Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Mount Solon in Augusta County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Stokesville

 
 
Stokesville Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 23, 2016
1. Stokesville Marker
Inscription. The village of Stokesville, established by 1901, became a boomtown after the Chesapeake Western Railway was extended here in 1902. Tram lines into the mountains brought timber to the rail head. Lumber mills, bark tanneries, a stave and heading factory, and other enterprises attracted many workers, and the town’s population reached 1500 by 1905. A passenger depot, post office, hospital, hotels, stores, and a church served the community. Stokesville declined after 1910 as the area’s timber supply dwindled. A flood in 1949 destroyed most of its remaining structures. The town was named for the Stokes family, financial backers of the railroad.
 
Erected 2016 by Department of Historic Resources. It was dedicated September 25, 2016. (Marker Number W-241.)
 
Location. 38° 21.317′ N, 79° 9.017′ W. Marker is near Mount Solon, Virginia, in Augusta County. Marker is on North River Road (County Route 730) just east of Stokesville Road and Old C&W Railroad Road (County Route 718/763), on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. It is at the Stokesville Community Church and within view of the former railroad bridge, now a one lane wooden decked bridge carrying Route 763 over the North River. Marker is in this post office area: Mount Solon VA 22843, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Stokesville Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 23, 2016
2. Stokesville Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mossy Creek (approx. 6.6 miles away); Bridgewater College (approx. 7.1 miles away); Rockingham County / Augusta County (approx. 7.3 miles away); Mount Pleasant (approx. 8.5 miles away); Colonel George Moffett (approx. 8.5 miles away); James Edward Hanger (approx. 9 miles away); Bridgewater (approx. 9.4 miles away); a different marker also named Bridgewater (approx. 9.4 miles away).
 
Regarding Stokesville. The United States Board of Geographic Names no longer lists Stokesville an official place name. Google Maps will not find it.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Chesapeake Western Railway. “It extended from Elkton on the South Fork of the Shenandoah River in Rockingham County to Stokesville in Augusta Country at the foot of the Allegheny Mountains. At Elkton, it interchanged with the Norfolk and Western Railway. At Harrisonburg it interchanged with the Southern Railway.” (Submitted on September 25, 2016.) 

2. Department of Historic Resources Marker Dedication Press Release. (Submitted on September 25, 2016.)
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryIndustry & CommerceRoads & Vehicles
 
December 1925 Timetable for the Chesapeake Western Railway image. Click for full size.
December 1925
3. December 1925 Timetable for the Chesapeake Western Railway
From The Official Guide of the Railways. Click on image to enlarge. The upper part of the timetable shows selected long-distance Norfolk and Western trains to and from New York. CW trains met these N&W trains at Elkton for the local connections. The complete CW timetable is the lower part.
Chesapeake Western Railroad Bridge over the North River image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 23, 2016
4. Chesapeake Western Railroad Bridge over the North River
Today it is a one-lane bridge decked with tarred wood planks to carry County Route 730 across the river. Route 730 is called North River Road on the north side of the river and Stokesville Road on the south side. Route 718 continues Stokesville Road on the north side. The pavement that crosses the river on the bridge is also known as Route 763, Old C&W Railroad Road.
First View of the Depot after Crossing Bridge image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 23, 2016
5. First View of the Depot after Crossing Bridge
The depot today is a private residence.
The Former Stokesville Railroad Depot image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 23, 2016
6. The Former Stokesville Railroad Depot
It is a private residence today.
Stokesville Depot Today image. Click for full size.
By Phyllis A. Prats, September 23, 2016
7. Stokesville Depot Today
It is a private residence.
Stokesville Church, Founded 1903 image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 23, 2016
8. Stokesville Church, Founded 1903
This view is from the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 25, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 24, 2016, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 178 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 24, 2016, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on September 25, 2016, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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