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US Civil War Historical Markers

1142 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 942
 
Clarysville General Hospital Marker image, Touch for more information
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2006
Clarysville General Hospital Marker
Maryland (Allegany County), Clarysville — Clarysville General HospitalCenter for Healing
The Clarysville Inn once stood in front of you to the right. In this tavern, and in a complex of buildings constructed around it, the United States established a general hospital during the Civil War. On March 6, 1862, U.S. soldiers commandeered the . . . — Map (db m37540) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cresaptown — Brady's CrossingPartisan Ranger Raid
In the early morning darkness on February 21, 1865, Lt. Jesse McNeill and his 66 Partisan Rangers (Confederate guerrillas) descended Knobly Mountain and stopped briefly at the residence of Felix R. Seymour, a Southern sympathizer. They then forded . . . — Map (db m4680) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Allegany County AcademyCivil War Hospital
During the Civil War, enormous numbers of sick and wounded soldiers overwhelmed both medical science and available hospitals. Approximately fifteen buildings in Cumberland were pressed into service to care for the maimed and ill. Besides warehouses, . . . — Map (db m139091) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Capture of GeneralsCapture of Generals B.F. Kelly and George Crook — Nights, February 21–22, 1865 —
A company of Confederates, young men from Cumberland, Maryland, Hampshire and Hardy Counties, West Virginia, captured several picket posts, obtained the countersign “Bulls Gap,” rode into the city, captured two commanding Union Generals, . . . — Map (db m490) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Capture of Generals B.F. Kelly and George CrookNights, February 21–22, 1865
A company of Confederates, young men from Cumberland, Maryland, Hampshire and Hardy Counties, West Virginia, captured several picket posts, obtained the countersign “Bulls Gap,” rode into the city, captured two commanding Union Generals, . . . — Map (db m81416) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Civil War in Allegany CountyStrategic Location
During the Civil War, thousands of United States soldiers were stationed here in Cumberland and Allegany County to guard against raids and incursions by Confederate forces. Located only about 130 miles from the capital at Washington. . . . — Map (db m1049) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — CumberlandStrategic Center
In 1860, Cumberland was a small town of 7,302 residents, most of whom lived in the valley of Will’s Creek. The town was an important stop on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the western terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. When the Civil . . . — Map (db m14038) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — CumberlandStrategic Center
In 1860, Cumberland was a small town of 7,302 residents, most of whom lived in the valley of Will’s Creek. The town was an important stop on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the western terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. When the Civil . . . — Map (db m17674) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Cumberland SurrendersBetween the Line — Gettysburg Campaign —
In June 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee ordered Gen. John D. Imboden to protect the army's left flank as it marched north through the Shenandoah Valley. Imboden was to draw Union forces into Hampshire County, West Virginia, and destroy bridges . . . — Map (db m139122) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Folck's Mill
Here in Evitts Creek Valley on August 1, 1864, General McCausland's Confederate cavalry, returning after burning Chambersburg, was surprised by General Kelley's Union troops from Cumberland. The Confederates were repulsed and retreated across the . . . — Map (db m17903) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Folck's Mill
Here in Evitts Creek Valley on August 1, 1864, General McCausland's Confederate cavalry, returning after burning Chambersburg, was surprised by General Kelley's Union troops from Cumberland. The Confederates were repulsed and retreated . . . — Map (db m19320) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Folck's MillConfederate Raid
Late in July 1864, Confederate Gen. John C. McCausland led his two cavalry brigades (about 2,800 men) northward into Pennsylvania and Maryland to capture Chambersburg and Cumberland and either collect a ransom or burn the towns. McCausland burned . . . — Map (db m19328) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north . . . — Map (db m1051) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — McNeill’s RaidCapture of Crook and Kelly
In the predawn darkness of February 21, 1865, Confederate Lt. Jesse McNeill and his partisan (guerrilla) rangers rode into Cumberland from the west on this road. Unlike most raiders who targeted the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for attack, McNeill . . . — Map (db m716) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Military Hospital
On this site stood the First Presbyterian Church. During the Civil War it was used as a military hospital — Map (db m19336) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Picket Post No. 1McNeill's Raid to Steal Generals
In the predawn darkness of February 21, 1865, Confederate Lt. Jesse McNeill and his Partisan Rangers approached Cumberland from the west on this road. Unlike most guerrilla raiders, who targeted the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, McNeill had other . . . — Map (db m139089) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Flintstone — McCausland's RaidA Pause to Rest — 1864 Chambersburg Raid —
