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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Cleone in Mendocino County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Harvesting the Shore

 
 
Harvesting the Shore Marker, left section image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 22, 2016
1. Harvesting the Shore Marker, left section
Captions: (top row, left to right) fish hooks; Pomo boat in the tules; Yurok man fishing from the shore with net; Pomo dancer; Pomo baskets adorned with abalone and clam shells and bird feathers.; Local Native Americans continued to gather seaweed, one of their customary foods.; California mussels; (bottom row, left to right) gooseneck barnacles; sea palm; bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) can grow a foot a day and reach 100 feet in length creating underwater "forests" that feed millions of animals and provide resting places for seabirds. Traditionally bulbs were roasted and eaten, or used as water carriers on hunting trips.; purple shore crab, acorn barnacles; periwinkle snail; sunflower sea star,; gumboot chiton; hermit crab; kelp crab; red abalone.
Inscription. For thousands of years, the Cum-a-Lul Pa'Mu (Coastal Pomo) and neighboring Indian tribal groups have set up seasonal camps within a few hundred yards of this beach to gather the sea's valuable food resources.
Fishing
Pomo caught ocean fish near the shore, and salmon in the rivers with nets. harpoons, and hooks made of shell and bone. Fishing lines were made of wild iris fibers. Surf fish and seaweed was often dried on the rocks or on beds of water grass.
A Seaside Kitchen
Women cooked fish over open fires, baked them in rock-lined pits, or dried and smoked then for future use.
Mussels were popular shellfish, often cooked in holes of the shoreline rock.
Anemones were toasted on sticks over open fires.
Women cooked chitons and barnacles in hot coals or sun-dried them for future use.
Abalone was beaten to tenderize it before cooking, or dried raw and cut into strips for winter use.
After gathering, seaweed was dried on rocks, and then later cooked in earthen ovens. It was also a source of salt. Sea palms and kelp were roasted in hot ashes.
Tradition
The tradition of food gathering and preparation is an element of heritage and culture that many local Native Americans still highly value. Dried seafood plays an important role in the diet of many
Harvesting the Shore Marker, right section image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 22, 2016
2. Harvesting the Shore Marker, right section
Captions: (top row, left to right) fish hooks; Pomo boat in the tules; Yurok man fishing from the shore with net; Pomo dancer; Pomo baskets adorned with abalone and clam shells and bird feathers.; Local Native Americans continued to gather seaweed, one of their customary foods.; California mussels; (bottom row, left to right) gooseneck barnacles; sea palm; bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) can grow a foot a day and reach 100 feet in length creating underwater "forests" that feed millions of animals and provide resting places for seabirds. Traditionally bulbs were roasted and eaten, or used as water carriers on hunting trips.; purple shore crab, acorn barnacles; periwinkle snail; sunflower sea star,; gumboot chiton; hermit crab; kelp crab; red abalone.
Native Americans.
 
Erected by California State Parks.
 
Location. 39° 29.376′ N, 123° 48.148′ W. Marker is near Cleone, California, in Mendocino County. Marker can be reached from Mill Creek Drive near California Route 1. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Bragg CA 95437, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Timber Years (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Surrounded By Trees (approx. 2.6 miles away); Our Past Through Our Trash (approx. 2.7 miles away); The Weller House (approx. 3 miles away); Dynamite Shack (approx. 3 miles away); Fort Building (approx. 3 miles away); Charles Russell Johnson (approx. 3.1 miles away); Fort Bragg (approx. 3.1 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker is located on the Laguna Point Trail in MacKerricher State Park.
 
Categories. AnthropologyNative Americans
 
Harvesting the Shore Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 22, 2016
3. Harvesting the Shore Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 10, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 10, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 137 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 10, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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