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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Clayton in Contra Costa County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Old Marsh Creek Springs

 
 
Old Marsh Creek Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2016
1. Old Marsh Creek Springs Marker
Inscription.
This area in the mid 1850s, was a known hideout for legendary bandit Joaquin Murrieta, who worked as a vaquero for John Marsh on his rancho just east of here. It was also frequented by John "Grizzly" Adams, famed California mountain man.
In 1927 Old Marsh Creek Springs was the site of the first natural swimming pool in Contra Costa County. Gerould (Jerry) and Verna Gill founded Old Marsh Creek Springs, which consisted of four baseball fields, two swimming pools and a large dance hall. The grounds were a popular spot for recreation and entertainment, frequently attracting over 5,000 visitors in a given weekend. In 1965 the park was bought by John and Eloise McHugh and meticulously remodeled year by year to keep the natural beauty that is known as Old Marsh Creek Springs.

 
Erected 2015 by E Clampus Vitus, Joaquin Murrieta Chapter #13.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 37° 53.525′ N, 121° 51.078′ W. Marker is near Clayton, California, in Contra Costa County. Marker can be reached from Marsh Creek Road near Aspara Drive, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12510 Marsh Creek Road, Clayton CA 94517, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Old Marsh Creek Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2016
2. Old Marsh Creek Springs Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. History of Marsh Creek Springs (within shouting distance of this marker); Mount Diablo (approx. 3 miles away); Mount Diablo Beacon: (approx. 3 miles away); Mt Diablo State Park (approx. 3 miles away); What Are Those Towers For? (approx. 3.7 miles away); Mount Diablo State Park (approx. 3.8 miles away); Greenhouse Portal (approx. 4.4 miles away); Somersville Townsite (approx. 4.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Joaquin Murrieta: Literary Fiction or Historical Fact? -- Contra Costa Historical Society. The Murrieta controversy does contain another lesson for us all. Historical truths are often elusive. The general public usually prefers a good story over verifiable facts from primary sources. Most popular histories are commonly viewed through the lens of current social and political prejudices. Perhaps that is another good reason why history should be studied and analyzed with as much care as any of the physical sciences. (Submitted on May 16, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. The Strange Mountain Man of Mount Diablo -- Contra Costa Historical Society. Like so much of the Old West, Grizzly Adams was a mass of contradictions. He loved adventure but after being mauled by a Bengal tiger as a young
Marsh Creek Springs image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2016
3. Marsh Creek Springs
man, he spent most of his life as a simple cobbler. Adams made his reputation killing grizzlies but deeply loved his many grizzly pets and companions. The 'Wild Yankee' delighted in telling "whoppers" to the incredulous public but some of his wildest tales turned out to be true. In the end his death by a monkey was as strange as his life as both a killer and friend of his ferocious bears.
(Submitted on May 16, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. EntertainmentNatural Features
 
Joaquin Murrieta image. Click for full size.
By Unknown
4. Joaquin Murrieta
John "Grizzly" Adams image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer
5. John "Grizzly" Adams
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 16, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 215 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 16, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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