During the Civil War, retribution by one side for "atrocities" committed against civilian by the other quickly escalated. Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early, during his 1864 Maryland invasion, demanded that several towns pay "ransoms" or be . . . — Map (db m134413) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), North Branch — Pvt James D. Pollock
(front) Pvt James D Pollock Co F 7 Va Cav CSA Aug 27 1841 Jan 27 1916 This grave is designated and protected by the Cumberland Historic Cemetery Organization (rear) This crypt was installed by the . . . — Map (db m138460) HM WM
Maryland (Allegany County), North Branch — Sallie Pollock-Cook-High1847 - 1890
She was a spy for the Confederate army during the Civil War. On April 12, 1864 she was charged with violating the laws of war when letters addressed to Gen. Robert E. Lee and President Jefferson were found on this great Confederate sympathizer. She . . . — Map (db m138459) HM WM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union . . . — Map (db m114568) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Address by President LincolnAt the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that . . . — Map (db m114674) WM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Annapolis During The Civil WarAnnapolis Charter 300 1708-2008 — Commemorating the 1708 Royal Charter under Queen Anne to the City of Annapolis —
General Butler to Governor Hicks Off Annapolis, April 22, 1861 "Have I your excellency's permission...to land my men, to supply their wants, and to relieve them from the extreme and unhealthy confinement of a transport vessel not fit to . . . — Map (db m114563) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Annapolis National Cemetery
Civil War Annapolis In April 1861, Gen. Benjamin Butler and his Massachusetts troops entered the Maryland capital to ensure the state remained in the Union. The U.S. Army then reformed the Department of Annapolis, headed by Butler, to . . . — Map (db m114566) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Butler in Annapolis
The 8th Massachusetts Infantry reached Annapolis April 21, 1861, on the Railroad Ferry Maryland. Col. Benjamin F. Butler forwarded his and the 7th New York Infantry Regiments to Washington. Shortly he was directed to prevent the legislature from . . . — Map (db m6312) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Dahlgren Rifle 30-Pounder, Invented by Rear Admiral Dahlgren
Dahlgren Rifle 30-Pounder, invented by Rear Admiral Dahlgren used by the Federal Navy during the Civil War A forerunner of the big naval gun of today — Map (db m114820) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — From The Bivouac of the DeadBy Theodore O'Hara
The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On Fame's eternal camping-ground Their silent tents are spread, And Glory guards, with solemn round, . . . — Map (db m125122) WM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Henry Hays Lockwood1814-1899
Cadet West Point 1832-6; Lieutenant U.S. Army 1836-7; Professor of Mathematics U.S.N. 1841—99. Brigadier General U.S.V. 1861-5; Naval Academy 1845-61 and 1866-71.

One of the founders of the Naval Academy, his life’s best years were . . . — Map (db m108106) HM

Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — History of Our Maryland Flag
Design The black and gold design on the flag is the coat of arms from the Calvert line. It was granted to George Calvert as a reward for his storming a fortification during a battle. The red and white sides of the cross alternating. Since . . . — Map (db m114857) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander's hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m72089) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Lincoln in Annapolis
"Induced by a dispatch from General Grant, I join you at Fort Monroe as soon as I can come." Lincoln to Secretary Seward, 9:00 am, February 2, 1865 (sent in cipher). February 2, 1865: President Abraham Lincoln arrived at the Annapolis & . . . — Map (db m38081) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Sandy Point FarmWilliam Evans, Soldier and Sailor
William Evans, a slave of Capt. Thomas Mezick, the owner of Sandy Point Farm here, enlisted in the 30th Regiment, United States Colored Troops, in March 1864. The 22-year-old, thereby, gained his freedom. He joined 122 other area slaves who had been . . . — Map (db m72087) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Tecumseh
Figurehead of the U.S.S. Delaware 1817 Bronze Replica Gift of the Class of 1891Map (db m7470) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Davidsonville — Watkins Slave Cemetery
At this site, anonymously buried slaves were found during road construction in 1960. These unclaimed individuals were associated with the Locust Grove plantation founded by 1848. The remains were reburied at Mt. Tabor Church in nearby Chesterfield. . . . — Map (db m114877) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Eastport — The Fort at Horn Point
Near here, at the end of Eastern Avenue, is the site of one of three forts built to defend Annapolis Harbor from British raids during the Revolutionary War. Built in 1776, the fort had major defenses of trenches, earthen ramparts and fifteen . . . — Map (db m5724) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Fort Meade — Major General George G. MeadeFort George G. Meade - United States Army
George Gordon Meade was born on December 31, 1815, during his parents’ temporary residence in Cadiz, Spain. After arriving in the United States, he attended boarding schools in Philadelphia and Baltimore. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy, . . . — Map (db m17010) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Lothian — Benjamin Welch Owens, CSA(1836-1917)
