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Wheeling in Ohio County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Camp Carlile

Union Camp at Wheeling Island

 

—The First Campaign —

 
Camp Carlile Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 11, 2016
1. Camp Carlile Marker
Inscription.
first paragraph
On the morning of May 14, 1861, the companies of Capt. Andrew H. Britt and Edward W. Stephens marched across the Wheeling Suspension Bridge to Wheeling Island. They settled into camp on the northwestern corner of the island at the fairgrounds.

The camp was perfect for mustering and training. The men used the exhibition halls and animal stalls for barracks and slept on straw with blankets and quilts donated by Wheeling citizens.

More troops followed until the regiment was complete. Designated as the First Virginia (Union) Volunteers, it was the first Union regiment formed in the South.

The First Virginia's stay on the island was short-lived. On May 27, Col. Benjamin F. Kelly moved the regiment to Grafton to protect the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. This camp was christened Camp Carlile after Congressman John S. Carlile. Camp Carlile was used throughout the Civil War as a muster-in and training camp. At the end of the war many regiments returned here to muster out.

second paragraph
The First Virginia (Union) Volunteers were not the only soldiers to leave Wheeling in early 1861. Daniel M. Shriver brought together a group of 64 Wheeling men with Confederate sympathies to form the Shriver Grays. The Shriver Grays would become Company C, 27th Virginia Infantry,
Camp Carlile Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 11, 2016
2. Camp Carlile Marker
Map of Camp Carlile
one of the regiments of the Stonewall Brigade.

The Shriver Grays planned to move to Harpers Ferry via the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The Union was guarding the railroad, so a uniformed group of men would not be able to travel that way. On May 17, 1861, the company departed Wheeling by riverboat. They moved down the Ohio River and up the Kanawha River, then traversed over land to the Shenandoah River, and then down to Harpers Ferry.
 
Location. 40° 4.365′ N, 80° 44.17′ W. Marker is in Wheeling, West Virginia, in Ohio County. Marker can be reached from North Wabash Street 0.1 miles north of Zane Street (U.S. 40), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Located in Bridge Park. Marker is in this post office area: Wheeling WV 26003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ohio County / State of Ohio (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The National Historic Road in Ohio (approx. ¼ mile away in Ohio); Historic Bridgeport (approx. ¼ mile away in Ohio); Charles Ellet, Jr. (approx. 0.4 miles away); Augustus Pollack (approx. 0.6 miles away); Marsh Wheeling Stogies (approx. 0.6 miles away); List House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Wheeling (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wheeling.
 
Also see . . .
Camp Carlile Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 11, 2016
3. Camp Carlile Marker
Map Legend
 Camp Carlile. The West Virginia Encyclopedia (Submitted on February 11, 2016, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Camp Carlile Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 11, 2016
4. Camp Carlile Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 11, 2016, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 295 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 11, 2016, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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