Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Settlements & Settlers Historical Markers

219 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 19
 
Rear of Alameda Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Kirchner, July 22, 2011
Rear of Alameda Marker
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Alameda
This 18th century Spanish settlement was established on the site of an ancient Tiwa Indian Pueblo that was destroyed following the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The pueblo was reestablished in 1702, but in 1708 the Spanish moved its Tiwa inhabitants to . . . — Map (db m45435) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — AlbuquerqueOn the Camino Real — Population 331,767 ~ Elevation 5,310 —
Spanish settlers had lived here before the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, but the area was resettled when the "Villa de Alburquerque" was founded in 1706. In addition to promoting colonization, the new town was intended to provide protection from attacks by . . . — Map (db m8504) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Albuquerque
In 1706, New Mexico Governor Francisco Cuervo y Valdes founded the new Villa de Albuquerque (now Albuquerque), which became the principal settlement of the Rio Abajo, or lower river district. Here, the Camino Real wound its way through a series of . . . — Map (db m119762) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Casa de Armijo
Built in 1706 and occupied for many generations by the Armijo family who were prominent in local history. This hacienda was gay with social life. During the turmoil of the early settlement the Mexican, Spanish and American Civil War occupation . . . — Map (db m703) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Cuarto Centenario Memorial
La Jornada (The Journey), the bronze sculptural grouping on the corner along with the adjacent earthen work Numbe Whageh (Our Center Place) make up the City of Albuquerque's 1% for the Arts Funds Cuarto Centenario Memorial. The memorial commemorates . . . — Map (db m71142) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Don Francisco Cuervo y ValdesFounder of Albuquerque — April 23, 1706 —
Illustrious son of the Province of Asturias Spain, Governor of New Mexico. Sculpture funded by the City of Albuquerque 1% for Arts Program as per City Council Resolution 57, 1984. Buck McCain, Artist, Santa Fe Bronze, Inc. . . . — Map (db m70364) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Doña Elena Gallegos / Elena Gallegos Land Grantc. 1680-c.1731
Doña Elena Gallegos was a daughter of early seventeenth - century Hispanic colonists, Antonio Gallegos and Catalina Baca. They fled New Mexico with their newborn daughter during the 1680 Pueblo Revolt, and she returned in 1693 with two brothers . . . — Map (db m124926) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Founding Women of Albuquerque
(front) In February 1706 several families participated in the founding of Albuquerque but the names of only 22 are preserved in the historical record. Within those families were many women honored as being founders of La Villa San . . . — Map (db m45230) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Harvey Girls / Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter, 1869 - 1958
[Side A:] Harvey Girls In 1883, the Fred Harvey Company hired women to serve in its diners and hotels along the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. Thousands of respectable, intelligent women were recruited from the Midwest and . . . — Map (db m45326) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — In This Plaza Were EnactedA.D. 1706
By Governor and Captain General Don Francisco Cuervo Y. Valdez ceremonies incident to the founding of the Villa of Albuquerque named after the Spanish Viceroy Don Francisco Fernandez De La Cueva Enriquez Duke of Albuquerque — Map (db m45271) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — La Jornada
On January 26, 1598, amid embraces and farewells, Governor Juan de Oñate left Santa Barbara, in present day Chihuahua, leading an expedition bound for New Mexico. Nearly 600 settlers accompanied him, along with Mexican Indian allies and Franciscan . . . — Map (db m45443) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Los Padillas
Los Padillas is an extended family settlement which was resettled in 1718 by Diego de Padilla. His grandparents had lived on the site prior to the 1680 Pueblo Revolt at which time they were forced to abandon it. In the 1790 census the town, referred . . . — Map (db m67067) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Old Town History
Front of Marker - English: 1706-The Villa of "Alburquerque" was founded by Don Francisco Cuervo y Valdes, Governor of the Spanish province of New Mexico. It stood on the Camino Real (Royal Road), which ran between Mexico City and . . . — Map (db m45278) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — San Felipe de Alburquerque
First marker on left: San Felipe de Alburquerque, named for King Phillip V of Spain and the Duke of Alburquerque was, founded in 1706 by Gov. Francisco Cuervo Valdez with 30 families from Bernalillo accompanied by soldiers to protect . . . — Map (db m119449) HM
New Mexico (Catron County), Datil — Ada McPherson Morley (1852-1917)
Ada McPherson Morley ran a ranch outside of Datil, New Mexico where she raised three children, including Agnes Morley Cleaveland. A crusader for women's rights, she opposed the infamous Santa Fe Ring, worked for women's suffrage for over thirty . . . — Map (db m103064) HM
New Mexico (Catron County), Glenwood — Mogollon
The mountains and the town were named for Juan Ignacio Flores Mogollón, governor of New Mexico from 1712 to 1715. The name also is applied to the Pueblo Indians who abandoned the area in the early 1400s. These mountains were inhabited by Apaches . . . — Map (db m38255) HM
New Mexico (Catron County), Quemado — QuemadoPopulation 1,028 - Elevation 6,890 ft.
Spanish word for “burned,” Quemado is located in an extinct volcanic area. This community was first settled in 1880 by José Antonio Padilla, who brought sheep and started the stock raising industry in this part of the state. Quemado was . . . — Map (db m44056) HM
New Mexico (Catron County), Reserve — Reserve
Population 600 — Elevation 5765 ft. Located in the San Francisco Valley, Reserve was named upper San Francisco Plaza by its original Hispanic settlers in 1874. The name was later changed to Reserve in recognition of the U.S. Forest Service . . . — Map (db m36258) HM
New Mexico (Catron County), Reserve — Reserve
Population 600 — Elevation 5765 ft. Located in the San Francisco Valley, Reserve was named upper San Francisco Plaza by its original Hispanic settlers in 1874. The name was later changed to Reserve in recognition of the U.S. Forest Service . . . — Map (db m36261) HM
New Mexico (Chaves County), Hagerman — Blackdom Townsite
West of this location stood the now abandoned community of Blackdom. The community was founded circa 1908 by Francis Marion Boyer and his wife Ella. Several dozen African American families homesteaded nearly 15,000 acres of land and built a . . . — Map (db m56143) HM
New Mexico (Chaves County), Roswell — Humble Beginnings
Roswell’s first building was erected near this spot. Built by James Patterson, the 15 by 15 foot trading post was a rest stop along the Goodnight Loving Cattle Trail. The trading post was later acquired by Van C. Smith who, around 1870, added onto . . . — Map (db m102893) HM
New Mexico (Chaves County), Roswell — John Simpson Chisum1824-1884 — "Cattle King of the Pecos" —
John S. Chisum, a western icon, is generally recognized as the early West's most prominent cattleman. In the mid-1870s, Chisum was the largest cattle producer in the nation, with as many as 80,000 longhorn steers in his herd. Beginning as a . . . — Map (db m73451) HM
New Mexico (Chaves County), Roswell — Justice in the Wild West
Before the construction of the elegant courthouse that stands here today, a smaller courthouse constructed in 1890 was home to Roswell’s judicial system. In 1889, prior to construction, Captain Joseph C. Lea, Charles Eddy, and Pat Garrett (the . . . — Map (db m73527) HM
New Mexico (Chaves County), Roswell — RoswellPopulation 50,000 -- Elevation 3,612
Roswell was a watering place for the Pecos Valley cattle drives of the 1870s and 1880s. It was incorporated in 1891 and is seat of Chaves County, named for Col. J. Francisco Chaves, Civil War soldier and delegate to the U. S. Congress from the . . . — Map (db m38460) HM
