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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Geneva in Seminole County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

King Philipstown/Osceola

 
 
King Phillipstown/Osceola Marker Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, December 24, 2015
1. King Phillipstown/Osceola Marker Side 1
Inscription. (side 1)
Here, where the St. Johns River emerges from near-by Lake Harney, stands a shell mound complex significant to the history and pre-history of Seminole County. The mound has been examined by anthropologists Daniel Britton in the 1850s, Jeffries Wyman in the 1860s, and Clarence B. Moore in the 1890s, and remains today a significant archaeological and anthropological site in Seminole County. The site contains archaeological evidence supporting its use by prehistoric Orange (2000-500BC) and St. Johns (500 BC-1500 AD) cultures and later by the historic Seminole.

By the time of the Americans settlement of the area, King Philip (Emaltha) and his son, Wildcat, (Coacoochee), together with about 200 Seminoles has established a settlement here known as King Philipstown.

At the start of the Second Seminole Indian War (1837-1842) the Indians, feeling threatened by the army camp established
(Continued on other side)
(side 2)
(Continued from other side)
at Lake Monroe in 1836-37, attacked the camp on February 8, 1837. The Indians were repulsed, and by the early 1840s the army had driven the Indians from the area.

About 1850 a man by the name of Cook operated a ferry here, and the location became known as Cook's Ferry. After
King Phillipstown/Osceola Marker-Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, December 24, 2015
2. King Phillipstown/Osceola Marker-Side 2
the Florida East Coast Railroad crossed the river in 1911, the area became known as Bridge End. From 1916-1940 the self-sufficient cypress mill town of 200 people known as Osceola flourished here operated by the Osceola Cypress Co. Daily cutting of lumber ran about 60,000 board feet. In 1926 it was described as "the principal commercial industrial community of Seminole County." The timber gone, the only relics of its past still visible are timber piling along the river bank, and on land, the square concrete block former company vault.

The area is presently known as Osceola Fish Camp.
 
Erected by Seminole County Historical Commission.
 
Location. 28° 47.284′ N, 81° 4.067′ W. Marker is near Geneva, Florida, in Seminole County. Marker is on Osceola Fish Camp Road 0.1 miles east of East Osceola Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located at the St Johns Trailhead of the Flagler Trail North and the Lake Harney Wilderness Area. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2195 Osceola Fish Camp Rd, Geneva FL 32732, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Lane (approx. 3.8 miles away); George C. Means Memorial Bridge (approx.
King Phillipstown/Osceola Marker in the distance in the middle of the photo image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, December 24, 2015
3. King Phillipstown/Osceola Marker in the distance in the middle of the photo
7 miles away); Community Builders (approx. 8.9 miles away); Lake Jesup (approx. 10.2 miles away); Naval Air Station - Sanford (approx. 10.4 miles away); Chuluota (approx. 10.8 miles away); Fort Reid (approx. 11.4 miles away); Fort Reid 1836 (approx. 11.4 miles away).
 
Regarding King Philipstown/Osceola. The Second Seminole War started in 1835, not 1837 as the marker text states.
 
Categories. AnthropologyNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 15, 2016, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. This page has been viewed 213 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 15, 2016, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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