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Montross in Westmoreland County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Tempting Target

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

 

—War of 1812 —

 
Tempting Target Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2016
1. Tempting Target Marker
Inscription. Virginia’s Northern Neck was an attractive target for the British. Its many tobacco plantations—spread over more than a thousand miles of shoreline—were vulnerable to invasion from the water. Launching raids from the Potomac River and its creeks, the British plundered the rich fields and offered freedom to the slaves who worked them.

During 1814, Westmoreland and Northumberland counties endured more raids, suffered greater property destruction, and lost more slaves than Virginia’s other Tidewater counties combined. By mid-August, the Potomac plantations along the shores of the Northern Neck were devastated.

"It is expected and not without reason that farther (sic) attempts will be made, by British troops…to land and pillage the people in this quarter… Their object is negroes and provisions.”
–William Lambert letter to Governor James Barbour, April 23, 1814

(caption)
In 25 days during the summer of 1814 there were nine major raids against counties in Virginia and Southern Maryland.

(sidebar)
Explore more War of 1812-related sites on Virginia’s Northern Neck:
* Westmoreland State Park — View the Potomac River from the cliffs where in 1814 British ships and smoke from nearby raids would have been visible.
* Nomini
Tempting Target Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2016
2. Tempting Target Marker
The Visitor Center is in the background.
Creek — Travel by paddled or trailerable boat on the waters where British raiders came ashore twice in 1814.
* Kinsale — Visit the museum and nearby monument to James Sigourney, killed in action when the British overpowered the ship he commanded.
 
Erected 2013 by National Park Service, US Department of Interior.
 
Location. 38° 10.194′ N, 76° 51.832′ W. Marker is in Montross, Virginia, in Westmoreland County. Marker is on Cliff Road (Virginia Route 686) 0.2 miles east of State Park Road, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. This marker is on the grounds of Westmoreland State Park near the Visitor Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1650 State Park Rd, Montross VA 22520, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. War in the Chesapeake (here, next to this marker); A Testament to Craftsmanship (approx. 0.6 miles away); Putting the Potomac on the Map (approx. ¾ mile away); Dividends for the Future (approx. ¾ mile away); The Stratford Cliffs (approx. 1.6 miles away); Clifts Plantation Site (approx. 1.6 miles
Map of the Chesapeake Engagements, 1814 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2016
3. Map of the Chesapeake Engagements, 1814
away); Clifts Plantation Burial Ground (approx. 1.6 miles away); Westmoreland State Park (approx. 1.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montross.
 
Also see . . .
1. Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail. Fort McHenry National Monument and Shrine (Submitted on August 22, 2016.) 

2. Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail. National Park Service (Submitted on August 22, 2016.) 

3. Westmoreland State Park. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (Submitted on August 22, 2016.) 
 
Categories. War of 1812
 
Sign at the entrance to Westmoreland State Park image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2016
4. Sign at the entrance to Westmoreland State Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 22, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 20, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 106 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 20, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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