New Mexico (Chaves County), Roswell — RoswellPopulation 50,000 - Elevation 3,612
Roswell was a watering place for the Pecos Valley cattle drives of the 1870s and 1880s. It was incorporated in 1891 and is seat of Chaves County, named for Col. J. Francisco Chaves, Civil War Soldier and delegate to the U.S. Congress from the . . . — Map (db m73453) HM
New Mexico (Chaves County), Roswell — 192 — RoswellPopulation 50,000 - Elevation 3,612
Roswell was a watering place for the Pecos Valley cattle drives of the 1870s and 1880s. It was incorporated in 1891 and is seat of Chaves County, named for Col. J. Francisco Chaves, Civil War Soldier and delegate to the U.S. Congress from the . . . — Map (db m119935) HM
New Mexico (Chaves County), Roswell — Roswell’s First General Store and Post Office
Roswell’s first general store and post office stood near this spot. The building was constructed by Van C. Smith in 1870 and hosted a somewhat famous postmaster, Ash Upton, who was a political player in the Lincoln County War and the ghost writer . . . — Map (db m102896) HM
New Mexico (Cibola County), Fence Lake — Fence Lake
There is a mysterious force that drives people to new lands and new frontiers. There is an abiding love for the land and newly turned soil, for young livestock and for the freedom of ownership, for the independence of spirit. This marker will remain . . . — Map (db m94982)
New Mexico (Cibola County), Laguna — Pueblo of Laguna
Keresan speaking refugees from Santo Domingo, Acoma, Cochiti, and other pueblos founded Laguna after the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and the Spanish reconquest of 1692. Named by the Spaniards for a marshy lake to the west, the pueblo still occupies its . . . — Map (db m36506) HM
New Mexico (Cibola County), Ramah — El Morro National Monument Inscription Rock
Until it was by-passed by the railroad in the 1880’s, its waterhole made El Morro an important stop for travelers in the Acoma- Zuni region. Numerous inscriptions carved in the sandstone date from the prehistoric, Spanish, Mexican, and . . . — Map (db m14129) HM
New Mexico (Colfax County), Cimarron — Black Jack’s Hideout / Colfax County War
Side A: Black Jack’s Hideout In Turkey Creek Canyon near here, the outlaw gang of Thomas “Black Jack” Ketchum had one of its hideouts. After a train robbery in July 1899, a posse surprised the gang at the hideout. The . . . — Map (db m45784) HM
New Mexico (Colfax County), Cimarron — Santa Fe Trail
Side A: The difficulty of bringing caravans over rocky and mountainous Raton Pass kept most wagon traffic on the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail until the 1840's. Afterwards, the Mountain Branch, which here approaches Raton Pass, . . . — Map (db m45821) HM
New Mexico (Colfax County), Raton — RatonPopulation 8,225 – Elevation 6,379
Once the Willow Springs freight stop on the Santa Fe Trail, the town of Raton developed from A.T. & S.F. repair shops established when the railroad crossed Raton Pass in 1879. Valuable coal deposits attracted early settlers. Nearby Clifton House was . . . — Map (db m77849) HM
New Mexico (Colfax County), Springer — Point of Rocks / The Dorsey Mansion
This is a two sided marker Side A: Point of Rocks Point of Rocks was a major landmark along the Santa Fe Trail. Located in Jicarilla Apache country, it was near here that the party of Santa Fe merchant J.W. White was attacked . . . — Map (db m55207) HM
New Mexico (Colfax County), Springer — SpringerPopulation 1,696 - Elevation 5,857
Located in the old Maxwell Land Grant and near the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail, Springer served as Colfax County seat from 1882 to 1897. Several men were killed here in one of the late flare-ups of the Colfax County War, a dispute between . . . — Map (db m45823) HM
New Mexico (Curry County), Texico — ClovisPopulation 31,194 -- Elevation 4,260
During the 1700s and early 1800s, Comanche Indian buffalo hunters used trails that passed near here. In 1907 the Santa Fe Railroad established Clovis to serve as the eastern terminal of the Belen Cutoff, which would connect with the transcontinental . . . — Map (db m145061) HM
New Mexico (De Baca County), Fort Sumner — Fort Sumner
Population 1,250 – Elevation 4,028 ft. Named for the fort built in 1862 to guard the Bosque Redondo Indian Reservation, the town of Fort Sumner grew out of settlements clustering around the Maxwell family properties. It moved to its . . . — Map (db m73721) HM
New Mexico (De Baca County), Fort Sumner — Fort Sumner
Population 1,250 – Elevation 4,028 ft. Named for the fort built in 1862 to guard the Bosque Redondo Indian Reservation, the town of Fort Sumner grew out of settlements clustering around the Maxwell family properties. It moved to its . . . — Map (db m73722) HM
New Mexico (De Baca County), Fort Sumner — Lucien Bonaparte Maxwell
A native of Kaskaskia, Ill, a fur trader and trapper who by industry, good fortune and trading became sole owner in 1864 of the largest single tract of land owned by any one individual in the United States. Maxwell founded the First National Bank . . . — Map (db m73719) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Anthony — Butterfield Trail/Espejo's Expedition/On the Camino Real
Stagecoaches of the Butterfield Overland Mail Co. began carrying passengers and mail from St. Louis to San Francisco, across southern New Mexico, in 1858. The 2,795-mile journey took 21-22 days. In 1861 the service was re-routed through Salt Lake . . . — Map (db m6553) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Anthony — Oñate’s Route On the Camino Real
Juan de Oñate, first governor of New Mexico, passed near here with his colonizing expedition in May, 1598. Traveling north, he designated official campsites (called parajes) on the Camino Real, used by expeditions that followed. In Oñate's . . . — Map (db m6549) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Doña Ana — Doña Ana(On the Camino Real)
This site, named after the legendary woman, Doña Ana, is first mentioned as a paraje along the Camino Real. Spanish rested near here as they retreated from New Mexico following the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The community was founded in 1843 as the Doña . . . — Map (db m38178) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Doña Ana — Shalam Colony1884-1901
In 1884, Shalam Colony was established on the banks of the Rio Grande near the village of Doña Ana by John Ballou Newbrough and a group of Utopian followers called Faithists. Newbrough’s “Book of Shalam" set forth a plan for gathering the . . . — Map (db m38199) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Hatch — HatchPopulation 1,028  -  Elevation 4,055
Originally established as Santa Barbara in 1851, Apache raids drove the settlers away until 1853 when nearby Fort Thorn was established. Abandoned again in 1860 after the fort closed, it was reoccupied in 1875 and re-named for General Edward Hatch, . . . — Map (db m24745) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Las Cruces — Jornada del MuertoOn the Camino Real
This stretch of the Camino Real leaves the Ríó Grande and cuts across 90 miles of desert with little water or shelter. Despite its difficulty, the dreaded “Journey of the Deadman” was heavily used by Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo travelers . . . — Map (db m45083) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Las Cruces — Las Cruces on the Camino RealPopulation 74,267 -- Elevation 3,909
In 1849, following the Mexican War, fields were first broken in Las Cruces. The town became a flourishing stop on the Camino Real, deriving its name, "The Crosses", from the marking of graves of victims of an Apache attack. Las Cruces since 1881 has . . . — Map (db m60679) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Las Cruces — Paraje San Diego
This paraje, or stopping place, provided travelers along the Camino Real with a final opportunity to water their stock and prepare their caravans before leaving the Rio Grande Valley and entering the desolate Jornada del Muerto. Caravans on . . . — Map (db m45084) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Mesilla — Doña Ana County Courthouse and Jail
has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior 1850 — Map (db m26924) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Mesilla — Head Quarters, Dept. of New MexicoFort Fillmore, Nov. 15th, 1854
