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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lebanon in Marion County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Union Commissary Building

The Great Raid

 

—July 5, 1863 —

 
Union Commissary Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
1. Union Commissary Building Marker
Inscription. Providing food for soldiers was the business of the Commissary of Subsistence, an army department. The Union Army used this building, then owned by Christopher Beeler, as a commissary during the Civil War. All or part of the foodstuffs for the Union garrison in Lebanon were distributed from this building.

Union soldiers were issued a daily ration of ¾-pound of pork or bacon, 1¼ pounds of fresh or salt beef, and 18 ounces of flour. Soldiers also received potatoes, peas, beans or rice, coffee or tea, sugar, vinegar, salt, pepper, candles, and soap. On campaigns or marches corn meal and hard bread were issued.

According to the Official Records, Col. Charles Hanson ordered all of the ordinance and commissary supplies destroyed when Gen. John Hunt Morgan attacked Lebanon on July 5, 1863. Whether the order was carried out or not, Morgan did capture military supplies in Lebanon. Morgan also threatened to burn the town if Hanson did not surrender. By the time Hanson complied numerous buildings were on fire, including Christopher Beeler ’s house, which was attached to the rear of the commissary building.

After the Civil War a grocery store occupied this building. It later housed a liquor store owned by J. H. Kearns. In the 1930s Willie A. Deep purchased the building and opened the Sunnyside Saloon, which
Union Commissary Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
2. Union Commissary Building Marker
remained in operation until the 1980s.

(captions)

Burning of Town
By the time Col. Hanson surrendered, the roof of the depot and other numerous buildings wer on fire, including the houses of Ben Spalding, J.C. Maxwell, L.H. Noble, J.S. Noble, Christopher Beeler and Mrs. Abell.

Union Rations
The Commissary building in Lebanon was where rations were stored. As shown in this photograph of a commissary building in Virginia, barrels of grain and other supplies were kept here for distribution to the soldiers.

Drawing Rations
Union soldiers drew their rations at the Commissary. Here, the soldiers' rations were weighed and distributed.
 
Erected by Kentucky Heartland Civil War Trails Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail in Kentucky marker series.
 
Location. 37° 34.129′ N, 85° 15.394′ W. Marker is in Lebanon, Kentucky, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of North Depot Street and Martin Luther King Avenue, on the right when traveling north on North Depot Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 125 N Depot St, Lebanon KY 40033, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
Union Commissary Building image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
3. Union Commissary Building
walking distance of this marker. The Commissary Building (here, next to this marker); Battle at Lebanon (a few steps from this marker); The L&N Depot (a few steps from this marker); The Battle of Lebanon (a few steps from this marker); First Presbyterian Church (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Kobert Place (approx. 0.2 miles away); Courthouse Burned (approx. 0.2 miles away); Knott of Lebanon (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lebanon.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 8, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 5, 2016, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 149 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 5, 2016, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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