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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Farmington in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Farmington and the Freedom Trail

 
 
Farmington and the Freedom Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, July 19, 2016
1. Farmington and the Freedom Trail Marker
Inscription.
Known in the 1800’s as “the hub” of Connecticut’s Underground Railroad, Farmington was home to an active group of prominent and outspoken abolitionists, several of whom were involved in state, national and international anti-slavery movements. Three of these abolitionists participated in the Amistad case and brought the Mendi Africans here in 1841 after the courts declared them free. The Africans lived, studied and worked as free citizens in Farmington for eight months while money was raised for their return to Africa. Most of the buildings associated with the Amistad and the Underground Railroad remain, among them the First Church of Christ, the Samuel Deming House, the Horace Cowles House, the Noah Porter House, and the Austin Williams House, all on Main Street, and the Deming Store on Mill Lane. Foone, the African who died here, is buried in Riverside Cemetery on Garden Street.
 
Erected by Connecticut African American Freedom Trail.
 
Location. 41° 43.283′ N, 72° 49.8′ W. Marker is in Farmington, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (Connecticut Route 10) and School Street, on the right when traveling south on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker
The Samuel Deming House image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, July 19, 2016
2. The Samuel Deming House
This marker has been placed next to the home of Samuel Deming, an abolitionist who supervised the African’s stay in Farmington.
is at or near this postal address: 66 Main Street, Farmington CT 06032, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Farmington (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pitkin's Basin (was approx. 0.2 miles away but has been reported missing. ); "American Board" (approx. ¼ mile away); American Board of Commissioners For Foreign Missions (approx. ¼ mile away); Rochambeau Route 1781-82 (approx. 0.4 miles away); Lest We Forget (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Legend of Will Warren’s Den (was approx. 1.6 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Unionville Feeder Canal (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Farmington.
 
Also see . . .
1. Freedom Trail in Connecticut map. (Submitted on July 20, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Freedom Trail sites in Farmington. (Submitted on July 20, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. Walking tours in Farmington. (Submitted on July 20, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
4. Cinque. (Submitted on July 20, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansCemeteries & Burial Sites
 
Foone’s burial site at Riverside Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, July 19, 2016
3. Foone’s burial site at Riverside Cemetery
A native African who drowned while bathing in the Center Basin Aug, 1841. He was one of the Company of Slaves under Cinque on board the Schooner Amistad who asserted their rights and took possession of the Vessel after having put the Captain, Mate, and others to death, sparing their Masters, Ruez and Montez.
The Deming Store on Mill Lane image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, July 19, 2016
4. The Deming Store on Mill Lane
The second floor was used to educated the Africans for 5 hours per day, 6 days a week.
Freedom Trail image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, July 19, 2016
5. Freedom Trail
The Freedom Trail sites are identified by this brass marker placed on a granite post.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 21, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 20, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 222 times since then and 94 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 20, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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