I. The laws of the United States having been extended by proclamation over the Mesilla Valley and the territory recently acquired from the Republic of Mexico, the undersigned as military Commander of the same directs that Lt. Colonel Miles 3rd . . . — Map (db m6991) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Mesilla — 693 — La Mesilla
The 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the Mexican-American War, establishing Mesilla as a Mexican holding. Cura Ramon Ortiz settled families from El Paso del Norte and pre-territorial New Mexico here. Disputes over the border just north of town . . . — Map (db m119926) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Mesilla — The Gadsden Purchase Celebration
The Gadsden Purchase celebration held at Mesilla New Mexico in 1854.                         By A. J. Fountain Sr.Map (db m6992) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Radium Springs — Paraje de Robledo
This paraje or resting place was named for Pedro Robledo, a member of the Juan de Oñate expedition, who was buried nearby on May 21, 1598. This camping place was a welcome sight for caravans entering or exiting the dreaded Jornada del . . . — Map (db m38200) HM
New Mexico (Doña Ana County), Rincon — Rincón
Rincón was originally named El Rincón de Fray Diego in honor of a 17th century Franciscan who died here. Established as a settlement called Thorne in 1881, it became Rincón in 1883. With the establishment of the Santa Fe Railroad, Rincón . . . — Map (db m45082) HM
New Mexico (Eddy County), Artesia — ArtesiaPopulation 10,385 – Elevation 3,350
Artesia, named for the area's many artesian wells, lies on the route of the Pecos Valley cattle trails used by Charles Goodnight, Oliver Loving, and John S. Chisum. The town, established in 1903, is located in what was once part of Chisum's vast . . . — Map (db m61456) HM
New Mexico (Eddy County), Artesia — 394 — ArtesiaPopulation 10,385 – Elevation 3,350
Artesia, named for the area's many artesian wells, lies on the route of the Pecos Valley cattle trails used by Charles Goodnight, Oliver Loving, and John S. Chisum. The town, established in 1903, is located in what was once part of Chisum's vast . . . — Map (db m119811) HM
New Mexico (Eddy County), Artesia — Independent Spirit
The men who drove cattle from Texas up along the Pecos River during the mid-1860s until the barbed-wire era of the early 1900s were tough, independent and courageous. Those who chose to settle down and ranch in the surrounding plains or rugged . . . — Map (db m61443) HM
New Mexico (Eddy County), Artesia — Seven Rivers Cemetery
Seven Rivers was located south of Artesia near the confluence of seven branches of a stream that flowed into the Pecos River. Settled in the mid-1860s, the town flourished as a trading post and refuge for participants in the Lincoln County War. The . . . — Map (db m61457) HM
New Mexico (Eddy County), Loving — Loving's Bend
In July 1867 Oliver Loving, a partner in the Goodnight-Loving cattle concern, was attacked by Comanches while driving cattle to Fort Sumner. Wounded, Loving held off the attack for two days and nights. With the help of Mexican traders, he made it to . . . — Map (db m61471) HM
New Mexico (Grant County), Bayard — BayardPopulation 3,036 - Elevation 6,152
Sites in the surrounding hills indicate that Indians of the Mogollon culture (A.D. 300 – 1450) lived here long before the Europeans. In the late 19th century, this was a stronghold of Apaches led by Victorio and Geronimo. Today Bayard, which . . . — Map (db m38213) HM
New Mexico (Grant County), Bayard — BayardPopulation 3,036 - Elevation 6,152
Sites in the surrounding hills indicate that Indians of the Mogollon culture (A.D. 300 – 1450) lived here long before the Europeans. In the late 19th century, this was a stronghold of Apaches led by Victorio and Geronimo. Today Bayard, which . . . — Map (db m38214) HM
New Mexico (Grant County), Bayard — Bayard
Bayard Station was first called Hall’s Station, a depot on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe, serving a tuberculosis sanatorium at nearby Fort Bayard, which was named after Brigadier General George Dashiell Bayard. A settlement grew around the . . . — Map (db m121901) HM
New Mexico (Grant County), Hachita — Hachita
Located in the Little Hatchet Mountains, Hachita was founded around 1875 as a mining camp. The mountains supplied the camp not only with silver and copper, but also its name, “little hatchet.” By 1884 Hachita grew to 300 residents. Soon . . . — Map (db m37773) HM
New Mexico (Grant County), Silver City — Municipal MuseumTown of Silver City — New Mexico —
Silver City Centennial 1970 Municipal Museum Town of Silver City New Mexico Built in 1881 as a private home for Harry B. Ailman Acquired by the town of Silver City in 1926 and dedicated as a historical museum by the town of Silver City in . . . — Map (db m38307) HM
New Mexico (Grant County), Silver City — Silver City Centennial1970
This plaque was erected May 10, 1970 commemorating the duplication of the ride by the Grant County Sheriff’s posse, of the ride of: John Bullard James Bullard Andrew Hurlbrut Joseph Yankie John Swisshelm Henry Fuson Elijah Weeks Richard . . . — Map (db m126684) HM
New Mexico (Guadalupe County), Santa Rosa — Puerto de Luna
Established by the early 1860s, Puerto de Luna is one of southeast New Mexico’s oldest permanent settlements. An important farming and ranching center, the town was the Guadalupe County seat from 1891 until 1903. A strong oral tradition maintains . . . — Map (db m45906) HM
New Mexico (Guadalupe County), Santa Rosa — Santa RosaPopulation 2,469 - Elevation 4,620
The Spanish explorer Antonio de Espejo passed through this area in 1583, as did Gaspar Castano de Sosa in 1590. Santa Rosa, the Guadalupe County seat, was laid out on the ranch of Celso Baca y Baca, a politician and rancher in the late 1800s. It was . . . — Map (db m45894) HM
New Mexico (Guadalupe County), Santa Rosa — Santa RosaPopulation—2,469 - Elevation—4,620 ft.
The Spanish explorer Antonio de Espejo passed through this area in 1583, as did Gaspar Castaño de Sosa in 1590. Santa Rosa, the Guadalupe County seat, was laid out on the ranch of Celso Baca y Baca, a politician and rancher in the late 1800s. It was . . . — Map (db m45895) HM
New Mexico (Guadalupe County), Santa Rosa — Santa RosaPopulation—2,469 - Elevation—4,620 ft.
The Spanish explorer Antonio de Espejo passed through this area in 1583, as did Gaspar Castaño de Sosa in 1590. Santa Rosa, the Guadalupe County seat, was laid out on the ranch of Celso Baca y Baca, a politician and rancher in the late 1800s. It was . . . — Map (db m91041) HM
New Mexico (Guadalupe County), Vaughn — VaughnPopulation 737 - Elevation 5965
Vaughn, a division point in the transcontinental railway system, is located along the route of the Stinson cattle trail. In 1882, Jim Stinson, manager of the New Mexico Land and Livestock Co., drove 20,000 cattle in eight separate herds along this . . . — Map (db m47146) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — LordsburgPopulation 3,195 — Elevation 4,245
Lordsburg was founded in 1880 on the route of the Southern Pacific Railroad, near that used by the Butterfield Overland Mail Co., 1858-1861. It eventually absorbed most of the population of Shakespeare, a now-deserted mining town three miles south. — Map (db m38233) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — LordsburgElevation 4,245
Lordsburg was founded in 1880 on the route of the Southern Pacific Railroad, near that used by the Butterfield Overland Mail Co., 1858-1861. The town was named for Delbert Lord, an engineer with the railroad. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh landed his . . . — Map (db m38244) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — LordsburgElevation 4,245
Lordsburg was founded in 1880 on the route of the Southern Pacific Railroad, near that used by the Butterfield Overland Mail Co., 1858-1861. The town was named for Delbert Lord, an engineer with the railroad. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh landed his . . . — Map (db m73727) HM
New Mexico (Hidalgo County), Lordsburg — The Women of Shakespeare
(Front): Emma Marble Muir (1873–1959) Rita Wells Hill (1901–1985) Janaloo Hill Hough (1939–2005) Emma Marble Muir arrived at the mining town of Shakespeare in 1882. She and her daughter, Rita Wells Muir, learned . . . — Map (db m38246) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Hobbs — HobbsPopulation 28,794 – Elevation 3615 ft.
