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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tacoma in Pierce County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Emma Smith Devoe

1848 - 1927

 
 
Emma Smith Devoe Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 25, 2016
1. Emma Smith Devoe Marker
Inscription. Emma Smith Devoe moved to Tacoma in 1905. She was President of the Washington Equal Suffrage Association and worked constantly to win the women's right to vote.
 
Location. 47° 16.491′ N, 122° 28.033′ W. Marker is in Tacoma, Washington, in Pierce County. Marker is at the intersection of North 30th Street and North Carr Street, on the right when traveling west on North 30th Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tacoma WA 98403, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jennie Jones (a few steps from this marker); Alice Maude Smith, M.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); Ester Allstrum (within shouting distance of this marker); Nettie Asberry (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fannie C. Paddock (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ten Inch Shell From U.S.S. Maine (approx. 3.2 miles away); Lakewood Veterans Memorial (approx. 8.1 miles away); Military Road (approx. 8.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tacoma.
 
Also see . . .  DeVoe, Emma Smith (1848-1927) (HistoryLink.org). Emma Smith DeVoe was a major figure in the American woman suffrage movement and a Republican Party activist. Although she spent
Emma Smith Devoe Marker - Wide View, Looking East on North 30th Street image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 25, 2016
2. Emma Smith Devoe Marker - Wide View, Looking East on North 30th Street
The marker is visible here in the foreground, mounted in the sidewalk.
the bulk of her political life in Washington state, she was also a paid suffrage worker on the national level, helping to bring about woman suffrage in Washington in 1910, and the Nineteenth Amendment granting the vote to all American women in 1920. The guiding principle of her campaigns was: “Always be good-natured and cheerful” (Ross-Nazzal, “Emma Smith DeVoe,” 76). Her efforts in Washington state were both effective and controversial. The 1909 conventions in Seattle of the Washington Equal Suffrage Association (WESA), of which she was president, and the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), for which she was a paid organizer, brought to a head the controversies with the Eastern Washington clubs led by Spokane’s May Arkwright Hutton (1860-1915). Despite what some considered DeVoe’s heavy-handed leadership style, her overall contribution to the suffrage movement was extraordinary. After ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, DeVoe entered Republican Party politics, eventually rising to leadership positions on the state and national levels.
(Submitted on November 3, 2016.) 
 
Categories. Civil Rights
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 3, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2016, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 155 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 3, 2016, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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