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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Campbellsville in Taylor County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Civil War Camp Hobson

December 1861 - February 1862

 
 
Civil War Camp Hobson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
1. Civil War Camp Hobson Marker
Inscription. Camp Hobson, a Union recruiting and training camp named for Edward H. Hobson, occupied the James Allen Sublett farm across the road from where you stand. Between December 1861 and February 1862, U.S. Mustering Officer Capt. S. M. Kellogg mustered nearly 2,000 volunteers into service there. They became the 13and and 21st Kentucky Volunteer Infantries.

Answering The Call to Duty

The recruits came from Adair, Barren, Carroll, Green, Henry, Metcalfe, Oldham, Owen, Taylor, and other counties along the Green River.

When they enlisted, a clerk entered their name, hometown, height, and hair color into a muster roll. When a regiment reached full strength - approximately 1,000 men - it was "mustered in" to service. Company officers lined up their troops. The mustering officer inspected the men and then led them in taking the oath of allegiance.

Col. Edward H. Hobson, a lawyer from Greensburg, commanded the 13th Kentucky Infantry until his promotion to Brigadier General. His hephew, William E. Hobson of Bowling Green, then led the regiment.

Col. Ethelbert L. Dudley, a Lexington physician, commanded the 21st Kentucky Infantry. When Dudley died in 1862, Col. Samuel W. Price was promoted.

Bravery Under Fire

Both regiments fought in most of the major campaigns
Civil War Camp Hobson Marker (back) image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
2. Civil War Camp Hobson Marker (back)
and battles in the Western Theater. The 13th fought at Shiloh, suffering forty-two casualties, at Knoxville, Tennessee, and in the Atlanta campaign. The regiment finished its service in Kentucky.

The 21st pursued Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg's army after the October 1862 Battle of Perryville. It suffered sixty casualties at Stones River, Tennessee, and saw action at Chickamauga and Ringgold, Georgia. The regiment fought in the Atlanta campaign, and at Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee. It ended its service in Texas.
 
Erected by Kentucky Heartland Civil War Trails Commission.
 
Location. 37° 14.782′ N, 85° 21.783′ W. Marker is near Campbellsville, Kentucky, in Taylor County. Marker is on Tebbs Bend Road 0.6 miles west of New Columbia Road (Kentucky Route 55), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Campbellsville KY 42718, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Green River Bridge / Green River Bridge Skirmish Site (here, next to this marker); Federal Stockade (approx. 0.2 miles away); Federal Hospital (approx. 0.2 miles away); Federal Field Hospital (approx. mile away); Camp Site (approx. 0.3 miles away); Battle of Green River Bridge (approx. mile away); "No Day to Surrender" (approx. 0.8 miles away); Morgan's Demand for Surrender (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Campbellsville.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 26, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 25, 2016, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 164 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 25, 2016, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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