Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Collinsville in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Collinsville, Town of Canton

Viewing Site on the River

 
 
Collinsville, Town of Canton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, November 21, 2015
1. Collinsville, Town of Canton Marker
Inscription.
Canoe Club, circa 1910- The club house was near the present-day nursery.
Note: The house in back was lost in the flood of 1955

Ice on the river, Circa 1900

View of the river from the tracks, Circa 1910

Station, circa 1911, located along the bend of the river
approximately where the cannon now stands with a hotel next door.

Station and boardwalk along the tracks, Circa 1911
Tracks ran along side the river.

Flood of 1955- Site of present-day kayak and canoe shop.
Note: Used grindstones which are used in foundations throughout Collinsville.

 
Location. 41° 48.943′ N, 72° 55.242′ W. Marker is in Collinsville, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is on River Road (Connecticut Route 179), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. The marker is next to the Farmington River Trail. Park near 41 Bridge Street and walk 0.4 miles north on the Trail to the marker which will be on the right. Marker is in this post office area: Canton CT 06019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Canton Veterans Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Collinsville, Town of Canton (approx.
The Farmington River image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, November 21, 2015
2. The Farmington River
The Farmington River, in the background, has shaped the history of Collinsville. In the past it was used as a major source of power. Today it is a major source for recreation.
0.3 miles away); Charter Oak Offspring (approx. 0.3 miles away); Collinsville- Railroad from both sides (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Collins Company Plow Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Collinsville’s Powerhouse Station No. 3 (approx. half a mile away); Constitution Oak (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Collinsville, Town of Canton (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Collinsville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Collinsville, Connecticut. (Submitted on February 4, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. CollinsvilleCT.org. (Submitted on February 4, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. DisastersIndustry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsSports
 
The view from the tracks has changed. image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, November 20, 2015
3. The view from the tracks has changed.
The railroad bridge of 1910 was washed away in the Flood of 1955, but their abutments remain. The tracks next to the river are now part of the Farmington River Trail.
Over 100 years of river recreation image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, November 20, 2015
4. Over 100 years of river recreation
The Canton Canoe Club house was washed away in the Flood of 1955. They were followed by the Farmington River Water Ski Club which operated from the early 1960’s to circa 2005. The Simsbury crew team began here in the mid 1970’s. Today you will see a wide variety of canoes, kayaks, and paddle boards.
The ice dams of 1900 are history image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, January 24, 2016
5. The ice dams of 1900 are history
After the flood of 1938 and 1955, two large dams were built upstream to reduce the chances of flooding: Saville Dam (1940) and Colebrook Dam (1969)
The used grindstones are abundant image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, February 1, 2016
6. The used grindstones are abundant
The stone grinding wheels for the Collins Company came from Nova Scotia and were originally 4-8 feet in diameter, weighing 2,000-4,000 pounds. After they were used for sharpening tools, they were used for foundations and erosion control.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 4, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 208 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 4, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement