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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Barnwell in Barnwell County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

William Gilmore Simms

April 17, 1806 - June 11, 1870

 
 
William Gilmore Simms Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 22, 2016
1. William Gilmore Simms Monument
Inscription.
The lifetime of William Gilmore Simms, the preeminent man of letters in the Old South, embraced an era of American history marked by nullification, states rights, secession, war and reconstruction.

He responded to these crises by writing and publishing a total of 65 volumes comprising 27 novels of romances, five collections of short fiction, 18 volumes of poetry, two of drama, five volumes of history and geography, four of biography, five volumes of reviews and miscellaneous prose.

As an editor, he was associated with a number of significant periodicals. He was a popular lecturer on a number of subjects, leaving a number of important works in manuscript at his death.

Collins Park is the site on which the writer's son, William Gilmore Simms, Jr., Clerk of Court for Barnwell County 1883-1912, and his wife, Emma Gertrude Hartzog Simms built their stately home in the early 1900's.
 
Location. 33° 14.65′ N, 81° 21.55′ W. Marker is in Barnwell, South Carolina, in Barnwell County. Marker can be reached from Main Street (State Highway 3). Touch for map. Monument is in Collins Park and not visible from the road. Marker is in this post office area: Barnwell SC 29812, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this
William Gilmore Simms Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 22, 2016
2. William Gilmore Simms Monument
marker. The Barnwell Ring Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Barnwell (within shouting distance of this marker); Collins Park (within shouting distance of this marker); The Police Station (approx. 0.3 miles away); “The Sundial” (approx. 0.3 miles away); Barnwell County Courthouse (approx. 0.3 miles away); Bank Of Barnwell / Edgar A. Brown Law Office (approx. 0.3 miles away); Solomon Blatt, Sr. (approx. 0.3 miles away); Edgar A. Brown (approx. 0.3 miles away); Barnwell County Revolutionary War Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Barnwell.
 
Also see . . .  William Gilmore Simms. William Gilmore Simms (April 17, 1806 – June 11, 1870) was a poet, novelist and historian from the American South. His writings achieved great prominence during the 19th century, with Edgar Allan Poe pronouncing him the best novelist America had ever produced. (Submitted on June 14, 2016, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
William Gilmore Simms Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 22, 2016
3. William Gilmore Simms Monument
William Gilmore Simms Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 22, 2016
4. William Gilmore Simms Monument
William Gilmore Simms image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2017
5. William Gilmore Simms
This undated portrait of William Gilmore Simms by an unknown artist hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Novelist and poet William Gilmore Simms was a founder of a distinctly southern literary perspective, one that is influential in history and literature to this day. Simms spent his life writing, turning out a series of colorful novels as well as a substantial body of verse. He invested his fiction with local color and details of southern history, especially from the Revolutionary War period. Like Washington Irving, he adapted the style of Sir Walter Scott's historical novels to American narratives. Simms's writings were a conscious defense of southern civilization (including slavery) as humane, patriotic, and chivalric, especially in contrast to the cold capitalism of the North. This contrast, minus the defense of slavery, remains a staple of southern writing.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 17, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 14, 2016, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 186 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 14, 2016, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on August 16, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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