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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hurlburt Field in Okaloosa County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

U-10A Super Courier

 
 
U-10A Super Courier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 17, 2016
1. U-10A Super Courier Marker
Inscription. The U-10A, originally developed for the CIA, entered the Air Force inventory in 1958. With 231 square feet of wing surface area, and large flaps that covered three-fourths of the wing's trailing edge, this plane had superb Short Take-Off and Landing (STOL) capabilities. The Super Courier carried up to four passengers, and was used as counterinsurgency troop carriers, for psychological warfare operations, airborne relay station duty, and search and rescue. Modifications included a drop ramp, floats for water landings, and airborne speakers. This plane was assigned to Hurlburt Field from 1964 until its retirement in 1971. It was dedicated in the Air Park on 20 October 1973.
 
Erected 1973 by the Hurlburt Field Memorial Air Park Council.
 
Location. 30° 24.925′ N, 86° 42.058′ W. Marker is in Hurlburt Field, Florida, in Okaloosa County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Independence Road and Cody Avenue. Touch for map. Located at the Hurlburt Field Memorial Air Park and access to the base is restricted. Marker is at or near this postal address: 315 Independence Road, Hurlburt Field FL 32544, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. United States Navy VO-67 (a few steps from this marker); O-2 Super Skymaster
U-10A Super Courier aircraft. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 17, 2016
2. U-10A Super Courier aircraft.
Note the array of speakers on the side of the aircraft.
(a few steps from this marker); The Forward Air Controller (within shouting distance of this marker); O-1E Bird Dog (within shouting distance of this marker); AC - 119 G/K (Shadow/Stinger) (within shouting distance of this marker); Captain Hilliard A. Wilbanks (within shouting distance of this marker); Operation Provide Comfort (within shouting distance of this marker); Operations in Bosnia-Herzegovina (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hurlburt Field.
 
Regarding U-10A Super Courier. Special Operations use:
The Super Courier was a light utility transport developed from a civilian design first tested in 1949. Its short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability allowed it to operate from a clearing the size of a football field, and its ability to fly slowly at speeds of approximately 25-35 mph made it an excellent aircraft for visual reconnaissance. The original version of the U.S. Air Force Super Courier made its first flight in 1958. The USAF purchased three aircraft for evaluation the same year, designating them L-28As and later redesignating them U-10As. Eventually, more than 100
additional U-10As were ordered, mainly for use by Air Commando units in Southeast Asia. It was used for liaison, light cargo, small supply drop operations, psychological warfare, forward air controller and reconnaissance missions.

U-1OA Super Courier Tail #62-3606 History:
Serving from 1961 – 1971 this Super Courier was assigned to Malmstrom AFB, MO, Fairchild AFB, WA, Goldman AFB, KY, Seymour Johnson AFB, NC, and Hurlburt Field, FL. In May 1971 the aircraft was dropped from USAF inventory and was dedicated in the airpark on 20 Oct 1973.

Builder: Helio Aircraft Corp.
Power Plant: Single 295 hp. Textron Lycoming GO-480-G1D6 engine
Max Takeoff Weight: 3,600 lbs.
Max Speed: 180 mph.
Cruising Speed: 160 mph.
Range: 1,100 miles
Crew: 1 pilot and 5 passengers
 
Categories. Air & SpaceMilitary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 19, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 18, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 169 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 18, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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