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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lansdowne in Baltimore County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lansdowne Christian Church

Hull Memorial

 
 
Lansdowne Christian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 13, 2016
1. Lansdowne Christian Church Marker
Inscription. This church is a monument to one Civil Wary veteranís love for his comrades. Charles W. Hull and his wife, Mary A. Hull, gave the land and the building as a memorial to the men who fought to preserve the Union. The deed stipulated that a memorial service, Grand Army Day, be held in the church on the second week-end each May. Grand Army Day is still celebrated here.

The first such service was held on May 14, 1905. Five months later, at another ceremony, the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.), the leading Union veterans; organization, presented three stained glass windows to the congregation. Gen. Richard N. Bowerman, Commander of the Department of Maryland, G.A.R., contributed a stained glass window depicting the likeness of the G.A.R. membership badge (left). This window can be seen above the church altar. At the rear of the building are two other stained glass windows, one dedicated to Dushane Post 3, G.A.R. (a gift of the post, far left), and the second dedicated to Dushane Corps 3 of the Womanís Relief Corps (a gift of the corps, right).

On Grand Army Days early in the 20 century, veterans arrived from Baltimore on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and paraded through the streets to the church. After the service, the church ladies served dinner, and then the old soldiers gathered in the picnic grove for an evening
Lansdowne Christian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 13, 2016
2. Lansdowne Christian Church Marker
of shared stories and remembrances. In 1977, the church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 14.704′ N, 76° 39.787′ W. Marker is in Lansdowne, Maryland, in Baltimore County. Marker is at the intersection of Clyde Avenue and Baltimore Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Clyde Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 101 Clyde Ave, Halethorpe MD 21227, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Joseph Gans (approx. 1.7 miles away); Mount Auburn Cemetery (approx. 1.8 miles away); Restoring Water Quality (approx. 2 miles away); Of Fords, Felles, and Falls (approx. 2 miles away); Carroll Park at the Golf Course (approx. 2 miles away); Carrollton Viaduct (approx. 2.1 miles away); In Memory of Mary Young Pickersgill (approx. 2.2 miles away); Gwynns Falls Park at Wilkens Avenue (approx. 2.2 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Lansdowne Christian Church (Hull Memorial). (Submitted on July 15, 2016.)
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsWar, US Civil
 
Lansdowne Christian Church image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 13, 2016
3. Lansdowne Christian Church
Lansdowne Christian Church image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 13, 2016
4. Lansdowne Christian Church
Lansdowne Christian Church image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 13, 2016
5. Lansdowne Christian Church
National Register of Historic Places plaque located on the right side of the entrance doors.
Lansdowne Christian Church-Stained glass windows in the rear image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 13, 2016
6. Lansdowne Christian Church-Stained glass windows in the rear
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 15, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 14, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 158 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 14, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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