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Settlements & Settlers Historical Markers

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Slaves at Oak Grove image, Touch for more information
By Patrick G. Jordan, June 14, 2014
Slaves at Oak Grove
North Carolina (Alamance County), Alamance — Oak Grove Plantation
Oak Grove (ca. 1790-1910) was a 1,693-acre grain farm owned by the Holt family. The Holts were pioneers in the southern textile industry and developers of "Alamance Plaid" fabrics. While textiles made the Holts one of the wealthiest families in . . . — Map (db m74439) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Alamance — Oak Grove Plantation — 1790-1910
1693 acre grain plantation founded by Michael Holt III (1778-1842). Birthplace of E.M. Holt (1807-1884), a founder of the southern textile industry and developer of "Alamance Plaid" fabrics. Dr. William Rainey Holt (1798-1868), noted "scientific . . . — Map (db m74448) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — A Legacy of Community
Following the labor turbulence of the 1930s and the strain of the Great Depression, World War II brought relative calm and increased productivity to the mill communities. Immediately after the War, however, mill owners revived a movement that had . . . — Map (db m32846) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — African Americans in the Mill Village
African Americans experienced the textile mill world very differently than white families. Mills did not offer the same work opportunities to black men and women as they did for whites. Life in the mill village was also restricted, and black workers . . . — Map (db m32783) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Calling the Mill Village 'Home'
Mill owners initially built villages near textile mills to attract families of workers. By 1900, 92% of workers lived in mill-owned housing. A typical mill village in the 1920s consisted of about 350 houses located within walking distance of the . . . — Map (db m32830) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Cotton Dust and Poverty
Although industrialization brought great improvements to the South, advancements in health and medicine lagged dramatically behind. Without antibiotics, infectious diseases were common and dangerous. Medical care was often unavailable, and employers . . . — Map (db m33273) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Living in a Mill-Centered World
In the village, every aspect of the workers’ lives revolved around the mill. In addition to their homes, the churches, schools, and stores all belonged or were tied to the mill owners. While these places provided much needed social time for mill . . . — Map (db m33320) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Men in the Mill Village
Transitioning from the farm to an industrialized way of life was especially hard for men. On the farm, men experienced a certain amount of freedom and variety; millwork was often tedious, repetitive, and produced only wages for a day's labor. Men . . . — Map (db m32775) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Neighbors Divided
Industrialization came to the South later than it had in the North. The first generation of mill workers were transplanted farmers who had no tradition of labor unions. The nature of the mill village also made organized labor difficult. The mill . . . — Map (db m33311) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — St. Paul's Lutheran Church
On Colonial Trading Path Travelers used nearby spring Preaching point 1759 Originally called "Graves Church" Church founded circa 1770 Burials from early period in rock enclosed cemetery Recorded burials from 1790 Called "the Chappel" . . . — Map (db m32156) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — The John Allen House
Quaker John Allen constructed this log dwelling circa 1780 in nearby Snow Camp. The State of North Carolina moved it here in 1966, restored it, and opened it to the public in 1967 to illustrate colonial life in the backcountry of North Carolina. The . . . — Map (db m42253) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — G 33 — Trading Path
Colonial trading route, dating from 17th century, from Petersburg, Virginia, to Catawba and Waxhaw Indians in Carolina, passed nearby. — Map (db m28700) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Women in the Mill Village
The first waves of migration off the farms were primarily single women and widows. Since these women had limited access to land, they were eager to take the steady work and housing the textile mills provided. An example of this was Bynum, North . . . — Map (db m32792) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Graham — Providence Church & Cemetery — First building erected c. 1763
Side A Providence was a gathering spot for pioneers in the Haw River basin. Many families and denominations during the eighteenth century used this cemetery. Many early settlers including members of the Turrentine, Sellars, Holt, Harden, . . . — Map (db m28277) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Mebane — G 30 — Hawfields Church
Presbyterian, founded about 1755, three miles N.E. Henry Patillo the first pastor. Present building erected 1852. — Map (db m29337) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Mebane — G 34 — Trading Path
Colonial trading route, dating from 17th century, from Petersburg, Virginia, to the Catawba and Waxhaw Indians in Carolina, passed nearby. — Map (db m28822) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Saxapahaw — Saxapahaw
. . . — Map (db m30264) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — G 69 — Cane Creek Meeting
First Monthly Meeting of Friends in central North Carolina, 1751. Present building is on the original site. — Map (db m30487) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — G 76 — Snow Camp
Settled by Quakers in 1749. Cornwallis camped in area after Battle of Guilford Courthouse and used home of Simon Dixon as headquarters. — Map (db m32292) HM
North Carolina (Alleghany County), Sparta — Tillers of the Land - Then and Now — Blue Ridge Parkway
For thousands of years Native Americans cultivated the fertile valleys of the Blue Ridge region including North Carolina. Employing techniques such as “slash and burn” to clear small areas of forested land and fertilize the soil, the . . . — Map (db m123230) HM
North Carolina (Anson County), Morven — K-7 — Sneedsborough
Laid out 1795. Promoted as inland port town on Pee Dee River by Archibald D. Murphey. Only graveyard remains, five miles southeast. — Map (db m42309) HM
North Carolina (Ashe County), Grassy Creek — M 15 — North Carolina / Virginia
(obverse) North Carolina Colonized, 1585-87, by first English settlers in America; permanently settled c. 1650; first to vote readiness for independence, Apr. 12, 1776 (reverse) Virginia First permanent English . . . — Map (db m95737) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — Colonial Bath
Bath, originally the Indian town of Pampticough, was settled by white men about 1690 and incorporated in 1705. It is the oldest town in North Carolina. Its first commissioners were John Lawson, Joel Martin, and Simon Alderson. Here was . . . — Map (db m64799) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — BB-1 — Colonial Bath
Bath, oldest town in North Carolina, was established in 1705. The first settlers were French Huguenots from Virginia. Among the early English inhabitants were John Lawson, author of the first history of Carolina (1709) and Christopher Gale, Chief . . . — Map (db m67574) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — B-47 — Edward Teach
Notorious pirate called "Blackbeard." Lived in Bath while Charles Eden was governor. Killed at Ocracoke, 1718. — Map (db m64796) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — BB-2 — Historic Bath
