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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Political Salons of Georgetown

 
 
Political Salons of Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 12, 2016
1. Political Salons of Georgetown Marker
Inscription. Throughout its history, Georgetown has been at the center of Washington’s political and social life. As early as 1789, Washington and Jefferson met in a local tavern to plan the new capital. The Marquis de Lafayette, who fought with us in the American Revolution, made a triumphal return to Georgetown in 1824 and was feted at Tudor Place by the granddaughter of Martha Washington.

While Georgetown’s star faded in the late 1800s, it rose to new heights when members of the Roosevelt Brain Trust moved to Georgetown in the 1930s. After World War II, Georgetown’s political salons drew participants from all quarters. The glamorous Senator and Mrs. John F. Kennedy lived at 3307 N Street. Members of Congress, cabinet secretaries, Foreign Service officers, Supreme Court Justices and newspaper columnists all lived within blocks of each other. They met in the drawing rooms of Georgetown’s handsome houses where you might hear Secretaries of State Dean Acheson and Christian Herter discussing the Marshall Plan, Ambassador Charles Bohlen explaining the Soviet Union, and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger debating the Vietnam War. Ambassador David Bruce might be discoursing on China, Washington Post executives Katharine Graham and Ben Bradlee discussing Watergate and Secretary of State Cyrus Vance pushing the Panama Canal treaties.

After
Political Salons of Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 12, 2016
2. Political Salons of Georgetown Marker
Police Callbox Restoration project information, on the marker's reverse.
the Cold War, Secretary of State Warren Christopher and Madeleine Albright, the first female secretary of state, both lived in this part of Georgetown while they served under President Clinton, who himself had lived here as a student at Georgetown University. World political leaders and national politicians can be seen coming and going at all these houses just as they have been for more than 200 years.
 
Location. 38° 54.463′ N, 77° 4.066′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 34th Street, NW and O Street, NW, on the right when traveling south on 34th Street, NW. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20007, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ambassador David K. E. Bruce (within shouting distance of this marker); The Last Home of Stephen Bloomer Balch, D.D. (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Holy Trinity Church (about 600 feet away); John Fitzgerald Kennedy (about 700 feet away); Holy Trinity Parish (about 700 feet away); Prospect House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hollywood on the Potomac (approx. 0.2 miles away); Forrest Marbury House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Categories. Politics
 
Political Salons of Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 12, 2016
3. Political Salons of Georgetown Marker
John F. Kennedy's residence at 3307 N Street, NW, mentioned on the marker. image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 12, 2016
4. John F. Kennedy's residence at 3307 N Street, NW, mentioned on the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 13, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 115 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 13, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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