Named for the family of James Hobbs which homesteaded here in 1907, Hobbs became first a trading village for ranchers and then a major oil town after the discovery of oil by the Midwest Oil Company in 1928. — Map (db m61441) HM
New Mexico (Lea County), Monument — Monument
Settled in 1885 and named for a marker at the springs a few miles west, Monument remained a ranching community until oil was discovered in 1928. The Indian statue, called Geronimo by residents, was erected in 1928 by land developers. Monument has . . . — Map (db m61442) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — CapitánPopulation 1400 -- Elevation 6350 Ft.
Many incidents in the Lincoln County War, 1876-1879, occurred in the area around Capitan. The promoters Charles B. and John A. Eddy platted the townsite in 1900, after building a spur of the El Paso & Northeastern Railroad from Carrizozo in order to . . . — Map (db m45949) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — CapitánPopulation 1400 -- Elevation 6350 Ft.
[This is a two-sided marker] Side A: Many incidents in the Lincoln County War, 1876-1879, occurred in the area around Capitán. The promoters Charles B. and John A. Eddy platted the townsite in 1900, after building a spur of the . . . — Map (db m45950) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Capitan — CapitánPopulation 1400 -- Elevation 6350 Ft.
Many incidents in the Lincoln County War, 1876-1879, occurred in the area around Capitán. The promoters Charles B. and John A. Eddy platted the townsite in 1900, after building a spur of the El Paso & Northeastern Railroad from Carrizozo in order to . . . — Map (db m45951) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — CarrizozoPopulation 1,222 – Elevation 5,438
Carrizozo, county seat of Lincoln County, was established in 1899, a new town on the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad. The ghost town of White Oaks, once a booming mining camp, is nearby. Billy the Kid, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Governor Lew Wallace, . . . — Map (db m45909) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — CarrizozoPopulation 1,222 - Elevation 5,438 Ft
Carrizozo, county seat of Lincoln County, was established in 1899, a new town on the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad. The ghost town of White Oaks, once a booming mining camp, is nearby. Billy the Kid, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Governor Lew Wallace, . . . — Map (db m45910) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — CarrizozoPopulation 1,222 - Elevation 5,438 Ft
Carrizozo, county seat of Lincoln County, was established in 1899, a new town on the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad. The ghost town of White Oaks, once a booming mining camp, is nearby. Billy the Kid, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Governor Lew Wallace, . . . — Map (db m45912) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Carrizozo — CarrizozoPopulation 1,222 – Elevation 5,438
Carrizozo, county seat of Lincoln County, was established in 1899, a new town on the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad. The ghost town of White Oaks, once a booming mining camp, is nearby. Billy the Kid, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Governor Lew Wallace, . . . — Map (db m45914) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Corona — Corona, New MexicoPopulation: 210 (1990 Census) Elevation: 6666 feet Founded in 1903 Incorporated in 1947
The earliest settlers in the area were the Spanish ranchers who raised sheep and cattle on the open rangelands surrounding Corona. In the 1850's, a stage line was established from Las Vegas to White Oaks and Fort Stanton, transporting passengers, . . . — Map (db m45907) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Corona — Greathouse Station and Tavern
In late November, 1880, William “Billy the Kid” Bonney, David Rudabaugh and William Wilson were hiding out near here at a store and tavern operated by James Greathouse and a partner named Kuch. The night of November 27, they were . . . — Map (db m45908) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Commanding Officer's QuartersBuilding 1
During the Army era, the fort’s commander and his family lived in this beautiful stone structure. During the Hospital’s tenure, it was the residence of the Medical Officer in Charge. Over the years, it is the only building that has remained . . . — Map (db m86089) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Commissary WarehouseBuilding 12
Photo etchings caption: Building 12, torn down in 1930, was actually attached to Building 13. When it was taken down, a chunk of the roof fell into a lady’s bedroom. Originally built in 1855 of adobe, the building that occupied this . . . — Map (db m86189) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — L.G. Murphy Sutler Store
On the site located 100 yards west of this sign resided the L.G. Murphy Sutler Store (the post trader). Begun in 1866 by Lawrence G. Murphy and Emil Fritz (both former Dragoons stationed at Fort Stanton), it was a large, rambling, adobe structure of . . . — Map (db m123794) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Officer’s QuartersBuilding 4
Constructed in 1855, this building was originally a single story complex of four quarters for officers and their families. It has evolved over time to be more spacious and comfortable with a second story, bay windows and covered porches. Seen in the . . . — Map (db m86307) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Fort Stanton — Officer's QuartersBuilding 13
Built in 1855, as a single story, gabled roof structure of simple design and construction, this building housed officers and their families. It was here that 2nd Lieutenant John J. Pershing was quartered in 1887 and where he met his future wife. On . . . — Map (db m86734) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Glencoe — John H. TunstallMurder Site
In one of the Lincoln County War’s earliest violent encounters, John H. Tunstall was shot and killed at a nearby site on February 18, 1878. Tunstall’s death set off a series of violent reprisals between his friends, among whom was William . . . — Map (db m46009) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Col. Dudley's Camping Place
Encamped a few yards away on July 19, 1878 were U.S. troops from Fort Stanton. Allegedly brought to protect lives and property, their presence quickened Murphy party into firing McSween's residence and pillaging the Tunstall store. — Map (db m45989) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Lincoln
Side A: Spanish-speaking settlers established a town here in the 1850's, after the U. S. Army began to control the Mescalero Apaches. First known as Las Placitas del Rio Bonito, the name of the community was changed to Lincoln when . . . — Map (db m46007) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — 421 — Lincoln
This is a two-sided marker Side A: Spanish-speaking settlers established a town here in the 1850s, after the U.S. Army began to control the Mescalero Apaches. First known as Las Placitas del Río Bonito, the name of the community . . . — Map (db m119774) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Murphy-Dolan Store
Built in 1874, as place of business and residence of L.G. Murphy & Co., a dominant factor in area in 1870's, and headquarters of the Murphy faction during Lincoln County War. Firm failed, and store became county gov't and judicial center for 33 . . . — Map (db m119775) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Old Dolan Home
Built in 1888 by J.J. Dolan, who took part in the L.C. War on the Murphy side, and afterwards was conspicuous in county affairs. In later times the building served as a hotel, the most familiar name being Bonito Inn. — Map (db m45961) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Site of Squire Wilson's Home
South some 75 yds. was the lone adobe house of J.B. Wilson, noted J.P. in Lincoln Co. War. At night, Mar 17, 1879 he helped Gov. Lew Wallace meet with Bill Bonney, leader of remaining McSween men, and arranged a surrender under promise of protection. — Map (db m45969) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Site of the McSween Home
Opening a law office in Lincoln, 1875, Alex A. McSween rebuilt an old adobe into a ten room house. On July 19, 1878, Peppin's posse fired it to oust inmates. Leading victim of this strategm was McSween himself. The burned-down house was never . . . — Map (db m45992) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Lincoln — Tunstall-McSween Store
J.H. Tunstall and A. A. McSween erected-1877. A focal point in Lincoln County War in which both partners were slain. Despite looting by Seven Rivers group, building continued as a store under pioneer merchants, notably John M. Penfield. — Map (db m45991) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Ruidoso — Old Dowlin Mill
Part original structure. Famous landmark for 100 years. Originally grist and sawmill. Used as rendezvous by William H. Bonney (Billy, the Kid), Pat Garrett, Johnny Riley, J.J. Pershing (then Lt. at Ft. Stanton) and other historic figures. — Map (db m46014) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), Ruidoso Downs — Old Dowlin Mill