(MAP OF TOWN OF BATH) Bath, the oldest incorporated town in North Carolina, was established in 1705. By the 1708 the town consisted of twelve houses and a population of fifty people. Among the early inhabitants were John Lawson, Surveyor General . . . — Map (db m67575) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — BB-3 — Palmer-Marsh House
Colonial home of Colonel Robert Palmer, Surveyor-General of North Carolina 1753-1771 and Collector of Customs for the Port of Bath. Built c. 1744, probably by Michael Coutanche, it is one of the oldest surviving dwelling-houses in the State. . . . — Map (db m66701) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — B-62 — Port Of Bath
Colony's first town, incorporated March 8, 1705. Home to first port of entry, 1716; exported naval stores. — Map (db m65501) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), near Bunyan — B-8 — Granville Grant
Formed northern half of colony of North Carolina. Its southern boundary was surveyed in 1743 to a point near here. — Map (db m65275) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Washington — Washington, North Carolina
To commemorate the 200th Anniversary of Washington, North Carolina The first town in the United States to be named for General George Washington Originally known as "town at the forks of the Tar River." It was settled . . . — Map (db m70505) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Merry Hill — A-10 — Salmon Creek and Eden House: Seedbed of the Colony
Along the banks of the Chowan River and Salmon Creek, the seeds were planted for the colony and state of North Carolina. From these roots in the 1600s emerged the refined plantation life of the ruling colonial gentry in the 1700s, made possible by . . . — Map (db m56927) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Gray’s Landing
William Gray in 1776 set aside 100 acres at Gray’s Landing for establishing a town. 18th century travelers would have disembarked from sailing vessels docked at the foot of King Street at the old Gray’s Landing site. Visitors to Windsor today, . . . — Map (db m60629) HM
North Carolina (Bertie County), Windsor — Historic Windsor
Created by an act of Colonial Assembly in 1768, New Windsor was established on the site known as Gray’s Landing. A part of grants to the Lords Proprietors, 2800 acres on the Cashie River were sold in 1717 by John Lord Carteret, Earl of Granville to . . . — Map (db m60630) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Carolina Shores — D 29 — South Carolina / North Carolina
South Carolina Formed in 1712 from part of Carolina, which was chartered in 1663, it was first settled by the English in 1670. One of the 13 original states. North Carolina Colonized, 1585-87, b first English settlers in America; . . . — Map (db m39649) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Old Town — D-48 — Charles Town
Center of a colony from Barbados led by John Vassall, 1664. Abandoned by 1667. Was located 2 miles east on Town Creek. — Map (db m101439) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Shallotte — Shallotte
Established late 1700’s. Incorporated March6, 1899. The Shallotte River was navigated by commercial sailing vessels until the 1920’s when the roads were built. First church building erected on this site circa 1799. — Map (db m28823) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Smithville — D-14 — Arthur Dobbs — 1689–1765
Royal Governor 1754–65. Scholar, engineer, and member of Irish Parliament. Promoted immigration to colony. Grave 2 miles south. — Map (db m6436) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Southport — D-110 — Stede Bonnet — 1688–1718
Barbadian planter turned pirate made North Carolina his base, 1718. Captured in naval battle few miles east. Hanged in Charleston. — Map (db m101979) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Winnabow — D-53 — Orton Plantation
House built c. 1725, subsequent additions. Home first of Roger Moore, later of Gov. Benjamin Smith, still later of James Sprunt. Ύ miles east. — Map (db m6448) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Ashe Monument
Dedicated to the memory of Samuel Ashe 1725 - 1813 Distinguished North Carolinian Governor, Statesman and Jurist in whose honor the City of Asheville was named — Map (db m30120) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Crossroads
Native American trails guided settlers to this site, where in 1793 the Buncombe County Court placed the first courthouse, prison, and stocks. With the opening of the Buncombe Turnpike in 1827, this public square became a crossroads for stagecoach . . . — Map (db m97553) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P 37 — Rutherford Trace
The expedition led by Gen. Griffith Rutherford against the Cherokee, September, 1776, passed nearby on the banks of the Swannanoa River. — Map (db m2279) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — The Early Years In Asheville's Historic Central Square
Buncombe County was carved out of a magnificent mountain landscape etched by indigenous trails and scattered settlements. The bill creating the county was ratified on January 14, 1792. In 1793, the county's first official courthouse, a jail and . . . — Map (db m98370) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Bent Creek — French Broad River
The French Broad River played a major role in this region’s early development. Initially called the “Broad River” by eighteenth-century French hunters and traders, it was later named the French Broad River. With headwaters on Pisgah . . . — Map (db m58937) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Enka Village — Home Place of Capt. Wm. Moore
Here on land granted him in 1787. He erected the first house of white settlers west of the Blue Ridge. Capt. Moore and his troops camped near here when on the Rutherford Expedition against the Cherokee in 1776. Erected by Unaka . . . — Map (db m56431) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Morganton — N-47 — Fort San Juan
Built by Juan Pardo in 1567 at native town of Joara. Served as Spanish outpost until razed by Indians, 1568. NE 4 mi. — Map (db m99608) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — The Waldensian Colony
To the Waldensian Colony from the Cottian Alps. who settled here first in 1893 numbering in all 427, in recognition of their Christian ideals, integrity, industry and good citizenship this monument is erected, by the Town of Valdese. And . . . — Map (db m20336) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — Valdese Centennial Park — Legend of Plaques
First Marker:Centennial Seal Official Seal of the 100th Celebration of the founding of Valdese Future From an agrarian beginning through Industrial growth, comes a bright horizon Civic Citizens Band together . . . — Map (db m20396) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — N 2 — Waldenses
A religious body dating from the middle ages. The town of Valdese was founded by members of this group in 1893. — Map (db m20335) HM
North Carolina (Cabarrus County), Kannapolis — L-13 — Granville Grant
Formed northern half of colony of North Carolina. Southern boundary surveyed to a point near here in the fall of 1746. — Map (db m42557) HM
North Carolina (Catawba County), Hickory — Henry Weidner Robinson
Commemorating the memory of Henry Weidner Robinson This marks the town of Hickory Tavern as incorporated December 12, 1863. The city of Hickory Commemorates Henry Weidner Robinson who in 1859 gave this site as a public common. The citizens of . . . — Map (db m18544) HM
North Carolina (Catawba County), Hickory — Old Hickory Tavern — Birthplace of Hickory
To the rear of this spot stood a log house known in 1799 as Hickory Tavern. This tract of 640 acres was surveyed by Col. Christopher W. Beekman on June 8, 1779 and was granted to William McMullen Oct. 28, 1783 on the south side of this tavern ran . . . — Map (db m18538) HM
North Carolina (Chatham County), Moncure — H-14 — Granville Grant
