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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
National Park in Gloucester County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Archaeology at Red Bank

 
 
Archaeology at Red Bank Marker (NEW MARKER) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 22, 2017
1. Archaeology at Red Bank Marker (NEW MARKER)
Inscription.
On November 11, 1777, American soldiers at Fort Mercer tested two cannons recovered from the Augusta, a British warship that exploded after running aground the day after the Battle of Red Bank. Both cannons exploded when tested, injuring and killing members of the gun crew. This fragment was part of a cannon that weighed approximately 5,400 pounds and fired 24-pound projectiles up to one-half mile. Archaeologists found this cannon using ground-penetrating radar and excavated it on September 11, 2015.

This portion of the original cannon weighs 848 pounds and lay undisturbed for over 230 yards only two feet below ground. It is displayed a few feet from where archaeologists uncovered it. We can draw on this and other newly unearthed artifacts to learn more about the extraordinary events of the Battle of Red Bank and its aftermath, as well as the hardships and challenges soldiers and civilians faced on the front lines of the American Revolution.
 
Location. 39° 52.249′ N, 75° 11.36′ W. Marker is in National Park, New Jersey, in Gloucester County. Marker can be reached from Hessian Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located in Red Bank Battlefield Historical Park. Marker is in this post office area: National Park NJ 08063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
NEW Archaeology at Red Bank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 22, 2017
2. NEW Archaeology at Red Bank Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Mercer at Red Bank / Fort Mercer is Alerted (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Red Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); Brigadier General Hugh Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); African American Soldiers (within shouting distance of this marker); Flag of Fort Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); The Naval Engagement (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in National Park.
 
More about this marker. Photographs on the marker depict an Archaeologist from JMA, a CCRG Company, using ground-penetrating radar to locate buried artifacts, and Reenactors portraying a Continental artillery regiment.
A diagram of a cannon on the right side of the marker contains the caption “The fragment on display makes up the section of the diagram indicated by the dotted rectangle. The original 24-pounder would have looked similar to this cannon.”
 
Also see . . .  Red Bank Battlefield. Account of the action at Fort Mercer during the Revolutionary War. (Submitted on October 24, 2016, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
Archaeology at Red Bank Marker (ORIGINAL MARKER) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 23, 2016
3. Archaeology at Red Bank Marker (ORIGINAL MARKER)
 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Archaeology at Red Bank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 23, 2016
4. Archaeology at Red Bank Marker
Colonial Soldier at the Red Bank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 23, 2016
5. Colonial Soldier at the Red Bank Marker
Closeup of Cannon Found at Red Bank Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 23, 2016
6. Closeup of Cannon Found at Red Bank Battlefield
Cannon Fragment Closeup image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 23, 2016
7. Cannon Fragment Closeup
Destruction of the British Frigate Augusta. image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 23, 2016
8. Destruction of the British Frigate Augusta.
This plaque depicting the blowing up of the Augusta appears on a nearby monument to General Hugh Mercer. The recovered fragment is from a cannon from this ship.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 22, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 24, 2016, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 124 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 22, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on October 24, 2016, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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