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Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hospitals in Frederick

Caring for the Wounded

 
 
Hospitals in Frederick Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Hospitals in Frederick Marker
Inscription. In this building, soldiers who died in one of the many area hospitals following the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy were embalmed and prepared for interment at nearby Mount Olivet Cemetery or for shipment home. James Whitehall, the owner of the building, was both a furniture maker and undertaker, as were many furniture makers then. Dr. Richard Burr, a contractor with the U.S. Army, embalmed the bodies of officers and soldiers in this building. He gave public demonstrations of the new embalming process here on Sunday afternoons.

The Hessian Barracks at the south end of Frederick served as a U.S. general hospital throughout the entire Civil War. Following nearby battles, makeshift hospitals were established in virtually every large structure, from barns in the surrounding countryside to churches downtown. After the Battle of Antietam, some 8,000 wounded soldiers recuperated in Frederick at a time when the town's population was 8,000. Dr. Jonathan Letterman's revolutionary triage system for sorting and treating the wounded based on the severity of their wounds was first used here after the Battles of South Mountains and Antietam. His system is still in use today.

The stories of the care of the wounded, both Union and Confederate, and of the countless advances in medicine developed in time of need
Map Showing Locations of Civil War Hopsitals in Frederick image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. Map Showing Locations of Civil War Hopsitals in Frederick
during the Civil War are told here today in the National Museum of Civil War Medicine.

Frederick's Courthouse Square also contains a number of Civil War stories. Follow Patrick Street west to Court Street, then turn right and travel one block north.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 24.836′ N, 77° 24.563′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on East Patrick Street (State Highway 144), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Located on the west side wall of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine. Marker is at or near this postal address: 48 East Patrick Street, Frederick MD 21701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1862 Antietam Campaign (here, next to this marker); One Vast Hospital (a few steps from this marker); Frederick (within shouting distance of this marker); Market & Patrick Streets (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Crossroads of American History (about 400 feet away); Evangelical Lutheran Church
National Museum of Civil War Medicine image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. National Museum of Civil War Medicine
Two Civil War Trails markers face the alley beside a Frederick informational map.
(about 500 feet away); The National Road (about 500 feet away); Kemp Hall (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays a photograph of the Hessian Barracks, a portrait of Dr. Johnathan Letterman, a photograph of the interior of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, and a map of Frederick detailing locations used as hospitals during the war.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Hospital Sites related to the Antietam Campaign.
 
Also see . . .  National Museum of Civil War Medicine. The museum also occupies a second site - the Pry House near the Antietam Battlefield. (Submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Hospitals in Frederick Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
4. Hospitals in Frederick Marker
Markers are located on the wall of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine
Hospitals in Frederick Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
5. Hospitals in Frederick Marker
Markers are located on the wall of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine
Civil War Hospital image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
6. Civil War Hospital
The two spired Lutheran Church on Church Street in downtown Frederick was one of many houses of worship used as a hospital during the Civil War.
Evangelical Lutheran image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 2, 2016
7. Evangelical Lutheran
Close-up of photo on marker
Hessian Barracks image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 2, 2016
8. Hessian Barracks
Close-up of photo on marker
Dr. Jonathan Letterman image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 2, 2016
9. Dr. Jonathan Letterman
Close-up of photo on marker
Hospitals in Frederick Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
10. Hospitals in Frederick Marker
Markers are located on the wall of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine
National Museum of Civil War Medicine image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
11. National Museum of Civil War Medicine
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 19, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,795 times since then and 49 times this year. Last updated on September 18, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on August 10, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   6. submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7, 8, 9. submitted on September 15, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   10, 11. submitted on August 10, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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