Formed northern half of colony of North Carolina. Southern boundary was surveyed to a point just south of here in 1746. — Map (db m48383) HM
North Carolina (Cherokee County), Murphy — Cherokee Heritage Trails — ~Tsalagi Usdi Nvnohi~
Cherokee Heritage Trails (Tsalagi Usdi Nvnohi) wind through the mountains of North Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia, in the heart of Cherokee homelands that once encompassed more than 140,000 square miles. Here, where Cherokee people have lived . . . — Map (db m134947) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Kings Mountain — William Andrew Mauney House — Local Historic Landmark —
An early settler to Kings Mountain, William Andrew Mauney built a store on this site circa 1870. When Mr. Mauney moved his business to a location in downtown Kings Mountain, he turned the store ninety degrees and added a two story structure to the . . . — Map (db m17703) HM
North Carolina (Columbus County), Tabor City — Mt. Tabor
Baptist Church est. here in 1840. Community settled in 1850’s. Railroad terminus located, 1886. Incorporated 1805. Charter changed to Tabor City, 1935. Former “Yam Capital” of the World. — Map (db m862) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), Fort Barnwell — C-32 — Fort Barnwell
Constructed by Colonel John Barnwell of South Carolina in campaign against the Tuscarora Indians in April, 1712. Remains are 2 mi. N. E. — Map (db m65699) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — Abner Nash
A resident of New Bern for fifteen years; born in Prince Edward County, Virginia, about 1740, but came to North Carolina in 1763; member of Colonial Assembly from Halifax Town in 1764 and 1765; from the County of Halifax in 1769, 1770 and 1771; . . . — Map (db m23831) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — C-10 — Baron Christoph von Graffenried
Was a citizen of Bern, Switzerland. Led Swiss and Palatine immigrants to N.C. where in 1710 he founded New Bern. — Map (db m92398) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-54 — Campbelton
Colonial river port, incorporated in 1762. Later merged with Cross Creek to form the town of Fayetteville. — Map (db m30872) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-10 — Cross Creek
Colonial village and trading center, merged in 1778 with town of Campbelton and in 1783 renamed Fayetteville. — Map (db m24394) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Cross Creek Linear Park — Our Pathway to the Future
1. Cool Spring Cool Spring is located on the south bank of Cross Creek, which winds its way through downtown Fayetteville. The spring was the primary soucre of water first for Native Americans and subsequently for the European pioneers. It . . . — Map (db m31149) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Flora MacDonald
Scottish heroine resided here 1774 - 1775 — Map (db m24445) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Parade Ground — Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry
The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry is North Carolina's oldest military unit and the second-oldest militia organization in the U.S. At the start of the Civil War, after North Carolina seceded, the company enrolled in active service for . . . — Map (db m31109) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-21 — Plank Roads
Fayetteville was the focal point for five plank roads, chartered 1849-52. The longest was built to Bethania, 129 miles northwest. — Map (db m24395) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Scotch Spring
Located one block to the north, on the north side of Maiden Lane, Scotch Spring was owned by two prominent citizens, Robert Cochran and John Hay, and was a major water source for Fayetteville in the late eighteenth century. Throughout the nineteenth . . . — Map (db m30998) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Settlement of the Upper Cape Fear
[Thistle symbol] Commemorating the settlement of the Upper Cape Fear by the Highland Scotch Two Hundredth Anniversary — Map (db m31148) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Corolla Historic Village
Twiddy & Company began preservation in Corolla Village in 1986. The first effort was the Kill Devil Hills Lifesaving Station built in 1878. Relocation from the original oceanfront site was a requirement of the sale, so the station was moved to . . . — Map (db m76660) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Corolla Schoolhouse — C. 1900
Restoration began in the fall of 1999, revealing wonderful insights into life in this isolated coastal village. Upon raising the building to repair rotten sills, workers discovered ship timbers in the foundation that were salvaged from . . . — Map (db m10434) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Corolla Schoolhouse
Establishing the First Unified Corolla School The Corolla Schoolhouse was built circa 1890 by residents Sol Sanderlin and Val Twiford and established as the first unified Corolla school in 1905. The County's one-room schoolhouse accepted . . . — Map (db m76658) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — First Swimming Pool on the Outer Banks
The Whalehead Club has always been associated with wealth and leisure pursuits. When Edward Collings Knight Jr. and his wife, Marie-Louise LeBel, built their residence here in the 1920s, they made it as opulent as possible. The estate included the . . . — Map (db m10687) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Ray T. Adam's Landing Strip
When Ray T. Adams bought this estate for just $25,000 in 1940, he dreamed of opening a hunt club and selling parcels of land for real estate. He changed the name to the Whalehead Club and invited potential investors, politicians (including Dwight . . . — Map (db m10688) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — The Caretaker's Residence
Architectural drawings suggest that the caretaker's residence dates to the 1920s and was designed to house two families who worked for the Knights. Cleveland lewark, chief hunting guide and superintendent of the property, lived in one side of the . . . — Map (db m10689) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — The Knights
Due to excellent wildfowl hunting conditions in the second half of the 19th century, private hunt clubs owned most of the land on the Currituck Outer Banks. In 1874 a group of wealthy Northeaster industrialists build the Lighthouse Club just south . . . — Map (db m10690) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — The Whalehead Club Restoration
After second owner Ray T. Adams died in 1957, the Whalehead Club was used as a summer boy's school, housed a rocket fuel testing facility, and was proposed for resort development. With restoration in mind, Currituck County purchased the club in . . . — Map (db m10691) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Currituck — Currituck County Old Jail
Thursday the 31st December 1767 "On motion the following Bills were ordered to be read ... A Bill to impower the justices of Currituck County to build a prison pillary and stocks in the said county on the lot were the Court House stands for the . . . — Map (db m9468) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — B-44 — Andrew Cartwright
Agent of the American Colonization Society in Liberia, founded the A. M. E. Zion Churches in Albemarle area. His first church, 1865, near here. — Map (db m9462) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Deliverance
Thus saith the Lord, Let my people go.           Exodus 8:1 The bloodbath called the Civil War had begun and would cost the lives of over 600,000 Americans. As the Union armies advanced south, refugee slaves followed. After the . . . — Map (db m9669) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — B-1 — First English Colonies
