Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Granby in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Granby

 
 
Granby Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2016
1. Granby Marker
Inscription.
Granby
Settled as the Salmon Brook section of Simsbury early in the 18th century, and established as a separate ecclesiastical society in 1736, Granby became a separate town in 1786. From the beginning, farming was the main endeavor of the populace; first subsistence farming then raising fruits of the orchard, tobacco growing, and dairy farming until agriculture waned in the 1950s. Industry, producing shoes, horse-drawn carriages, wool cards, and forest products, developed along streams where water tumbled over the rock ledges common to Granby terrain. On July 4, 1825, in Granby at the Connecticut-Massachusetts border, Connecticut's Governor Wolcott commenced construction of the Farmington Canal (1825-1849) by turning the first spadeful of earth. Settled by emigrants from Windsor, Granby, like Simsbury, was the 18th century frontier for the mother town against Indians and their French allies.
(Continued on other side)
One early citizen, Daniel Hayes, was kidnapped by local Indians and taken to Canada, whence he escaped to return home to live nearly a half century longer. Granby sons and daughters in the 20th century have gone on to become prominent attorneys, president of a major life insurance company, Chief Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court, and Librarian of the State of Connecticut. Our
Granby Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2016
2. Granby Marker
(back)
sons have fought and some of them have died in each of the country's wars from the Indian conflicts of the 17th and 18th centuries to Vietnam. In the Civil War, volunteers from Granby included free blacks fighting for the freedom of their southern brothers. Many of Granby's young men were among those in the Connecticut 16th Militia Regiment who suffered and died in the infamous Confederate prison stockade at Andersonville, Georgia. Granby citizens participated in the westward movement of the 19th century, founding the town of Worthington, Ohio, now a suburb of Columbus.
Erected by the Town of Granby
the Salmon Brook Historical Society
and the Connecticut Historical Commission
1980

 
Erected 1980.
 
Location. 41° 56.758′ N, 72° 47.446′ W. Marker is in Granby, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Salmon Brook Street (Connecticut Route 10) and Meadow Gate Road, on the left when traveling south on Salmon Brook Street. Touch for map. Located on the grounds of the Salmon Brook Historical Society. Marker is in this post office area: Granby CT 06035, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lost Acres Fire Dept. (within shouting distance of this marker); Granby Veterans Wall
Granby Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2016
3. Granby Marker
(about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Veteran's Monument (approx. half a mile away); Granby Civil War Monument (approx. half a mile away); Site of Original First Congregational Church Meetinghouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); World War I Memorial (approx. 0.6 miles away); East Granby (approx. 3.1 miles away); East Granby Roll of Honor (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Granby.
 
Also see . . .
1. Town of Granby, Connecticut. (Submitted on September 4, 2016, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Granby, Connecticut on Wikipedia. (Submitted on September 4, 2016, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Granby Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2016
4. Granby Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 4, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 4, 2016, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 246 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 4, 2016, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
Paid Advertisement