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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Augusta in Richmond County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Augusta

 
 
Fort Augusta Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 2008
1. Fort Augusta Marker
Inscription. This stone marks the site of the Colonial Fort Augusta, built by order of General Oglethorpe and the trustees in 1736; and known, during the Revolution as Fort Cornwallis. St. Paul Church was built in 1750, under the curtain of this fort.
 
Erected 1901 by Georgia Society of Colonial Dames of America.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Society of Colonial Dames of America marker series.
 
Location. 33° 28.589′ N, 81° 57.646′ W. Marker is in Augusta, Georgia, in Richmond County. Marker is on Washington Street (6th Street). Touch for map. Located near the bank of the Savannah River, rear of the parking lot of St. Paul's Episcopal Church Reynolds and Washington Streets. Marker is in this post office area: Augusta GA 30901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Railroads (here, next to this marker); The Colonial Church of Augusta (a few steps from this marker); Five Indian Nations (a few steps from this marker); Washington's Southern Tour (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Marshall Robert Forsyth
Fort Augusta Marker, At Rear of Parking Lot St. Paul's Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Fort Augusta Marker, At Rear of Parking Lot St. Paul's Episcopal Church
(within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Augusta ~ Fort Cornwallis / St. Paul's Episcopal Church (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Colonel William Few, Jr. (about 500 feet away); Major Ferdinand Phinizy (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Augusta.
 
Regarding Fort Augusta. As Fort Cornwallis: American Patriots began building the tower on the evening of May 30, protected from the British's sight by an old wooden house. The tower was completed June 1, high enough to overlook the wall of Fort Cornwallis.

British then mounted two cannons inside Fort Cornwallis to fire upon the tower, but they were never able to disable the tower's 6-pounder. The two cannons were quickly disabled by the tower's gun. It is said one of the British cannons is located near the Celtic Cross marker at St. Paul's.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study marker on Mayhem Tower
 
Also see . . .  Fort Augusta & Fort Cornwallis. A Celtic cross on the grounds of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Augusta notes the site of Fort Augusta, built by James Oglethorpe in 1735. (Submitted on January 21, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
Fort Augusta Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 2012
3. Fort Augusta Marker
Lower Plaque reads " Richmond County Historical Society 1962 "
 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Colonial EraForts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Fort Augusta Marker, back view image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 2012
4. Fort Augusta Marker, back view
Fort Augusta Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 31, 2010
5. Fort Augusta Marker
Fort Augusta Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 2012
6. Fort Augusta Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 2, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,645 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 2, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on March 28, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on February 25, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6. submitted on March 28, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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