Explored in 1584. Site of first English settlements in new world, 1585-1587. Birthplace of Virginia Dare, first child born of English parents in America. — Map (db m11343) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — First Light of Freedom — The Freedmen’s Colony of Roanoke Island — National Underground Railroad - Network To Freedom —
[obverse:]First Light of Freedom Former slaves give thanks by the creek’s edge at the sight of the island - “If you can cross the creek to Roanoke Island, you will find ‘safe haven’.” [rendering of Edwin Forbes' "The . . . — Map (db m46990) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — The New Fort in Virginia / Virginia Dare
On this site, in July – August, 1585 (O.S.), colonists, sent out from England by Sir Walter Raleigh, built a fort, called by them “The New Fort in Virginia” These colonists were the first settlers of the English race in . . . — Map (db m9460) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — City of Lexington — Incorporated 1828
Named during the Revolutionary War in 1775 after the Battle of Lexington. — Map (db m34388) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — Daniel Boone and Gen. Nathanael Greene
In 1750, Daniel Boone, age 16, came with his father from Pennsylvania and settled near Boone’s Ford on Yadkin River, then in Rowan, now Davidson County. Near this spot, in 1781, the American Army under Gen. Nathanael Greene passed on its way from . . . — Map (db m34377) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — K 56 — Wm. Rainey Holt
Physician. Advocate of scientific agriculture. His plantation “Linwood” was 6 miles southwest. Built home here, 1834. — Map (db m34193) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — K 35 — John W. Thomas — 1800-1871
Founder of Thomasville. As legislator led fight for N.C. Railroads; friend of education. His home, Cedar Lodge, was nearby. — Map (db m70002) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — John W. Thomas
Site of the home place of John W. Thomas Founder of the city of Thomasville, 1857
"John W. Thomas, the founder of Thomasville, lived in “a grand mansion” in the center of town, across the street from the town commons. . . . — Map (db m70005) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — Thomasville — A Key Stop & Refuge
John W. Thomas, who represented this area in the state legislature in the mid-1800s, laid out the town of Thomasville in 1852 on the proposed route of the North Carolina Railroad. Three years later, the line was completed to the new town, and the . . . — Map (db m70006) HM WM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Boone Memorial — This Memorial Erected To — Daniel Boone | Squire and Sarah Boone —
Daniel Boone Hunter, Explorer Backwoodsman, Soldir Surveyor Roadbuilder Legislator, Magistrate He lived and learned woodcraft in Davie County 1750-65

Squire and Sarah Boone Parents of Daniel Boone Pioneers of the Yadkin whose . . . — Map (db m53211) HM

North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — M-47 — Boone Tract
In 1753 Lord Granville granted 640 acres on Bear Creek to Squire Boone who sold it in 1759 to his son Daniel. This was a part of the original Boone tract. — Map (db m53197) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Daniel Boone / Greene and Cornwalis
. . . — Map (db m102511) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — M-3 — Daniel Boone's Parents
Squire and Sarah Boone are buried here. Daniel Boone, 1734-1820, lived many years in this region. — Map (db m53190) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — The Boone Family in Davie County
On 04 October 1750, Squire Boone received a Land Warrant and Survey for a 640-acre tract "lying...upon Grant's Creek, alias Lickon (Licking) Creek" in present Davie County. He received a grant for this 640 acres on the present Elisha and Dutchman . . . — Map (db m53219) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Dr. Bartlett Durham
Dr. Bartlett Durham Patriot and Founder of the City of Durham — Map (db m126183) HM
North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Rocky Mount — Around the "Y" Community
This marker dedicated on September 1, 2007 memorializes and honors a predominately African American community. Originally the community was known as around the "Wire" today it is known as the "Y" community. It sprang up in the early 20th . . . — Map (db m94563) HM
North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Rocky Mount — Lincoln Park Historic District
The Lincoln Park Historic District , which is located in the northeast section of Rocky Mount, was constructed from 1948 through 1953 featuring single family housing, one restaurant, and motel. The restaurant and motel was owned by Clarence E. . . . — Map (db m118803) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Alpha Chapel — constructed 1895
"Alpha Chapel — This name has been given the new Chapel midway between Bethania and Rural Hall. The very name "Alpha" is a significant one; inasmuch as this is the first step the Bethania congregation has ever taken in the direction Of . . . — Map (db m140188) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Bethania — Founded 12 June 1759
First planned Moravian Village in N. Carolina. Colonial and antebellum trade and agricultural center. Only remaining continuous, independent Wachovia Settlement. Contains unique remnants of original medieval style plan where families lived in a . . . — Map (db m52627) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Bethania — Established 1759
The Moravian Church is a Protestant denomination tracing its roots to the followers of Jan Hus. A Czech priest and reformer, Hus was martyred for his faith in 1415. The Moravians founded a church body dedicated to a simple and devout life. For . . . — Map (db m140201) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — J-69 — Great Wagon Road
Frontier road from Pennsylvania to Georgia in 18th century. A major avenue for settlers of the N.C. backcountry. Passed near here. — Map (db m52532) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Wolff-Moser House — circa 1799
The Wolff-Moser house was originally located just inside the northern boundary of the Wachovia tract. It is a prime example of an early nineteenth century hand hewn dwelling with brick nogging. The structure is unusually well-crafted, with . . . — Map (db m140186) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Clemmons — Philip and Johanna Hoehns (Hanes) House
The 1796 Flemish-bond brick dwelling is a testament to the wealth, status, and sophistication of prominent farmer and distiller Philip and his wife Johanna Hoehns. Though in a rural area, the house was of similar caliber to many buildings in the . . . — Map (db m102418) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Clemmons — William Johnson
William Johnson Built a fort of huge logs at this place about 1757 to protect his family and neighbors from attack by the Indians Erected by his Descendants 1956 — Map (db m54396) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Clemmons — William Linville — (c. 1711-1766) — Militia Captain and "Long Hunter" —
First frontier explorer and settler of Tanglewood lands along the Great Wagon Road running from PA to GA. Born in Chester and raised in Conestoga, PA. Married Eleanor Bryan and moved to Shenandoah Valley, VA (on Linville Creek) by 1733, serving as . . . — Map (db m54413) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Kernersville — Site of Historic Beeson's Crossroad Trading Post
The trading post was established by Joseph H. Beeson in the 1880's. Joseph converted the old Haley Inn into a trading post that provided essential goods and services to the community that extended from Sedge Garden to Teague Town and from Bunker . . . — Map (db m99758) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — George Mock House
George Mock (1847-1925) built this house in the 1870s and brought his bride, Adeline Shouse, here. The structure of the house had not changed until their son, Marvin Mock (1881-1961), built rooms to the east. — Map (db m53018) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Great Philadelphia Wagon Road — ca. 1754