Famous New Mexico landmark for over 100 years. Original building still stands and water turns massive water wheel during the summer. Billy the Kid, Pat Garrett and General Pershing visited here. Turn on NM 48, 2.7 miles to west, then proceed 1.4 . . . — Map (db m46011) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), White Oaks — Susan McSween Barber“Cattle Queen of New Mexico” — 1845–1931 —
Her second husband was George Barber. Under the Desert Land Act, they patented 400 acres in 1883. The act required irrigating the land and in 1881 Susan built a dam across Three Rivers stream and a half-mile ditch to convey water to her property. By . . . — Map (db m103652) HM
New Mexico (Lincoln County), White Oaks — White Oaks
White Oaks grew rapidly after the discovery of gold in 1869. From tent city to bustling mining town, it was the largest town in Lincoln County with cultural events and an occasional bandit. Gold depletion and failure to grant railroad right-of-way . . . — Map (db m105813) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — Columbus
Columbus was founded in 1891 as a U.S./Mexico border station but eventually coalesced around the railroad station three miles to the north in 1903. The area’s history is tied to a March 9, 1916, raid on Columbus by Mexican revolutionary leader . . . — Map (db m37778) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — Pancho Villa State Park
Pancho Villa State Park commemorates the historic Columbus Raid of 1916. Ruins of Camp Furlong, headquarters for General John Pershing's expeditionary force, still exist at the park. The old Columbus Customs Service building has been restored to . . . — Map (db m81737) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Columbus — 390-B — Southern Pacific Railroad Depot
Now the site of the Columbus Historical Society Museum the depot was built c. 1902 by the El Paso & Southwestern Railroad which was merged with the Southern Pacific in 1924. Site No. 390-B A Registered Cultural Property State of New . . . — Map (db m37782) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — DemingElevation – 4,331 ft
In 1780, Governor Juan Bautista de Anza passed here while searching for a trade route between Santa Fe and the mines of Sonora, Mexico. Deming, named for Mary Anne Deming, was founded in 1881 when the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific Railroads were . . . — Map (db m38212) HM
New Mexico (Luna County), Deming — Mary Ann Deming CrockerNamesake of Deming — (1829-1889) —
This is a two-sided marker Front Side: Born in 1827, Mary Ann Deming was married to Charles Crocker, one of the founders of the Central Pacific Railroad. A “silver spike” was driven here in 1881 that commemorated . . . — Map (db m121958) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Mora — St. Vrain Mill
St. Vrain Mill The St. Vrain Mill is a stone, water-powered, vertical gristmill. The mill (molino de piedra in Spanish) was one of several in the Mora Valley that supplied flour and meal to nearby Fort Union in the mid-1800s. The mill was . . . — Map (db m145867) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Wagon Mound — Wagon Mound
This last great landmark on the Santa Fe Trail was named for its resemblance to the top of a covered wagon. At Wagon Mound, travelers could cross from the Cimarron Cutoff to Fort Union, which is located on the Mountain Branch of the Trail. The two . . . — Map (db m45824) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Watrous — Santa Fe Trail
Opened by William Becknell in 1821, the Santa Fe Trail became the major trade route to Santa Fe from Missouri River towns. The two main branches, the Cimarron Cutoff and the Mountain Branch, joined at Watrous. Travel over the Trail ceased with the . . . — Map (db m55199) HM
New Mexico (Mora County), Watrous — Watrous
The Mountain Branch and the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail meet at Watrous. This important spot on the Trail was first known at La Junta, "junction" in Spanish. In 1879, with the coming of the railroad, it was named for Samuel B. Watrous, a . . . — Map (db m55198) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Alamagordo — Disappearance of Albert J. Fountain and his son Henry
Albert Jennings Fountain was a Civil War veteran, New Mexico legislator and prominent lawyer. On February 1, 1896, Fountain and his eight-year-old son, Henry, were traveling home to Mesilla from Lincoln. They carried grand jury indictments against . . . — Map (db m46077) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), La Luz — La Luz
In 1719, Spanish Franciscan missionaries built a chapel here dedicated to Nuestra Señora de la Luz, Our Lady of the Light. The naming of the village is also attributed to the will o’wisp light in the canyon, a perpetually burning lamp in an . . . — Map (db m46073) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Three Rivers
Located in the Tularosa Basin east of the great lava flows known as the malpais, Three Rivers was once prominent in the cattle empires of Albert Bacon Fall, John S. Chisum, and Susie McSween Barber, “the cattle queen of New Mexico.” . . . — Map (db m46039) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Three Rivers
Located in the Tularosa Basin at the turn-off for Three Rivers Petroglyphs, this ranching village settled in the early 1870's took its name for a nearby convergence of three creeks. The cattle empires of Albert Bacon Fall, John Chisum, and Susan . . . — Map (db m91006) HM
New Mexico (Otero County), Tularosa — Tularosa
The Tularosa Basin has been occupied by Indian groups for thousands of years. The first Hispanic settlers moved here from the Rio Grande Valley in 1862. Anglo settlers and cattlemen began moving into the region in the 1870s. The original 1862 . . . — Map (db m46072) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Nara Visa — Nara VisaFounded 1902    Elevation 4200 ft.
The area is rich in prehistoric evidence, and home of the buffalo and Plains Indians. Explored by the early Spanish, the area was settled when the Rock Island Railroad was built thru in 1901. The brick building, built in 1921, was home for a fine . . . — Map (db m78866) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Nara Visa — Townsite of Obar
Founded in 1906 and at one time had a couple dozen buildings with all types of business found in early western towns including a newspaper called Obar Progress. A partial list of the several hundred pioneer families who homesteaded in the Obar . . . — Map (db m78867) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — TucumcariPopulation 6,765 – Elevation 4,096
This area was troubled by both Comanches and Comancheros, New Mexicans who traded illegally with the Indians, until the military campaigns of 1874. With the coming of the railroad in 1898, the small community of Liberty, eight miles to the north, . . . — Map (db m78868) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — TucumcariPopulation 6,765 - Elevation 4,096
This area was troubled by both Comanches and Comancheros, New Mexicans who traded illegally with the Indians, until the military campaigns of 1874. With the coming of the railroad in 1898, the small community of Liberty, eight miles to the north, . . . — Map (db m78888) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Tucumcari Mountain
Tucumcari Mountain has long been a landmark for travelers along the Canadian River. Pedro Vial mentioned it in 1793, while opening a trail between Santa Fe and St. Louis. In order to find the best route from Arkansas to California, Capt. Randolph . . . — Map (db m4378) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Tucumcari Mountain
Tucumcari Mountain has long been a landmark for travelers along the Canadian River. Pathfinder Pedro Vial mentioned it in 1793, while opening a trail between Santa Fe and St. Louis. In order to find the best route from Arkansas to California, Capt. . . . — Map (db m119938) HM
New Mexico (Quay County), Tucumcari — Tucumcari Mountain
Tucumcari Mountain has long been a landmark for travelers along the Canadian River. Pathfinder Pedro Vial mentioned it in 1793, while opening a trail between Santa Fe and St. Louis. In order to find the best route from Arkansas to California, Capt. . . . — Map (db m119940) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Alcalde — Historic Los Luceros
Historic Los Luceros includes a Pueblo Indian ruin and an 18th century rancho/hacienda on Sebastián Martin Serrano's 1703 land grant. Evolving out of family inheritance, local artistry and preservation efforts, the complex contains five adobe . . . — Map (db m45711) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Chimayo
Indians occupied the Chimayo valley centuries before the arrival of the Spaniards. The village of Chimayo, founded in the early 18th century, shortly after the reconquest of New Mexico, has been a center of the Spanish weaving tradition for over 250 . . . — Map (db m32819) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Cordova
Cordova, originally named Pueblo Quemado after a nearby burned-out Indian Pueblo, was permanently re-settled in 1750 after Indian attacks. It was renamed Cordova in 1900 after a prominent local family. The village chapel, San Antonio de Padua, is an . . . — Map (db m45675) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), El Rito — El RitoElevation 6,870 ft.
