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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Knoxville in Auglaize County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

New Knoxville: The Ladbergen Kinship

 
 
New Knoxville: The Ladbergen Kinship Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Baker, January 22, 2016
1. New Knoxville: The Ladbergen Kinship Marker
Inscription.
Side 1
The history of New Knoxville provides one of the best examples of chain migration to America. After the Shawnee were removed from what would become Auglaize County, James Knox Lytle, cousin to James Knox Polk, purchased land in Washington Township. Lytle platted a village of 102 lots in 1836, calling it Knoxville to honor his mother's family. Meanwhile, newly married Wilhelm and Elisabeth Fledderjohann Kuckhermann (later Kuck) immigrated from Ladbergen in northwest Germany. Having missed their boat to St. Louis, the couple lived briefly in Stallostown (Minster) and Bremen (New Bremen). They wrote home, encouraging others to emigrate; in the summer of 1835 the Fledderjohanns (Elisabeth's family), Meckstroth's, and Lutterbecks arrived. The families bought land near the site of Knoxville.

Side 2
Establishment of the village coincided with the earliest wave of German immigration to the United States. The former Ladbergers' reports from Ohio prompted an exodus to America, especially among those with limited economic opportunities. In many cases, immigrants arranged for their relatives and friends to follow them, creating a chain migration. Until 1850, all the settlers in Knoxville (renamed New Knoxville in 1858) were from Ladbergen. Later, others from northwest Germany joined Ladbergers in settling here. The

New Knoxville: The Ladbergen Kinship Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Baker, January 22, 2016
2. New Knoxville: The Ladbergen Kinship Marker
immigrants' shared culture included agricultural and architectural traditions, Protestant piety, and language - Platt Deutsch (Low German). For more than a century New Knoxville residents were trilingual, using Platt, High german, or English at home, school, church, and in their rural lives. Auglaize County Historical Society New Knoxville Historical Society E.R. Kuck Family Trust The Ohio Historical Society 2009 7-6
 
Erected 2009 by Auglaize County Historical Society New Knoxville Historical Society E.R. Kuck Family Trust The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 7-6.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 29.666′ N, 84° 19.006′ W. Marker is in New Knoxville, Ohio, in Auglaize County. Marker is at the intersection of North Main Street and East Bremen Street, on the left when traveling north on North Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New Knoxville OH 45871, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Plank Road (approx. 4.4 miles away); Fort St. Marys (approx. 4.7 miles away); Saint Marys River
New Knoxville: The Ladbergen Kinship Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Baker, January 22, 2016
3. New Knoxville: The Ladbergen Kinship Marker
(approx. 5 miles away); The "Short Level" of the Miami and Erie Canal (approx. 5 miles away); Miami and Erie Canal (approx. 5 miles away); Fort St. Marys / Fort Barbee / Girty Town (approx. 5.1 miles away); The Miami & Erie Canal and New Bremen (approx. 5.2 miles away); Miami and Erie Canal, New Bremen (approx. 5.2 miles away).
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 22, 2016, by Michael Baker of Lima, Ohio. This page has been viewed 237 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 22, 2016, by Michael Baker of Lima, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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