The Great Wagon Road passed 120 feet north of this marker.The Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia to Augusta was the premier 18th century backcountry road from Pennsylvania to Georgia. From about two miles north of Bethabara it was cut to . . . — Map (db m52921) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Vogler-Reynolds House
Late nineteenth century homestead of James Emmanuel and Elizabeth Irene Standiford Vogler. Residence of Lamb Archibald and Bessie Binkley Reynolds from 1904-1917 and 1924-1961. L. A. Reynolds, a leading nurseryman in Forsyth County, operated his . . . — Map (db m53019) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Apothecary Shop 1763
Constructed for the apothecary (pharmacist), this building was both his home and office. For medicinal purposes, the apothecary dissolved and distilled various herbs and plants--some grown in his garden and others found in nearby fields. . . . — Map (db m53452) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bake Oven 1753 — (reconstructed)
The Brothers, tired of eating unleavened "journey cakes" (johnnycakes), began building an oven to bake bread almost immediately upon arrival. Although once found throughout the thirteen colonies, no original oven currently exists; however, there is . . . — Map (db m53512) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bastion 1756
In the late 1750s Indian hostilities spread through Bethabara and the surrounding area. When the palisade fort was built, these bastions offered good defense by allowing a man to see up and down each side of the fort. Night watch duty was assigned . . . — Map (db m53490) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bell House — (reconstructed)
A bell used in Bethabara to strike the hours and to call the people together for services, or emergencies, such as the Flax House fire in 1776. The first bell--the only one within 200 miles of Bethabara--frightened Cherokee Indians from the fort in . . . — Map (db m53455) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bethabara Fort 1756-63 — (reconstructed)
The French and Indian War (1754-63) prompted the peaceful Moravians, in the midst of busy harvest time and in only 18 days, to build a five-sided palisade around the central part of the community. Later, such fortifications were added to the mill . . . — Map (db m53517) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Bethabara Tavern 1757
Accommodating strangers was difficult until the Brethren built the first tavern in 1757. This tavern served until 1775, when the new tavern was opened on the east side of the extensive community gardens. The old 1757 tavern partially collapsed very . . . — Map (db m53509) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Calf Barn 1765 — (reconstructed)
According to a 1766 map a calf barn was erected on this site in 1765. The map suggests it was made of two equal sized barns, like this one, connected by an open roofed area. The current structure, a late 18th or early 19th-century timber-framed barn . . . — Map (db m54350) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Community Garden 1759 — (reconstructed)
The earliest garden was planted near the Wagner Cabin in 1754. The area was later enlarged by the head garnener, Jacob Lung, to include one half acre and appear as they do today. The members of the community worked in the garden together and then . . . — Map (db m53519) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Congregation Kitchen 1766
In the face of frontier hardships the Moravians practiced common housekeeping. Their system of communal living meant that every member of the congregation had a share in the necessary tasks of sustaining the town, such as raising cabins, clearing . . . — Map (db m53459) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Congregation Store 1759 & 1764
Opened in 1759, the Bethabara store played an important role in the life of the community. It provided basic goods, not only to the Moravians, but also to customers from many miles around. The store served as a shipping point for Moravian goods sent . . . — Map (db m53480) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Congregation Store Addition after 1766
This addition to the Bethabara store was built sometime after 1766, according to surviving maps. Notice the fireplace base support extending to the cellar floor. Additions to Moravian buildings were common, often based more on practicality that . . . — Map (db m53483) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Distiller's House 1803
After a December 2, 1802 fire, which destroyed the original 1756 brewery and distillery, this home was built during the spring and summer of 1803 for the community's distiller, Hermann Buttner, and his wife. Some of the materials were probably . . . — Map (db m53443) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Doctor's Laboratory 1759
This building served as the workshop for the Bethabara doctors. Hans Martin Kalberlahn, the first doctor in Wachovia, died shortly after the building was completed. He was followed by many capable and dedicated physicians. The doctor served not only . . . — Map (db m53451) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Dwelling House/Cow House 1754 — (reconstructed)
Within weeks of their first arrival, the Brothers found the need to build a guesthouse for the "strangers" who came to seek the services of the doctor, lawyer and tradesmen. However, this particular structure was converted into a "house" for cows by . . . — Map (db m53508) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Family House 1758
The Moravians in Bethabara used a "choir" system, which assigned each member of the congregation to a group according to age, sex and marital status. Nevertheless, the importance of the individual family remained a vital part of community life. As . . . — Map (db m53454) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Flour Bin 1758
Added to the bakery, which adjoined the bin on the northeast side, this was a secure storage place for flour supplied by the Moravians' mill (1755). This bakery supplied the town with bread unitl it was replaced by a new bakery in 1782. . . . — Map (db m53495) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Gemeinhaus 1756
This large two-story log building was the first Moravian Congregation House, or church, in North Carolina. It was begun in 1755 and consecrated in February, 1756. It contained the Gemeinsaal (meeting hall) and living quarters for the Minister's . . . — Map (db m53518) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Gemeinhaus 1788
This was the second Gemeinhaus, or Congregation House, built by the Moravians in Bethabara. Today it is the oldest surviving Moravian church in the southeast and the oldest surviving colonial German church with attached living quarters in the United . . . — Map (db m53448) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Hans Wagner Cabin 1752 — (reconstructed)
Hans Wagner, a hunter, trapper and miller, and his teenage son built this cabin in 1752, but left for new land on the Yadkin River, when the Moravians purchased the Wachovia Tract. On November 17, 1753, the first 15 Brothers found the abandoned . . . — Map (db m53515) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Locksmith and Gunsmith Shop 1759
From 1759 to 1786 this building housed a locksmith and gunsmith shop. Customers came from miles around Bethabara, often staying several days in the village, while having work done by the talented Moravian craftsmen. Master Potters Rudolph Christ, . . . — Map (db m53500) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Log House ca. 1816
