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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Buffalo in Johnson County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Conflict at the Crossing

 
 
Conflict at the Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 16, 2015
1. Conflict at the Crossing Marker
Caption: (top right) Lieutenant George Templeton; (bottom) Diagram of the Crazy Woman Battle. Click on the marker image to enlarge it.
Inscription. On July 21(sic), 1866, five officers, three women, several children and ten enlisted men of the 18th Infantry came under attack from Lakota Indians as they approached CrazyWoman Creek in wagons and ambulances. Lieutenants George Templeton and Napoleon Daniels had ridden ahead of the wagons in search of buffalo. During their retreat to the train, Daniels was killed and Templeton wounded. The wagons moved to higher ground, circled to form a defensive position, and a day-long siege began. Thirst and the need for relief led some defenders to volunteer for a dash to the creek for water and others to Fort Reno for reinforcements. Both efforts were successful. The siege was lifted when a patrol from Fort Kearny arrived the following morning, forcing the Indians to withdraw. This was not the last ambush on Crazy Women. The high hills surrounding the crossing offered excellent opportunities for observation or attack, which became common occurrences during the next two years.
 
Location. 44° 5.044′ N, 106° 31.451′ W. Marker is near Buffalo, Wyoming, in Johnson County. Marker can be reached from Buffalo Sussex Cutoff Road near Irigaray Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Buffalo WY 82834, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Conflict at the Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 16, 2015
2. Conflict at the Crossing Marker
This marker is at the center of the five markers.
At least 5 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lieut. N.P. Daniels, U.S.A. (here, next to this marker); The Legend of Crazy Woman (here, next to this marker); Bozeman's Trail: (here, next to this marker); TA Ranch (approx. 10.1 miles away); Tisdale Divide (approx. 13.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker is found at the Crazy Woman Battlefield Monument. From U.S. Highway 87, take Exit 291, Buffalo Sussex Cutoff Road (Trabing Road) to the southeast for 12 to 15 miles. When you reach the Irigaray Road junction, make a U-turn and head north about 1 mile. There, take the poorly signed ranch road to the right about 1/4 mile. The marker(s) will be at a pullout on the right.
 
Also see . . .
1. Trading Station - Crazy Woman Crossing -- Wikipedia. On July 20, 1866, a group of thirty men and women under Lieutenant A. H. Wand left Fort Reno to travel to Fort Phil Kearny. Lieutenants Napoleon H. Daniels and George H. Templeton rode ahead to look for a suitable campsite at Crazy Woman Crossing. Unable to locate a suitable place, they turned back to join the larger group. Lieutenant Templeton described what happened next: (Submitted on December 13, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Crazy Woman Battle -- Fort Phil Kearny State Historic Site. On July 20, 1866, one of the first clashes between the Indians opposed to the establishment of the Bozeman Trail and the forts along it took place at the trail crossing of the Crazy Woman Fork of Powder River. Sioux and Cheyenne warriors attacked a small wagon train of soldiers and civilians under command of Lieutenant George M. Templeton of the 18th United States Infantry... (Submitted on December 13, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Wars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 13, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 180 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 13, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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