. Marker is in this post office area: Stonewall TX 78671, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Education for All (within shouting distance of this marker); The Reconstructed Birthplace (approx. 0.3 miles away); A River Runs Through (approx. 0.3 miles away); A More Perfect Society (approx. 0.3 miles away); Generations of Johnsons (approx. 0.3 miles away); "Mr. Jelly Bean" (approx. 0.3 miles away); Site of the Andreas Lindig Lime Kiln (approx. half a mile away); Trinity Lutheran Church (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stonewall.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This list consists of 26 wayside exhibits along the LBJ Ranch driving tour in Lyndon B. Johnson NHP. The markers are in order as you would encounter them on the driving tour.
 
Also see . . .
Marker in front of the Junction School image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
3. Marker in front of the Junction School

1. Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park - Official Website. (Submitted on November 30, 2015.)
2. Junction School Brochure from the National Park Service. (Submitted on November 30, 2015.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Once a Teacher, Always a Teacher Interpretive Sign
“Education is the only valid passport from poverty.”
Lyndon Johnson

As a former teacher, Lyndon Johnson understood the importance of education and its ability to transform peopleís lives. His presidential years saw an unprecedented wave of over 60 education bills which continue to make a difference in the lives of millions of Americans.

A small selection of President Johnsonís education legacy.

(Photo Caption)
President Lyndon Johnson addresses students at South West Texas State University
East Entrance to Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
4. East Entrance to Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park
View to west along Park Road 49
in San Marcos, Texas, April 1970.
    — Submitted November 30, 2015.

2. One-Room Inspiration Interpretive Sign

Built in 1910, the Junction School served the rural inhabitants of Gillespie County for 37 years. Students walked to school to learn the “3Rís”—reading, writing, and arithmetic—in a sparsely decorated room heated by a wood stove and illuminated by kerosene lamps. A water bucket and dipper provided drinking water, and children brought their lunches from home in tin pails.

By 1912, when Lyndon Johnson began his education, Kate Deadrich taught 40 students here. Boys sat on one side of the room, girls on the other. The future president, youngest student in the school, often sat on Miss Kateís lap for reading lessons.

For the rest of Lyndon Johnsonís life education would play an important role. Inspired by his brief time in this simple schoolhouse, he would go on to become a teacher, and eventually as president, sign over 60 educational bills into law.

(Upper Right Photo Caption)
To work his way through San Marcos Teachers College, Lyndon Johnson (center) took a job at Welhausen school in Cotulla, Texas. From 1928-1929 he taught three grades and served as principal, coach, song leader, and part-time janitor.
North Side of The Junction School image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
5. North Side of The Junction School
According to Johnson, “About the only thing we had an ample supply of was determination ....” The experience left an indelible impression on him.

(Lower Right Photo Caption)
President Johnsonís mother, Rebekah Baines Johnson, was a college graduate who instilled in him a love of learning. She taught him the alphabet before he was two years old and how to read by the time he was four. She asked that her son be enrolled early at the Junction School.
    — Submitted November 30, 2015.

 
Categories. EducationPolitics
 
Once a Teacher, Always a Teacher<br>Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
6. Once a Teacher, Always a Teacher
Interpretive Sign
Located inside the schoolhouse
One-Room Inspiration Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
7. One-Room Inspiration Interpretive Sign
Located inside the schoolhouse
The Junction School Classroom image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, November 12, 2015
8. The Junction School Classroom
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 30, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 149 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on November 30, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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