This log house was built on the site of an earlier 1759 house. Although the date of its construction is still under investigation, according to the Records of the Moravians this house may have been built as early as 1816. Over the years it was . . . — Map (db m53516) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Medical Gardens 1761 — (reconstructed)
The first Medical Garden (Hortus Medicus) was planted here in 1756 for Dr. Hans Martin Kalberlahn. This reconstruction is based upon the Christian Gottlieb Reuter map of Dr. August Schuberts' 1761 garden. The map indicates the plants for each bed. . . . — Map (db m53520) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Memorial Marker 1806
On November 26, 1806, this marker was erected as a memorial to the beginning of the settlement of the Unity of Brethren (Moravians) in Wachovia. It was moved here in 1850, having been placed originally at the site of the first cabin occupied by the . . . — Map (db m53445) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Mill-Wright's House 1762
This small cellar, like many in Bethabara, was beneath a larger house. Stone steps and a place for wooden steps both into the cellar, show access from the inside and outside the house. "Toward the end of May our mill-dam was swept away by . . . — Map (db m53498) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — New Bethabara Tavern 1775
From 1775 until 1787 the new Bethabara Tavern was operated here. Between 1787 and 1801 the building served as the community store while also providing lodging for travelers. The building stood until 1824, apparently continuing to operate as a tavern . . . — Map (db m53506) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — New Tavern Well 1755
Eighteenth century roads were always either dusty or muddy, a traveler would welcome the site of a fresh water well beside a tavern. This well still contains part of its early wooden pump stock. A similar stock was retrieved by the archaeologists in . . . — Map (db m53505) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Pottery Dependency 1756
This building handled the overflow and storage of pottery, and was in use by the potter from 1756 until 1771. When the cellar was being excavated in the 1960s, large fragments of pottery and many Lovefeast mugs were found lying on the . . . — Map (db m53493) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Pottery Shop 1755
Gottfried Aust, the first Moravian potter in North Carolina, moved into this shop after it was built in 1755. He, and several other potters who followed him in Bethabara, produced utilitarian redware pottery including many kinds of vessels, mugs, . . . — Map (db m53491) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Pottery Shop Addition between 1763-1766
Br. Aust, the first potter in Bethabara, moved his business to the new central town of Salem on June 17, 1777. He took down the addition to the Potter's Shop, in order to move the woodwork. Three other significant potters--Christ, Krause, and . . . — Map (db m53492) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Sleeping Hall 1754 — (reconstructed)
By early February 1754, the Brothers decided to build a sleeping hall to help relieve the crowded conditions in the Wagner Cabin. The 13'x50' interpretive reconstruction uses post-and-log construction techniques, with fence rails for the walls. This . . . — Map (db m53511) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Smith's House 1762
New arrivals from Pennsylvania helped to swell Bethabara's population to 75 and 15 outside laborers. As the size of the village grew so did the need for houses and shops. The cellar of this 1762 Smith's House was filled with dirt in the early . . . — Map (db m53499) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Smithy and Christ Pottery 1759
Bethabara's second smithy (blacksmith shop) stood on this site in 1759. In 1755 the first smithy opened for business, and in the active years of building construction in Bethabara, the blacksmith was kept busy supplying necessary hardware and . . . — Map (db m53501) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Store House, Shed and Lodging For Strangers 1754 — (reconstructed)
On February 8, 1754, the Brothers began construction on a "cabin for strangers"; they completed it the following day. It measured 8' by 8', had a fireplace and enough room for two sick guests. In July 1754, another pen, measuring 6' by 8', was added . . . — Map (db m53513) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Summerhouse 1759 — (reconstructed)
This summerhouse was built in 1759 by Christian Triebel, the chief carpenter, later in charge of construction of the first buildings in the new town of Salem. This reconstruction reflects Triebel's carpenter skills and the existence of the Bethabara . . . — Map (db m53502) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Tailor's Shop 1764
One of the Moravians to come to Bethabara in 1753 was a tailor, and his 1756 shop stood near the pottery on the town square. When this new tailor's shop was built in 1764, the first shop became a dining room for the Brothers House. Governor Tryon . . . — Map (db m53496) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Tailor's Shop Addition and Well after 1766
In the floor of the cellar of this addition to the 1764 Tailor's Shop, a depression was found containing the remains of a small wooden box. A drain leading to the box indicates that water collected in the box and that it was probably used to cool . . . — Map (db m53497) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Tavern Well 1763
Fresh drinkable water was important to a colonial community such as Bethabara. In addition to using natural springs in the area, the Moravians dug wells and lined them with stone. Mechanical wooden pumps were more advanced than rope and bucket, and . . . — Map (db m53510) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — The Brothers House 1755
Between November 1754 and June 1755 this large dwelling was built by and for the single men of Bethabara. The cellar you see here was dug beneath one end of the two story log building. This important house served as assembly, dining and sleeping . . . — Map (db m53489) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — The Dyer's and Potter's House 1782
Johannes Schaub, Jr., a dyer, built this house in 1782. It is the oldest brick house in Forsyth County. This house, its additions and out buildings, served from 1789 until 1872 as the home and shop to a succession of Bethabara potters. . . . — Map (db m53446) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Vorsteher's House 1758
This framework and brick home was built in 1758 for the Vorsteher (for-shtay-er), who served his community as business manager and treasurer. His duties would have been similar to those of the present-day city manager's. Due to soil erosion, the . . . — Map (db m53453) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Wachovia Settlement
Wachovia Settlement begun 17 November 1753 — Map (db m53444) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Wash House 1754 — (reconstructed)
This is an interpretive reconstruction of the house used by the Brothers to wash their clothes. The spaces between the logs (the chinks) were not filled with daubing in order to facilitate the movement of fresh air. "This afternoon we had a . . . — Map (db m53514) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Well 1763
This well, one of three dug in 1763, stood on the town square and probably served the needs of many of the central buildings in Bethabara. It had a mechanical pump for bringing up the water, rather than a rope and bucket. This well was still the . . . — Map (db m53456) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Well 1807
This early nineteenth-century well served the Gemeinhaus and its various outbuildings. When the archaeologists reopened the well in the 1960s, an original wooden pump stock was recovered and preserved. "During these days a well has been dug . . . — Map (db m54527) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Rural Hall — 1792 Road Between Bethabara and Germanton
