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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Collinsville in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Charter Oak Offspring

 
 
Charter Oak Offspring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, December 11, 2015
1. Charter Oak Offspring Marker
Inscription.
Offspring of Connecticut Original Charter Oak
Troop 77 Collinsville
Boy Scouts of America
April 25, 1964

 
Erected 1964 by Troop 77 Collinsville, Boy Scouts of America.
 
Location. 41° 48.667′ N, 72° 55.4′ W. Marker is in Collinsville, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Bridge Street (Connecticut Route 179) and Bridge Street and Main Street, on the right when traveling east on Bridge Street. Touch for map. Next to the Collinsville Post Office. Marker is in this post office area: Canton CT 06019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Collinsville- Railroad from both sides (here, next to this marker); The Collins Company Plow Building (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Canton Veterans Memorial (about 600 feet away); Collinsville’s Powerhouse Station No. 3 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Collinsville, Town of Canton (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Collinsville, Town of Canton (approx. 0.7 miles
Second and third generations image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, December 18, 2015
2. Second and third generations
The second generation of the Connecticut Charter Oak is behind the Marker. The third generation acorns cover the ground.
away); Constitution Oak (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Collinsville, Town of Canton (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Collinsville.
 
Regarding Charter Oak Offspring. In 1964, this Connecticut Charter Oak offspring was planted in Collinsville by the Boy Scouts. This white oak tree was called “Charter” because according to tradition, it was used to hide the Connecticut’s Royal Charter of 1662. When it fell down in 1856, people collected its acorns and planted the second generation. This Charter Oak came from a seedling distributed in 1962 on the 300th anniversary of the Royal Charter being hidden. Historically it was a symbol of freedom from oppression and is commemorated on the Connecticut State Quarter. The offspring can also be found in Simsbury, Avon, Farmington, Hartford, Middletown, and Eastford, Connecticut.
 
Also see . . .
1. Connecticut’s most famous tree. (Submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Connecticut State Tree. (Submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. The Charter Oak. (Submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
The white oak, quercus alba. image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, December 31, 2015
3. The white oak, quercus alba.
In 1947, the white oak became the state tree of Connecticut. This offspring of the Connecticut Charter Oak is a white oak and is located next to the Post Office on Bridge Street.

 
Categories. Colonial EraHorticulture & Forestry
 
Connecticut State Quarter image. Click for full size.
circa 2015
4. Connecticut State Quarter
On October 12, 1999 the Connecticut “Charter Oak” Quarter was issued. It was America’s fifth state quarter since it was the fifth state to ratify the US Constitution on January 9, 1788. The charter Oak was chosen because it was a symbol of freedom from oppression.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 218 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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