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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near New Albany in Union County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Ishtehotopah

 
 
Ishtehotopah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 4, 2016
1. Ishtehotopah Marker
Inscription. Home ½ mi. SE. Last Chickasaw king, giving name to King's Creek & King's Ford Rd. (this highway). Authorized Monroe Mission; signed Pontotoc Creek Treaty, 1832, & led party to Indian Territory, where he died, 1840.
 
Erected 1957 by Mississippi Historical Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Mississippi State Historical Marker Program marker series.
 
Location. 34° 27.081′ N, 89° 0.863′ W. Marker is near New Albany, Mississippi, in Union County. Marker is on State Highway 15 0.3 miles south of South Central Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located just south of King Creek. Marker is in this post office area: New Albany MS 38652, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Elder Roma Wilson & Rev. Leon Pinson (approx. 2.5 miles away); Union County, Mississippi (approx. 2.9 miles away); New Albany, Mississippi (approx. 3 miles away); William Faulkner (approx. 3.1 miles away); Mosley and Johnson (approx. 3.1 miles away); Glenfield Baptist Church (approx. 4.4 miles away); Stratford Company (approx. 4.7 miles away); Blue Springs (approx. 8.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Albany.
 
Regarding Ishtehotopah.
View looking north towards New Albany - King Creek just a few yards north image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 4, 2016
2. View looking north towards New Albany - King Creek just a few yards north
On June 9th 1838, the last Chickasaw King, Ishtehotopah, and 129 of his followers left Pontotoc, Mississippi, with A. M. M. Upshaw for Indian Territory. The Chickasaws that remained east of the Mississippi were concerned about moving west because of the epidemic of smallpox raging in Indian Territory. During the trek west, Ishtahotapah's wife would die. It would be October before any significant numbers of the remaining Chickasaws would set out for Indian Territory.
 
Also see . . .  The Removal of the Chickasaw Indians. (Submitted on August 12, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable PersonsRoads & Vehicles
 
Looking south on MS-15 to Ecru. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 4, 2016
3. Looking south on MS-15 to Ecru.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 17, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 12, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 174 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 12, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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