In 1792, a seven-mile public road from Germanton to Bethabara was built by residents who lived along the roadway, its purpose to bypass heavy traffic on the Great Wagon Road, the main multi-state route from northern states. The road connected with . . . — Map (db m104697) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Rural Hall — J-51 — Nazareth Church
Lutheran. Begun about 1778 by German settlers. Formerly called "Old Dutch Meeting House." Present building, 1878. — Map (db m52533) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Union Cross — Daniel Boone Trail
Daniel Boone lived 18 miles S.W. His Parents are buried 25 miles S.W. --.-- Here Passes the Trace of the Old Plank Road, The Fayetteville and Western, Chartered 1848 --.-- This Memorial Erected by the Boone Trail Highway . . . — Map (db m98652) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — "Log House" — ca. 1816
A Federal House later modified in the Greek-Revival style. Research currently being conducted to prepare building as an exhibition of Historical Restorations. — Map (db m51999) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 1753 Great Philadelphia Wagon Road
The most heavily traveled in Colonial America passed near here, linking areas from The Great Lakes to Augusta, GA. Laid out on animal and Native American Trading & Warrior Paths. Indian treaties aming NY, PA, VA and the Iroquois League of Five . . . — Map (db m52540) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-41 — Bethabara
First settlement by Moravians in North Carolina, 1753; known also as Old Town. Church erected 1788. Town is 1 mile N.E. — Map (db m88510) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 6 — Community and Medical Gardens — (Reconstructions) — 1759 and 1761 —
The only known well-documented Colonial Community Garden and the earliest known well-documented Colonial Medical Garden in the United States. — Map (db m53102) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Daniel Boone Trail
In Memory of Trail Maker Hunter and Pioneer DANIEL BOONE Who Hunted Fished and Fought in the Streams and Forests of this and Adjoining Counties During the Middle of the 18th Century --- This Monument is erected by the . . . — Map (db m53726) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Daniel Boone Trail
Daniel Boone lived 18 miles S.W. His Parents are buried 13 miles S.W. --.-- Here Passes the Trace of the Old Plank Road, The Fayetteville and Western, Chartered 1848 --.-- This Memorail Erected by the Boone Trail Highway . . . — Map (db m98651) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 7 — First Village — (Reconstruction) — July 1754 —
The original frontier settlement of the 15 single brothers who arrived from Bethlehem, PA on November 17, 1753 They travelled on the nearby Great Philadelphia Wagon Road. — Map (db m53103) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-63 — Friedberg Church
Moravian. Begun in 1759, organized in 1773; first church and school built in 1769. Third structure, 1825; located 1.6 mi. W. — Map (db m51881) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Gemeinhaus — 1788
The only German Colonial Church with attached living quarters remaining in the United States. Moravian Wachovia tract leader Frederic Marshall designed building. — Map (db m51998) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 2 — Herman Buttner House — 1803
Distiller's house rebuilt from materials of the 1779 House and Distillery, which burned in 1802. Only Distiller's house in Forsyth County. — Map (db m53092) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Historic Bethabara Park 1753 — (Community Garden)
Welcome to the Historic Bethabara Park Community Garden. Restored in 1990, this garden is the only well-documented colonial community garden in America. The original frontier garden of the Moravian settlers was established in 1754 to nourish the . . . — Map (db m54352) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — 3 — Krause-Butner Pottery Shop — 1782
The oldest brick house in Forsyth County. Built by Johannes Schaub, Jr., as a Home and Dyer Shop. Sold to Gottlob Krause for home and pottery in 1789. John Butner purchased Home and Pottery in 1802. — Map (db m53094) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Ogburn Station
In 1800, Edmund Ogburn arrived in North Carolina from Pennsylvania and purchased 51 acres north of Salem from the Moravians. Ogburn and his descendants, who expanded the family property, were among North Carolina's first tobacco farmers. By 1840, . . . — Map (db m100412) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Palisade Fort — 1756-1763 — (Reconstructed) —
The only French and Indian War Fort in the Southeast reconstructed on its original site. This five-sided palisade was built around the central part of the community for protection from Indian aggression. A second fort was located at the Mill Site on . . . — Map (db m52000) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Pfafftown
The farming community of Pfafftown was settled on the west bank of Muddy Creek around the farm of Peter Pfaff Sr., who purchased the land in 1784. In the mid- to late-1800s, several houses in the Greek Revival and other popular styles were built, . . . — Map (db m99753) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-106 — Salem Academy and College
Moravian settlers in 1772 founded a school for girls, now a liberal arts college & academy. Campus is 1/2 mi. N.E. — Map (db m52136) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Salem Waterworks
In 1771, the Moravian Town of Salem completed construction of one of the first public waterworks systems in the American Colonies. Tapping natural springs located nearby, the system used bored logs, joined and buried underground, to deliver the . . . — Map (db m51982) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Site of First House Erected in Winston
Site of first house erected in Winston by Thos. J. Wilson 1847 — Map (db m98779) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Thomas J. Wilson
This site marks the location where Thomas J. Wilson built the first home in what would become the town of Winston. Wilson had received permission from the Moravian Church in 1847 to erect his dwelling north of Salem's central area, as he wanted to . . . — Map (db m98780) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-110 — Wachovia Tract
On Dec. 27, 1752, survey for Moravian settlement began near here. Bishop August Spangenberg led frontier expedition that selected 98,985 acres. — Map (db m51879) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-97 — Washington's Southern Tour
President Washington spent night of May 31, 1791, at the tavern in Salem. 1/2 mile north — Map (db m52135) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — City Jail
This nineteenth century building was used only for the incarceration of an occasional drunk. Logs are joined with square notches, with weatherboard gable ends and a gable roof. — Map (db m44472) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — Federal Bonded Liquor Warehouse
The log building was built by Benaja Black in the 1800's, when the area was known as White Pines. Corn was the main crop at this time. Farmers received permits to make corn whiskey. It was brought to this warehouse, put into barrels, and shipped . . . — Map (db m44468) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — John F Black School House
This simple schoolhouse, built in 1898, is typical of small schools built in the turn of the century. Was built on land belonging to John F. Black and served until 1912 when a larger school replaced it. — Map (db m44464) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — Orignal City Hall — Cherryville, N.C.