This village was settled in the 1830s by residents from the Abiquiú area. The Territorial Legislature of 1909 established the Spanish-American Normal School here to train teachers for northern New Mexico schools. After several changes in name and . . . — Map (db m73395) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Espanola — Española Valley
When it was described by Gaspar Castano de Sosa in 1591, the Española Valley contained about ten Tewa-speaking pueblos, several of which are still occupied today. Juan de Oñate established New Mexico’s first colony here in 1598. Long on the northern . . . — Map (db m45671) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Española — The Bond House
Frank Bond (1863-1945), prominent Española merchant, came from Canada in 1882. In 1887 Bond married May Anna Caffal of Pueblo, Colorado and built the home. The house grew from a two-room adobe to this large structure. Acquired by the city in 1957, . . . — Map (db m45665) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), San Juan Pueblo (Ohkay Owingeh) — San GabrielOn the Camino Real
Governor Juan de Oñate set up his headquarters in San Juan Pueblo in 1598, but by 1601 he had moved the Spanish capital across the Rio Grande to Yuque-Yunque Pueblo. Named San Gabriel, it served as the seat of government until 1610, when Oñate's . . . — Map (db m32877) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Santa Clara Pueblo — Pablita Velarde, Tse Tsan, Golden Dawn(1918-2006) — Santa Clara Pueblo —
Pablita Velarde was an internationally acclaimed artist whose paintings largely depicted Pueblo life. She was commissioned by the WPA art's program to paint murals at Bandelier National Monument. Selected as one of New Mexico's "Living Treasures", . . . — Map (db m45663) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Tierra Amarilla — Tierra Amarilla
Elevation 7,860 ft. In 1832 the Mexican government made a large community land grant to Manuel Martinez and other settlers but settlement was delayed by raids by Utes, Jicarilla Apaches and Navajos. Tierra Amarilla, first called Nutritas, . . . — Map (db m74256) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Tierra Amarilla — Tierra Amarilla
Elevation 7,860 ft. In 1832 the Mexican government made a large community land grant to Manuel Martinez and other settlers but settlement was delayed by raids by Utes, Jicarilla Apaches and Navajos. Tierra Amarilla, first called Nutritas, . . . — Map (db m74257) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Truchas — Truchas
In 1754, Governor Tomás Vélez Cachupín granted land on the Rio Truchas to families from Santa Cruz and Chimayó. Because Nuestra Señora de Rosario de Truchas was on the northern frontier, and subject to attack by Plains Indians, the governor . . . — Map (db m64915) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Velarde — VelardeOn the Camino Real
Founded in 1875, this small farming community was named La Jolla. It was once famous for finely woven blankets. Here the Camino Real left the Rio Grande and followed a canyon northeast to Embudo Creek where it began a climb over the mountains to . . . — Map (db m43810) HM
New Mexico (Roosevelt County), Portales — PortalesPopulation 9940 - Elevation 4004 ft.
Portales derives its name from the porch-like appearance of a cave entrance at nearby Portales Springs. It developed as a major peanut producing region in the early twentieth century, after the Pecos Valley Railroad opened the area for commercial . . . — Map (db m56117) HM
New Mexico (Roosevelt County), Portales — PortalesElevation 4004 ft.
Portales derives its name from the porch-like appearance of a cave entrance at nearby Portales Springs. It developed as a major peanut producing region in the early twentieth century, after the Pecos Valley Railroad opened the area for commercial . . . — Map (db m56120) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Bloomfield — City of Bloomfield
Prehistoric farmers established major communities along the rivers of this region in the eleventh century. Eight hundred years later, historic settlement was also made possible by abundant water. Bloomfield was established in 1879 near a site which . . . — Map (db m36460) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Farmington — 177 — Farmington, New Mexico
First settled 1876 to 1878 by families of William and Marion B. Hendrickson, Charles and Milton Virden, Orville Pyle, A.F. Miller and William Lock. The first school-house was built in 1879; the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1886. William Lock . . . — Map (db m22805) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Farmington — Footloose in Farmington:A Historic Perspective of Downtown
Farmington, New Mexico, the heart of the Four Corners, boasts a thriving downtown, where character, history and culture fuse in a mixture of places and events. Originally the land in what is now Northwest New Mexico was known as Tóta’ . . . — Map (db m22861) HM
New Mexico (San Juan County), Shiprock — Four Corners – A Common Bond
This is the only place in the United States marking the common corner of four states – Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. Who established this corner? The four corners monument was established and perpetuated by U.S. Government . . . — Map (db m36522) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Hogbacks
Interstate 25 cuts through dipping strata that form hogback ridges between the Great Plains and the south end of the Rocky Mountains. The Santa Fe Trail from here to Santa Fe, followed a natural valley eroded in less resistant strata between the . . . — Map (db m55196) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Las Vegas — Las VegasPopulation 16,507 - Elevation 6,470
Las Vegas served as an important stop on the Santa Fe Trail and later as a major railroad center. Here General Kearny announced the annexation of New Mexico by the U.S. in 1846. In 1862, during the Confederate occupation of Santa Fe, Las Vegas . . . — Map (db m45887) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Pecos — Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post
Built in 1810 — Map (db m65857) HM
New Mexico (San Miguel County), Sapello — Hermit’s PeakElevation– 10,212
From 1863 to 1867, this mountain was the home of Juan Maria Agostini, an Italian penitent who lived there as a hermit, carving crucifixes and religious emblems which he traded for food. Leaving this area, he moved to the Organ Mountains, in southern . . . — Map (db m73309) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Bernalillo — BernalilloOn the Camino Real — Population 2,763 - Elevation 5,050 —
The Pueblo Indian province of Tiguex, in the area of Bernalillo, served as winter headquarters for Francisco Vásquez de Coronado in 1540-42 during his explorations of the Southwest. Bernalillo was founded after the Spanish reconquest of New Mexico . . . — Map (db m45440) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Bernalillo — Bernalillo
Archaeological research indicates that this fertile valley has been the focus of human occupation for at least 10,000 years. Soon after the Spanish colonized New Mexico in 1598, a series of estancias, or farming and ranching communities, flanked the . . . — Map (db m45441) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Corrales — CorralesPopulation 2,791 - Elevation 5,097
(front of marker) Spanish colonization of this region, once the location of many Tiwa Indian pueblos, began in the 17th century. Corrales is named for the extensive corrals built here by Juan González, founder of Alameda. In the 18th . . . — Map (db m45436) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Cuba — Cuba
In 1769, Spanish Governor Pedro Fermin de Mendinueta made the San Joaquin del Nacimiento land grant to 35 pioneering families who had settled the headwaters of the Rio Puerco in 1766. The community was later abandoned owing to raids by frontier . . . — Map (db m73665) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Placitas — Las Placitas
