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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clemson in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Asbury F. Lever

(1875–1940)

 
 
Asbury F. Lever Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 24, 2008
1. Asbury F. Lever Marker
Inscription.
Asbury Francis Lever served in Congress, 1901–1919. On May 8, 1914, the Smith-Lever Act, introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Lever, was signed into law, providing for cooperative agricultural extension services to be administered by land-grant colleges. Clemson, a land-grant institution founded in 1889, has such a service. Rep. Lever is buried here on Cemetery Hill.
 
Erected 1989 by Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service. (Marker Number 39-6.)
 
Location. 34° 40.564′ N, 82° 50.58′ W. Marker is in Clemson, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker can be reached from Williamson Road near Palmetto Boulevard. Touch for map. Marker is on the Clemson University campus, located near the entrance to the cemetery on Cemetery Hill, just south of Death Valley. Recently, a paved road has been laid which allows easier access. Previous access was by a dirt road. Marker is in this post office area: Clemson SC 29631, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Calhoun Plantation Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); William Maxwell Poe Plaza (approx. 0.2 miles away); Howard's Rock (approx. 0.2
Asbury F. Lever (1875-1940) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 24, 2008
2. Asbury F. Lever (1875-1940) Marker
miles away); Memorial Park / The Scroll of Honor (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort Hill (approx. mile away); a different marker also named Fort Hill (approx. 0.3 miles away); Site of the First Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Clemson Agricultural College (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fort Hill Plantation Office (approx. 0.3 miles away); First Woman Graduate (approx. 0.4 miles away); Walter T. Cox, Jr. (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clemson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Asbury Francis Lever. Asbury Francis Lever (January 5, 1875 - April 28, 1940) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from South Carolina. (Submitted on July 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Asbury Francis Lever (1875-1940) - Find-a-Grave Entry. Elected to represent South Carolina's 7th District in the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1901 to 1919. (Submitted on July 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Smith-Lever Act of 1914. The Smith-Lever Act of 1914
Asbury F. Lever<br>January 5, 1875 - April 28, 1940 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress, 1917
3. Asbury F. Lever
January 5, 1875 - April 28, 1940
S.C. House of Rep 1901
U.S. House of Rep from S.C. 1901-1919
is a United States federal law that established a system of cooperative extension services, connected to the land-grant universities, in order to inform people about current developments in agriculture, home economics, and related subjects. (Submitted on July 7, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Lever Hall. One of the "high-rise" dorms, located on the campus of Clemson University. Named for Asbury F. Lever. (Submitted on December 29, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Asbury Francis Lever (1875-1940)
Asbury Francis Lever, a Representative from South Carolina; born near Springhill, Lexington County, S.C., January 5, 1875; attended the country schools; was graduated from Newberry (S.C.) College in 1895; taught school for two years; private secretary to Representative J. William Stokes 1897-1901; was graduated from the law department of Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., in 1899; was admitted to the bar in South Carolina the same year but did not practice; delegate to the Democratic State conventions in 1896 and 1900; member of the State house of representatives in 1901; elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-seventh Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of J. William Stokes; reelected
Road Leading to the Asbury F. Lever Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 24, 2008
4. Road Leading to the Asbury F. Lever Marker
to the Fifty-eighth and to the eight succeeding Congresses and served from November 5, 1901, until August 1, 1919, when he resigned to become a member of the Federal Farm Loan Board, in which capacity he served until 1922; chairman, Committee on Education (Sixty-second Congress), Committee on Agriculture (Sixty-third through Sixty-fifth Congresses); member of the boards of trustees of Clemson (S.C.) College and Newberry (S.C.) College; elected president of the First Carolinas Joint Stock Land Bank at Columbia, S.C., in 1922; field representative of Federal Farm Board; director of the public relations administration of the Farm Credit Administration until his death on April 28, 1940, at “Seven Oaks,” near Charleston, S.C.; interment in College Hill Cemetery, on campus of Clemson Agricultural College, Clemson, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted July 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Asbury Francis Lever (1875-1940)
Asbury Francis Lever, member of congress for the seventh district of South Carolina, was born in the county of Lexington, in the state of South Carolina, on the 5th day of January, 1875. His parents were Asbury Washington Lever and Mary Elvira (Derrick) Lever. Mr. Lever is of German-English ancestry, his maternal ancestors, the Derricks, being of German, and his paternal ancestors, the Levers, of German-English descent. His maternal grandfather, J.J. Derrick, was for several years prior to 1860 treasurer of Lexington County, South Carolina.

The subject of this sketch grew up in the country. His health was poor, but he was fond of horseback riding and of other outdoor sports. When not in school he worked regularly on his father's farm, an occupation which was of the greatest service to his health, and taught him valuable lessons in perseverance, self-restraint, and self-help. It was difficult to obtain an education, and throughout his college course he was obliged to practice a rigid economy. He graduated from Newberry College in South Carolina in June 1895, with a degree of A.B. He subsequently took a law course at the Georgetown Law School, Washington, District of Columbia, and was graduated from that institution in 1899. Shortly after his graduation he taught for one session in a country school near his home. At that time his preference was for teaching, but the excitement of the first Tillman campaign for governor of the state in 1890 gave him the first strong impulse to strive for the prizes of a public career.

Since his twenty-first year, Mr. Lever has devoted all his time and attention to political life. He is identified with the Democratic Party. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. (Source:Men of mark in South Carolina by James Calvin Hemphill pg 274.)
    — Submitted July 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. AgricultureEducationNotable PlacesPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 26, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,365 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on July 26, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on July 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on July 26, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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