First used as city hall in 1892 Built by M.L. Rudisill, Mayor at that time Prior to 1892, the city council met in store buildings or in homes of members. The town paid $15.00 per year rent until the building was donated to town . . . — Map (db m44470) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Cherryville — Smoke House
The log building was built by Benaja Black in 1847, when the area was known as White Pines. The logs are securely joined with pegs. Meat was cured here by subjecting it to dense smoke, and it was stored here during the winter or until used. — Map (db m44474) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — O 50 — Dallas
Named for G.M. Dallas. First seat of Gaston County, 1846~1911;site of Gaston College, now extinct. Courthouse built 1848 is here. — Map (db m18573) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — Eli Hoyle House — C.1832
One of the finest surviving federal style houses in Gaston County. Built as the seat of a 356 acre plantation. Part of the Ancestral Hoyle Family Lands. Listed on the local & National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m44380) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Dallas — First Gaston County Courthouse
On This square was located the Courthouse of Gaston County from 1847 until the County seat was moved to Gastonia in 1911. The first structure, built of logs, was replaced by a brick building in 1848. The interior of this latter building, together . . . — Map (db m18582) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Gastonia — O 18 — North Carolina/South Carolina
North Carolina Colonized, 1585-87, by first English settlers in America; permanently settled c.1650; first to vote readiness for independence, Apr. 12, 1776.

South Carolina Formed in 1712 from part of Carolina, which was chartered . . . — Map (db m129257) HM

North Carolina (Granville County), Oxford — G-56 — Nat’l Rochester — 1752-1831
Officer in Revolution. Member, N.C. Provincial Congress & legislature. Founded Rochester, N.Y., 1811. Home was nearby. — Map (db m841) HM
North Carolina (Greene County), Hookerton — Hookerton Defenses — Confederate Crossing and Headquarters — Potter's Raid —
(preface) On July 18, 1863, Union Gen. Edward E. Potter led infantry and cavalry from New Bern to destroy the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge at Rocky Mount. The infantry feinted toward Kinston and returned to New Bern. Potter raided . . . — Map (db m76890) HM
North Carolina (Greene County), near Snow Hill — F-66 — James Glasgow — ca. 1735-1819
The first Secretary of State of N.C., 1777-98. Glasgow (now Greene) County was named for him. Convicted of land fraud. Lived 2 mi. N.E. — Map (db m66656) HM
North Carolina (Greene County), Snow Hill — Snow Hill
County seat of Greene County, founded 1791. Town established 1811 near Cotechney, the Tuscarora Indian stronghold. Settlers came here about 1710. Incorporated in 1855. Erected by Snow Hill Garden Club • 1957Map (db m130637) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — "The Genesis Monument" — "Genesis" of The City of Greensboro
Approximate Center Of Guilford County as Determined for the Establishment of Greensborough as the County Seat of Guilford County, 1808. In 1807 a petition from the people of southeast Guilford, many of whom were from the German settlements, . . . — Map (db m99824) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — 1757 New Garden Land Purchase
This stone, which now falls within the boundaries of Guilford College, marks the northeast corner of 53 acres purchased for “five sterling” from Richard Williams by Henry Ballinger and Thomas Hunt for the New Garden Friends Meeting and . . . — Map (db m63029) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Christian Isley House
Originally located in eastern Guilford County this one-and-a-half story structure was the home of Christian and Mary Isley. Like other German families, the Isleys migrated to North Carolina from Pennsylvania. In 1788 they purchased approximately 300 . . . — Map (db m54098) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Fisher Park — Greensboro's First City Park — 1901 —
Gift of Captain Basil John Fisher 1851-1903 Native of Aberdeen, Scotland, linguist, world traveler, horseman, British Army officer, served in India, came to the United States with two fellow officers in 1895, settled first in Asheboro, gold . . . — Map (db m99837) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Francis McNairy House
Originally located in northwest Guilford County, this two-story log house was the home of Francis and Mary Boyd McNairy. Like other Scots-Irish families, the McNairys migrated to North Carolina from Pennsylvania. In 1762, they purchased 640 acres of . . . — Map (db m54097) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Hoskins Farmstead
Joseph Hoskins bought his 150-acre farmstead for £200 “Current money of the State of North Carolina” in May 1778. Not much is known about the property and how it was utilized after Hoskins purchased it, but his will indicates some . . . — Map (db m34831) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Tannenbaum Historic Park — Parks and Recreation Department — City of Greensboro —
In 1778 Joseph and Hannah Hoskins moved to Guilford County from Chester County, Pennsylvania, and purchased 150 acres of land here from James Ross. During the Battle of Guilford Courthouse on March 15, 1781, the British army formed its first battle . . . — Map (db m34841) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — J 100 — Model Farm
Established by Quakers 1867 to stem westward migration by promoting improved agricultural practices. Tract, sold in 1891, was ½ mi. E. — Map (db m34042) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Oldest Building in High Point
. . . — Map (db m34928) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Oldest Colonial Trail
Ancient Indian Warrior / Trading Path. A branch passed through Guilford Co. here, ran from the Great Lakes to Georgia. Used by Colonists in Indian Treaty br 1744 but traveled after 1745 at their own risk. Most heavily traveled Early American Road. . . . — Map (db m34925) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — The Haley House
In 1786, John & Phebe Haley built this home on the Petersburg (Va) to Salisbury (NC) Road, a major trade route. At that time, the Haleys owned 368 acres of land around this site. John Haley was a blacksmith by trade, but also served as sheriff, tax . . . — Map (db m34933) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — The Hoggat House
Philip & Mary Hoggat built this house in 1754, 4 miles southwest of here. The Hoggats were among the first Quakers to move to this area. Donated by Mrs. Betty Jo Kellam, the cabin was relocated to this site in 1973 & restored with funds from the . . . — Map (db m34929) HM

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Apr. 8, 2020