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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Sarcophagus of Thomas Starr King

 
 
Sarcophagus of Thomas Starr King Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 9, 2013
1. Sarcophagus of Thomas Starr King Marker
Inscription. Apostle of liberty, humanitarian, Unitarian minister, who in the Civil War bound California to the Union and led her to excel all other states in support of the United States Sanitary Commission, predecessor to the American Red Cross. His statue, together with that of Father Junípero Serra, represents California in the National Capitol, and his name is borne by a Yosemite peak -- "A man to match our mountains".

California Registered Historical Landmark No. 691

Plaque placed by the California State Park Commission in cooperation with the California Historical Society and the First Unitarian Church of San Francisco,
April 24, 1960.


 
Erected 1960 by California State Park Commission, California Historical Society, First Unitarian Church of San Francisco. (Marker Number 691.)
 
Location. 37° 47.083′ N, 122° 25.38′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Franklin Street and O'Farrell Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1187 Franklin Street, San Francisco CA 94109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Blanco's Café & Music Box (approx. ¼ mile
Sarcophogus of Thomas Starr King and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 9, 2013
2. Sarcophogus of Thomas Starr King and Marker
The marker is visible here behind the fence and surrounded by daffodils, just in front of the sarcophagus. The statue of Starr King is by sculptor Ruth Cravath.
away); 851 O'Farrell Street (approx. ¼ mile away); Mary Ellen Pleasant Memorial Park (approx. 0.3 miles away); Uoki Sakai (approx. 0.4 miles away); Wally Heider Recording - 1969-1980 (approx. 0.4 miles away); 891 Post Street (approx. 0.4 miles away); Blackhawk Jazz Club (approx. 0.4 miles away); Issei Women's Legacy (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. The marker is on the west side of Franklin, right where O'Farrell turns into Starr King Way.
 
Also see . . .
1. First Unitarian Universalist Church of San Francisco: Our History. "From 1860 until his untimely death in 1864, our congregation was inspired by the ministry of Thomas Starr King. In 1861, he traveled across the state urging people to support the Union and bring an end to slavery. From 1862 to 1864, he raised huge sums of money for medical relief for the Union troops in the United States Civil War, and he is credited with "saving California
<i>Thomas Starr King, half-length portrait, three-quarters to right,...</i> image. Click for full size.
By Matthew Brady, circa 1850
3. Thomas Starr King, half-length portrait, three-quarters to right,...
Daguerrotype image provided by the Library of Congress. (Note: image cropped by about 30 percent to improve appearance.)
for the Union." There is one mountain named after him in Yosemite National Park and another near his birthplace in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. He is also honored with a statue in Golden Gate Park.
(Submitted on December 28, 2015.) 

2. Rev. Thomas Starr King - by the Starr King School for the Ministry. ...On George Washington’s birthday in 1861, King fired an opening salvo in support of his country. He spoke for two hours to over a thousand people about how they should remember Washington by preserving the Union....“I pitched into Secession, Concession and (John C.) Calhoun (former U.S. vice president), right and left, and made the Southerners applaud,” King recalled. “I pledged California to a Northern Republic and to a flag that should have no treacherous threads of cotton in its warp, and the audience came down in thunder. At the close it was announced that I would repeat it the next night, and they gave me three rounds of cheers.” ... Speaking up and down the state, King visited rugged mining camps and said he never knew the exhilaration of public oratory until he faced a front row of men armed with Bowie knives and revolvers. His friend, Edward Everett Hale, who made a similar contribution to saving the Union through his moving story, “The Man Without a Country,” said, “Starr King was an orator no one could silence and no one could
<i>Starr King's Tomb, Geary Street, San Francisco, March 4, 1865</i> image. Click for full size.
Published by Lawrence & Houseworth, March 4, 1865
4. Starr King's Tomb, Geary Street, San Francisco, March 4, 1865
One half of a stereographic view, image courtesy of the Library of Congress. Note that the small section of Geary Street that runs past the marker site is now Starr King Way.
answer.”
(Submitted on December 28, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkChurches & ReligionCivil RightsWar, US Civil
 
<i>Starr King's Church, Geary Street, San Francisco</i> image. Click for full size.
Published by Lawrence & Houseworth, circa 1865
5. Starr King's Church, Geary Street, San Francisco
The sarcophagus is visible here in the lower left. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.
<i>The Starr King Statue in Capitol</i> image. Click for full size.
By Harris and Ewing, circa 1937
6. The Starr King Statue in Capitol
Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.
Statue of Thomas Starr King in Capitol Park in Sacramento image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 18, 2013
7. Statue of Thomas Starr King in Capitol Park in Sacramento
This bronze statue of Starr King by artist Haig Patigian stood in the US Capitol from 1931 to 2009, whereupon it was replaced by a statue of Ronald Reagan and moved to Capitol Park in Sacramento.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 28, 2015, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 325 times since then and 88 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on December 28, 2015, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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