English: The Sandia Mountains have been occupied by human beings for thousands of years. This area was settled by 1767, when Governor Pedro Fermin de Mendinueta made the land grant known as La Merced de San Antonio de las Huertas. The . . . — Map (db m45460) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Rio Rancho — Spanish Entrada Site
Among the many prehistoric and historic sites located nearby is a camp where Francisco Vasquez de Coronado’s troops may have spent the winter of 1540-41. Coronado also visited the ancient pueblo of Kuaua located to the north. Kuaua’s ruins are . . . — Map (db m45439) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Santo Domingo Pueblo — Pueblo of Santo Domingo Kiua
The Keresan people of Santo Domingo have occupied the area of the Rio Grande Valley since prehistoric times despite several floods that have forced relocation and reconstruction of the original pueblo. Strategically located along the roads that have . . . — Map (db m45476) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Santo Domingo Pueblo — The Mormon Battalion
The Mormon Battalion Council Bluffs, July 16, 1846 Fort Leavenworth, Aug. 2, 1846 Santa Fe, Oct. 9, 1846 San Diego, Jan 29, 1847 Erected June 16, 1940 [ Map of Mormon Battalion Route ] The Mormon Battalion, composed . . . — Map (db m32984) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Zia Pueblo — Pueblo of Zía
In 1583 Antonio de Espejo recorded this pueblo as one of five in the Province of Punamé. Following the sacking of Zia by Spanish troops in 1689, the pueblo was reestablished, but never attained its former size. The Zia ancient sun symbol is . . . — Map (db m32858) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Agua Fria Village — Agua Fria
Caravans entering and leaving Santa Fe on the Camino Real wound their way through scattered agricultural settlements south of the capital. Although this section of the Santa Fe River Valley was initially utilized as pasture for livestock, in the . . . — Map (db m40451) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Galisteo — Galisteo Pueblo
Spanish explorers found several Tano-speaking pueblos in the Galisteo Basin in 1540. They were among the leaders of the Pueblo Revolt in 1680. 150 Tano families were eventually resettled in Galisteo Pueblo in 1706. Droughts, famine, Comanche raids, . . . — Map (db m64819) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Pojoaque — Feliciana Tapia Viarrial (1904-1988)Pojoaque Pueblo
Feliciana Tapia Viarrial helped establish today's Pueblo of Pojoaque. Pojoaque, or Posuwageh, water drinking place, is a Tewa village founded circa A.D. 900. By 1919, the Pojoaque homelands were severely diminished. Most members left . . . — Map (db m32835) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Cruz — Santa Cruz de la Cañada / Santa Cruz Plaza on the Camino Real
(side one) Santa Cruz de la Cañada In 1695, Governor Diego de Vargas founded his first town, Santa Cruz de la Cañada, designed to protect the Spanish frontier north of Santa Fe. The church, which still stands, was constructed in . . . — Map (db m45673) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 3 — 1598 — Commemorative Walkway Park —
The viceroy of New Spain appointed Juan de Oñate as New Mexico’s first governor and directed him to settle the area along the upper Rio Grande. Accompanied by 200 settlers and over 7,000 head of livestock, Oñate arrived in New Mexico and established . . . — Map (db m76183) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 6 — 1692 — Commemorative Walkway Park —
Under the direction of Don Diego de Vargas, the Spanish returned to recapture New Mexico after twelve years of exile in El Paso. In an attempt to encourage settlement of the land in the Rio Grande Valley, Don Diego de Vargas issued land grants for . . . — Map (db m76222) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 7 — 1712 — Commemorative Walkway Park —
In order to fulfill a promise that Don Diego de Vargas made, the government leaders of Santa Fe issued a proclamation calling for an annual fiesta to commemorate the peaceful reentry of the Spanish into Santa Fe in 1692. This annual celebration held . . . — Map (db m76236) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — 375th Anniversary of Santa FeA Gift to Visitors — Commemorative Walkway Park —
Santa Fe is the oldest capital city in the United States, a successful blend of three cultures and yet a modern city of over 50,000 residents. The Commemorative Walkway Park, constructed in 1986, provides a historical walk through Santa Fe . . . — Map (db m76131) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Don Diego de Vargas Zapata Luján Ponce de León, El Marques de la Nava de Barcinas1643–1704 — Resettled New Mexico Twelve Years after Pueblo Revolt of 1680 —
Don Diego de Vargas Zapata Luján Ponce de León, born 1643 in Madrid, Spain, served the crown as Governor of New Mexico from 1691–1697 and 1703–1704. Vargas was a devout Christian with a strong devotion to Nuestra Señora La Conquistadora, . . . — Map (db m76234) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — El Palacio Real
Fortress and Castle built by order of the Spanish crown 1610-1612 Seat of Government under three flags–Spanish, Mexican & American- From 1610 to 1910 the residence of over a hundred Governors & Captains General The . . . — Map (db m45588) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Hitching Post at the End of the Trail1776 – 1976
Roadrunner Cowbelles dedicate this hitching post at the end of the trail to American cattlemen and their horses for their glorious role in winning the West. — Map (db m72745) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa FeOn the Camino Real — Population 58,000 - Elevation 7,045 —
Santa Fe, the oldest capital city in the United States, was established in 1610 as the seat of the Spanish colonial government for the Province of New Mexico. The Palace of the Governors, used by the Spanish, Mexican, and Territorial governors, has . . . — Map (db m45575) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa Fe Plaza
Santa Fe Plaza has been designated a National Historic Landmark The heart of Santa Fe since its founding by Spanish colonial Governor Don Pedro De Peralta in 1609-1610, this public space was a terminus of El Camino Real and the . . . — Map (db m71579) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa Fe Trail
This marks the route of the Santa Fe Trail, Kansas City to Santa Fe. 1822–1880. — Map (db m61884) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Seton Village
Ernest Thompson Seton (1860-1946), naturalist, artist, writer, authority on Indian lore, and first Chief Scout of the Boy Scouts of America, lived here during the last part of his life. The village includes his home, art collection, library, and . . . — Map (db m55151) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — The Founding of Santa FeDon Pedro De Peralta — 1610 —
(right tablet) On March 30, 1609, the Viceroy of New Spain appointed Don Pedro de Peralta Governor and Captain-General of New Mexico, instructing him to proceed to New Mexico with the greatest dispatch accompanied by twelve soldiers and . . . — Map (db m76340) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Hillsboro — HillsboroHistoric District
Hillsboro was founded in the 1870’s after gold and silver was discovered in the surrounding Black Range. The town developed into an important mining and ranching center, and served as the Sierra County seat from 1884 to 1939. It was the site of . . . — Map (db m38207) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Truth or ConsequencesPopulation 7,289 – Elevation 4,576
In 1581, Capitán Francisco Sánchez Chamuscado took possession of this region for the King of Spain, naming it the Province of San Felipe. Significant European settlement of the area, however, did not occur until the mid-1800s. Once called Hot . . . — Map (db m45108) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Truth or ConsequencesElevation 4,576 ft.
