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Sunbury in Liberty County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Dead Town Of Sunbury

 
 
The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 2008
1. The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker
Inscription. As General James Oglethorpe explored this area along the Medway River in 1734, he marveled at its potential for a seaport city. Captain Mark Carr was a member of Oglethorpe's regiment and an early settler in this area of Georgia. As trade increased in early colonial Georgia, Captain Carr petitioned for a land grant to bring Oglethorpe's idea into reality. He was allotted 500 acres from the King of England. Using this land, Carr established the town of Sundbury in 1758. Carr was an early developer. He laid out lots and public squares here on the Medway River in St. John's Parish. He hoped to sell these lots for a profit.

The Growth of a Town
Sunbury started as a seaport for the settlement of Medway, which lay 10 miles inland, and for surrounding farms and plantations in the parish. As migration to the town increased, Sunbury's port rivaled Savannah's trade market and became the second - largest shipping port in colonial Georgia. In fact, Sunbury was the second - largest town in Georgia just before the Revolution, with a population off approximately 1,000.

The Beginning of the End
The Revolutionary War ruined the prosperous town of Sunbury. By 1778, the British occupied much of coastal Georgia, including Savannah, but not Sunbury. The colonial forces fought
Partial view of The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker, at right, in small park image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Partial view of The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker, at right, in small park
off a British attack by sea in November 1778, using cannon fire on the British ships. A second British fleet attack on Sunbury was successful. The British occupied the town for three years and left it in shambles. Sunbury never recovered from the effects of war. Sunbury, like other Southern cities and towns, saw many deaths from Yellow Fever in 1700s, and suffered more troubles when two hurricanes struck in 1804 and 1824. By the middle of the 1800s, Sunbury had become nearly a ghost town.
 
Location. 31° 46.227′ N, 81° 16.831′ W. Marker is in Sunbury, Georgia, in Liberty County. Marker is on Brigantine Dunsmore Road near Fort Morris Road. Touch for map. Located in small park at the intersection of the roads. Marker is in this post office area: Midway GA 31320, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Saint John's Lodge Number Six (within shouting distance of this marker); Sunbury (within shouting distance of this marker); The Old Sunbury Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sunbury Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Sunbury Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Famous Sunbury "Masonic" Oak
The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker image. Click for full size.
By The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker
3. The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker
Lower left Picture text The plan for Sunbury consisted of 496 rectangular lots and three public squares, with wide alleyways and six major streets running north and south, as well as nine streets extending east and west.
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Fort Morris (approx. 0.7 miles away); Colonel's Island (approx. 4.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sunbury.
 
Also see . . .  Coastal Georgia. old Sunbury was once a great seaport (Submitted on July 16, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceWar, US Revolutionary
 
The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker image. Click for full size.
By The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker, 2008
4. The Dead Town Of Sunbury Marker
Right picture text
East-west streets in Sunbury ran down to the wharves where ship docked and unloaded from Europe and the other colonies. In the Colonial Era. the Town grew quickly and became prosperous. The largest buildings and houses were built on lots nearest docks.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 16, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,066 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 16, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Christopher Busta-Peck was the editor who published this page.
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