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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Charles City in Charles City County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sherwood Forest

President John Tyler's Home

 
 
Sherwood Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kathy Walker, August 11, 2007
1. Sherwood Forest Marker
Inscription. John Tyler purchased this plantation one mile west in his native Charles City in 1842 while serving as tenth president of the United States, and made it his home from 1845 until his death in 1862. Tyler lengthened the wooden 18th-century house to over 300 feet long, thereby creating the longest frame house in America. Before becoming president, Tyler had served Virginia as congressman, governor, U. S. senator and vice-president. He served as president of the Washington Peace Conference in Feb. 1861; both sides occupied his Sherwood Forest property during the Civil War. Sherwood Forest, a National Historic Landmark, remains the home of Tyler's descendants.
 
Erected 1997 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number V-36.)
 
Location. 37° 19.556′ N, 76° 59.704′ W. Marker is near Charles City, Virginia, in Charles City County. Marker is on John Tyler Memorial Highway (Virginia Route 5) 0.2 miles east of Sturgeon Point Road (Virginia Route 614), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in a marker cluster with four other markers. Marker is in this post office area: Charles City VA 23030, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies
Sherwood Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 23, 2012
2. Sherwood Forest Marker
. Sturgeon Point & Kennons (here, next to this marker); Kennon's Landing (here, next to this marker); Fort Pocahontas (a few steps from this marker); President Tyler's Home (approx. 1.6 miles away); Sandy Point & Cherry Hall (approx. 2 miles away); Binns Hall (approx. 3 miles away); Wryanoke & Parrish Hill (approx. 3.2 miles away); North Bend (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charles City.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Tyler House. (PDF) National Register documentation. Like the legendary Englishman, Tyler saw himself a political "outlaw" of sorts, inspiring the name "Sherwood Forest." (Submitted on July 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Sherwood Forest Plantation. Home of President John Tyler (Submitted on December 9, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USGovernmentNotable BuildingsPoliticsWar, US Civil
 
Sherwood Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 23, 2012
3. Sherwood Forest Marker
Sherwood Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 23, 2012
4. Sherwood Forest Marker
Sherwood Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 23, 2012
5. Sherwood Forest Marker
Sherwood Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kathy Walker, August 11, 2007
6. Sherwood Forest Marker
Shown with markers Fort Pocahontas (V 34), Kennon's Landing (V 35) and Sturgeon Point and Kennons.
President John Tyler's Home (Sherwood Forest) image. Click for full size.
National Register of Historic Places
7. President John Tyler's Home (Sherwood Forest)
John Tyler image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
8. John Tyler
This 1859 portrait of John Tyler by George P. A. Healy hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“In rallying to the cry of ‘Tippecanoe and Tyler, too’ in 1840, voters had their eyes fixed on the Whig Party's White House contender referred to in the first half of that catchy slogan William Henry Harrison, hero of the Battle of Tippecanoe. For most, his vice-presidential running mate, John Tyler, represented merely an afterthought. Within a month of his inauguration, however, Harrison was dead, and Tyler became the first vice president to be made president upon the death of his predecessor.

Tyler claimed the full powers of the presidency on taking office and thereby set a valuable precedent for future vice presidents who faced his situation. But Tyler's White House tenure was tempestuous. When his belief in the limited powers of federal government led him to veto his fellow Whigs' measure for reestablishing a national bank, he found himself deserted by his cabinet, formally read out of his party, and branded ‘His Accidency’ by former allies.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 25, 2008, by Kathy Walker of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,190 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 25, 2008, by Kathy Walker of Stafford, Virginia.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 19, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   6. submitted on July 25, 2008, by Kathy Walker of Stafford, Virginia.   7. submitted on December 9, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   8. submitted on July 17, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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