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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Calle de las Carreras

 
 
Calle de las Carreras Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 1, 2015
1. Calle de las Carreras Marker
Inscription.  
Esta calle se llamó de las Carreras por ella huyeron los conquistadores durante el sitio de Tenochtitlan.
30 de junio de 1521.

English translation:
This street was called "Getaway Street" (Calle Las Carreras) as it was here that the Conquistadors fled from the siege of Tenochtitlán.
June 30, 1521

 
Erected by Dirección de Monumentos Coloniales y de la República.
 
Location. 19° 26.061′ N, 99° 8.164′ W. Marker is in Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México. Marker is at the intersection of Calle Isabel la Católica and 5 de Mayo, on the right when traveling north on Calle Isabel la Católica. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Calle Isabel la Católica 26C, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México 06000, Mexico.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dulcería de Celaya (within shouting distance of this marker); El Gran Café La Concordia (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Café La Concordia
Calle de las Carreras Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 1, 2015
2. Calle de las Carreras Marker
(about 90 meters away); The Museum of the Estanquillo (about 90 meters away); La Droguería Plateros (about 120 meters away); Temple of the Professed or San José del Real (about 120 meters away); Hernán Cortés' Residences (about 120 meters away); Francisco González Bocanegra (about 150 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ciudad de Mexico.
 
Regarding Calle de las Carreras. This marker describes part of the "Night of Sorrows" (La Noche Triste) when the Spanish and their allies broke through the Mexica siege and fled from the enraged attackers along the causeways out of the city. Some 400-800 Spanish were killed and some 2,000 to 4,000 of their Tlaxcala and other allies were either captured or killed. Cortés supposedly broke down and cried at the end of the night due to the heavy losses and the desperate situation. After regrouping, his forces later attacked Tenochtitlan again, this time putting it under seige and eventually gaining control of the future Mexico City on August 31, 1521.
 
Categories. Colonial EraWars, Non-US
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 20, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 266 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 16, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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