In 1581, Capitan Franciso Sanchez Chamuscado took possession of this region for the King of Spain naming it Ojo de Zoquete (mud spring) in the province of San Felipe. Native Americans first used these springs for healing; in early 20th century, . . . — Map (db m45122) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), La Joya — La Joya de Sevilleta
Present-day La Joya is located near the site of an ancient Piro Indian Pueblo that the Spanish named Nueva Sevilla, or Sevilleta. During the eighteenth century, this was the southernmost settlement along the Camino Real before the travelers ended . . . — Map (db m67105) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Lemitar — Sabino y Lemitar
The Camino Real passed near here below the bluffs on the east bank of the Rio Grande. Apache raids prevented permanent Spanish settlement of this area until the early 1800s, when the village of Sabino was established on the east bank of the river . . . — Map (db m45178) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Kelly
Silver was discovered in Kelly around 1866 and the town site was laid out in circa 1879. Kelly boomed with silver mining and eventually zinc mining, becoming one of central New Mexico's most prosperous mining towns. At one time it boasted a . . . — Map (db m38862) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Magdalena
Magdalena is located in a mineral-rich area which became a center of silver mining in the 1860's. In 1885, a railroad was built to the smelter in Socorro, and Magdalena became an important railhead for cattle, sheep, and ore. — Map (db m38860) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Riley
Twenty miles north of Magdalena, Riley was a small agricultural village originally named Santa Rita by its Hispanic founders in the mid-nineteenth century. By the late 1880's mining drove the town's economy and in 1890 it was granted a post office . . . — Map (db m124672) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Acacia — Doña Eufemia"La Valerosa" — The Spanish Entrada of 1598 —
Traveling with the colonizing expedition of Juan de Oñate, Doña Eufemia rallied Spanish soldiers to persevere when morale broke down during their long journey on the Camino Real. Settling in present-day New Mexico, she rallied 22 women to defend the . . . — Map (db m100056) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — Carthage-Tokay-Farley
In the 1860s, a coal field east of San Antonio was occasionally mined by soldiers for heating fuel and to fire their blacksmith ovens. In 1883, the Santa Fe railroad built a bridge across the Rio Grande at San Antonio and laid track to the new coal . . . — Map (db m45175) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — San AntonioOn the Camino Real
Established in the mid 1600s, the mission of San Antonio de Senecú was the last outpost on the Camino Real before the Mesilla Valley to the south. Around 1820 Hispano settlers from the north re-occupied the area after the Pueblo Revolt. Conrad . . . — Map (db m45172) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — San Pedro
Established in the 1840s on the east bank of the Rio Grande, San Pedro became an important trading center along the Camino Real. The sister village of San Antonio, it was once known for its extensive vineyards and other agricultural produce. The . . . — Map (db m45174) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Paraje De Fra Cristobal
The mountain range seen along the east bank of the Rio Grande is named after Father Cristobal de Salazar of the 1598 Juan de Oñate expedition. The northern edge of the twenty-one mile range is said to resemble the profile of the good friar. This . . . — Map (db m45132) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Socorro
The Piro Indian pueblo Teypana was visited by Juan de Oñate in 1598. The people of the village reportedly supplied corn to Oñate who bestowed the name Socorro ("aid" in Spanish) on the pueblo. In 1626, the mission of Nuestra Señora de Socorro was . . . — Map (db m38462) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Socorro
In 1598, Juan de Oñate's Spanish colonization expedition arrived here at the Piro Indian Pueblo of Pilabo, They renamed it Socorro owning to the food and shelter provided by Pilabo's inhabitants. The pueblo and its Spanish mission were destroyed . . . — Map (db m45177) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Women of the Camino Real
Front of Marker In 1598 the first Spanish settlers in New Mexico traveled up the Camino Real from north-central Mexico. Of the 560 people so far identified on that expedition, at least 20 percent were women. They came on foot, on wagons or . . . — Map (db m45131) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Veguita — Las Nutrias
During the late 17th century, this area had become well known to the Spanish. Called La Vega de Las Nutrias, or meadow of the beavers, it was a welcome paraje, or stopping place, for caravans on the Camino Real. Eighteenth century attempts at . . . — Map (db m67080) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), White Sands Proving Grounds — McDonald Ranch House Trinity SiteNational Historic Landmark — 1972 —
Restored by US Army White Sands Missile Range US Department of Energy National Park Service 1984 In the front room of this humble ranch house the world's first nuclear device was assembled on 13 July 1945. The device was then taken to Trinity . . . — Map (db m15072) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Pilar — Pilar
In 1795, twenty-five families were granted land along the Río Grande at Pilar, then known as Cieneguilla. The Battle of Cieneguilla was fought at Embudo Mountain near here in March 1854. A large force of Utes and Apaches inflicted heavy losses on . . . — Map (db m69869) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Rancho de Taos — Captive Women and Children of Taos County / María Rosa Villapando, (ca. 1725-1830)
(side one) Captive Women and Children of Taos County In August 1760, around sixty women and children were taken captive in a Comanche raid on Ranchos de Taos. That raid is an example of the danger of living on New Mexico's . . . — Map (db m45719) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Rancho de Taos — William J. KlauerFebruary 15, 1909 – February 21, 2001 — In Honor and Memory of —
The Klauer family of Dubuque, Iowa, stewards of the Taba Valley Overlook since 1920, transferred ownership of this property to the U.S. Bureau of Land Management on March 31, 2001, with the help of the Trust for Public Land and the Taos Land Trust. . . . — Map (db m64879) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Don Fernando de Taos
The Town of Taos was originally established on May 1, 1796 when 63 families who had petitioned Governor Don Fernando Chacón were placed in possession of the Don Fernando de Taos land grant by the Alcalde of the Pueblo of Taos, Antonio José Ortíz. . . . — Map (db m66698) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Don Fernando de Taos Plaza
This peaceful and historic plaza, shaded by cottonwood trees in summer and blanketed by snow in winter has been the site of military action, fiestas, and fiery speeches. Spanish colonists settled at scattered locations in this valley beginning . . . — Map (db m66543) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Historic Taos
Welcome visitors and Taosenos! You are invited to explore the diversity of this region through a self-guided tour. The two-hundred- year-old Taos Plaza, including the streets that radiate from it like spokes, forms the National Historic District of . . . — Map (db m66702) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Historic Taos Plaza
Capitan Hernan Alvarado and his conquistadors from the famous Francisco Vasquez de Coronado Expedition arrived here on August 29, 1540. It is estimated that the Tiwa Indians settled in this valley around 1350 A.D. The name Taos is believed to be an . . . — Map (db m66697) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Ledoux Street — Historic District —
Ledoux Street was named after the French trapper and guide Antonine Ledoux, who settled in the area around 1844. Earlier the street was named after Charles Beaubien and then later Smith H. Simpson. The area was developed in the fortress style with . . . — Map (db m66865) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — Padre Antonio José Martínez1793 – 1867
Born in Abiquiu, New Mexico, on January 17, 1793 to Don Severino Martínez and María del Carmen Santistevan (Martinez Hacienda), the life of the Presbyter Don Antonio José Martínez extended through the Spanish (1793-1820), Mexican (1821-1846), and . . . — Map (db m66666) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Taos — TaosPopulation 3369 — Elevation 6983 ft.
The Spanish community of Taos developed two miles southwest of Taos Pueblo. It later served as a supply base for the “Mountain Men,” and was the home of Kit Carson who is buried here. Governor Charles Bent was killed here in the . . . — Map (db m66466) HM
New Mexico (Taos County), Trampas — Las Trampas
The village of Las Trampas was established in 1751 by 12 families from Santa Fe, led by Juan de Argüello, who received a land grant from Governor Tomás Vélez Cachupín. The church of San José de Gracia is one of the finest surviving . . . — Map (db m32123) HM
New Mexico (Torrance County), Cedarvale — Cedarvale
Edward Smith, William Taylor and Oliver P. DeWolfe of Cedarvale Kansas laid out this community in 1908. Hundreds of homesteaders arrived on immigrant trains. Most farmed pinto beans, shipping their crops to distant markets. In 1917 the community . . . — Map (db m72667) HM

219 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers were listed. Next 19
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 8, 2020