Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arboretum in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Morrison Azalea Garden

 
 
Morrison Azalea Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
1. Morrison Azalea Garden Marker
Inscription. Assembled in this garden is a permanent collection of the Glenn Dale Hybrid Azaleas, originated, selected, and named by B. Y. Morrison, first Director of the U.S. National Arboretum.
 
Erected 1954.
 
Location. 38° 54.512′ N, 76° 58.277′ W. Marker is in Arboretum, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Eagle Nest Road, N.E. near Azalea Road, N.E. Touch for map. Marker is in the National Arboretum, at the southwest entrance to the Morrison Garden. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20002, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sandstone Sculptures (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Capitol Columns (approx. 0.2 miles away); National Capitol Columns (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Hub (approx. 0.9 miles away); Culture and Commerce (approx. 1.1 miles away); Mediterranean Imports
Morrison Azalea Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
2. Morrison Azalea Garden Marker
(approx. 1.1 miles away); Enterprising Families (approx. 1.1 miles away); Clark Calvin Griffith (approx. 1.1 miles away); Brickyards to Buildings (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Changing Faces of H Street (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arboretum.
 
Also see . . .  A Mountain of Bright Spring Blossoms. (Submitted on April 22, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
1. About the Morrison Garden
(Transcription of the text in Photograph 3.) This garden is named in honor of the late Benjamin Y. Morrison, first director of the U.S. National Arboretum and originator of the Glenn Dale hybrid azaleas. Between 1940 to 1952, 445 cultivars of Glenn Dale azaleas were introduced.

The primary purpose in breeding the Glenn Dale azaleas was to obtain evergreen types with flowers as large and varied as those
About the Morrison Garden image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
3. About the Morrison Garden
of the Southern Indian Hybrids but still cold hardy in the mid-Atlantic states. Morrison also wanted to develop a race of azaleas which would bloom from mid-April to mid-June.

Breeding of the Glenn Dales began in 1930 at the U.S. Plant Introduction Station, Glenn Dale, Maryland at the time Morrison was Chief, Division of Plant Exploration and Introduction and Acting Director of the U.S. National Arboretum. Several species and their varieties or cultivars were used in developing the Glenn Dale azaleas. These included Rhododendron kaempferi, R. mucronatum, R. indicurn, R. phoeniceum, and R. simsii.

As a result of this varied parentage, the Glenn Dales exhibit a wide range of flower size, form and color, blooming time, plant habit and hardiness. There are single, hose-in-hose, semi-double and double forms of flowers. Some cultivars have flowers up to 4¼ inches across. Flower colors are various shades of pink, rose, red, orange, purple, lavender and white, including some with stripes, flecks, variegated margins and throats. By selecting early, mid-season and late flowering Glenn Dales, bloom can be had in the garden from mid-April to mid-June. Plant
Morrison Garden image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
4. Morrison Garden
habit is also variable, from low compact slow growing cultivars to those which are tall, open and fast growing. While bred primarily for the mid-Atlantic region, U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Hardiness Zone 7 (0° to 10°F), many cultivars are being grown as far north as Long Island and Connecticut, Zone 6 (-10° to 0° F).

Dedicated May 3, 1954.
    — Submitted April 22, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.

 
Categories. Horticulture & Forestry
 
Rhododendron ‘Dream.’ Glenn Dale Azalea image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
5. Rhododendron ‘Dream.’ Glenn Dale Azalea
View From the Woods: The Morrison Garden image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
6. View From the Woods: The Morrison Garden
The Azalea in Photo 5 can be seen in the walled garden. Beyond the trees is a meadow.
Arboretum Azaleas image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 4, 2008
7. Arboretum Azaleas
The Flowers That Bloom In The Spring image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 4, 2008
8. The Flowers That Bloom In The Spring
With apologies to Gilbert and Sullivan
Color image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 4, 2008
9. Color
Amazing Azaleas image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 4, 2008
10. Amazing Azaleas
Blend image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 4, 2008
11. Blend
One of the amazing things about Morrison Garden is that Azaleas come in many shapes and colors.
Green image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 4, 2008
12. Green
One of my teachers observed that this area has many different shades of green. Here's an example.
This bud's for you image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 4, 2008
13. This bud's for you
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 22, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,594 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 22, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on May 5, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.
Paid Advertisement