On June 19, 1863, during the War Between the States (1861-65), Private Owens of the 1st Maryland Artillery, Confederate States of America, performed heroically at the Battle of Stephenson's Depot. Owens, born and raised in West River, Anne Arundel . . . — Map (db m22147) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Lothian — Pvt. Benjamin Welch OwensAn Outstanding Example of Courage
This monument, dedicated on June 17, 1999, honors the memory of a local man, Benjamin Welch Owens, who left his nearby West River farm to join Confederate forces during the Civil War. Owens was among the tens of thousands of men from Maryland who . . . — Map (db m22146) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Parole — Camp Parole
Located in this vicinity, one of three camps established during the Civil War to accept paroled Union prisoners of war for Confederate prisoners similarly confined in the south. Over the course of the war, thousands of soldiers were held here until . . . — Map (db m66303) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Pasadena — Freetown
Established in the mid 19th century on land owned by Capt. James Spencer, who served in the Union Army during the Civil War, Freetown illustrates the principles of self-sufficiency and cooperation typical of African American communities. The first . . . — Map (db m13567) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union troops. . . . — Map (db m135083) HM WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Address by President LincolnAt the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m135087) HM WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Allegiance by Force
"...there should be an uprising in Baltimore, I shall be compelled to try to put it down; and that gun is the first I shall fire." Major General John Dix, U.S. Army,1861 At the beginning of the Civil War, President . . . — Map (db m66636) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore & Ohio RailroadThe Mount Clare Shops
You are standing on the site of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad’s Mount Clare Shops, a large industrial complex critical to maintaining every aspect of the railroad’s daily operations. Because of their strategic importance, the shops were among the . . . — Map (db m60965) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland's residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m37537) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland's residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m79687) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailDeath at President Street Station
Baltimore – A house Divided In 1861, as the Civil War began, Baltimore secessionists hoped to stop rail transportation to Washington and isolate the national capital. On April 19, the 6th Massachusetts Regiment arrived here at the . . . — Map (db m2418) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot Trail"Keep back ... or I Shoot"
Baltimore - A House Divided On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the . . . — Map (db m6151) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailFlag Waving at Fawn Street — Baltimore – A House Divided —
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m6208) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailBarricade at Jones Falls Bridge — Baltimore – A House Divided —
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m6209) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailLast Shots at Camden Station — Baltimore – A House Divided —
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the city’s . . . — Map (db m37538) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailCombat on Pratt Street — Baltimore – A House Divided —
(Preface) On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m71978) HM WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Brig. General Lewis A. Armistead
Within this cemetery is buried Brig. General Lewis A. Armistead Born New Bern, N.C. Feb. 16, 1817 Died at Gettysburg, Pa. July 3, 1863 Where men under his command made the farthest northern advance by any Southern troops Captain U.S. Army . . . — Map (db m21366) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Burial Place of Twenty-Nine Confederate Soldiers
Erected by the United States to mark the burial place of twenty-nine Confederate soldiers who died at Fort McHenry, Maryland, while prisoners of war, and whose remains were there buried, but subsequently removed to this section, where the individual . . . — Map (db m7050) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Camp CarrollFrom Plantation to Federal Camp
This land was part of a 2,568-acre tract named Georgia Plantation, that Charles Carroll purchased in 1732. By 1760, his son Charles Carroll, a lawyer, had constructed a Georgian summer home, Mount Clare. the Carroll family lived here until 1852. . . . — Map (db m2537) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Camp CarrollThe War Came by Train
Located approximately one mile west along the B&O Railroad's right-of-way was the site of Baltimore's largest Civil War training camp. Known variously throughout the War as Camp Carroll and Camp Cheesebrough, it was located on property once owned by . . . — Map (db m135970) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Church Home and Hospital“I am a Massachusetts woman”
Church Home and Hospital, formerly Washington Medical college, was where Edgar Allan Poe died on October 7, 1849, and where many doctors were trained who served in the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. On April 19, 1861, Adeline . . . — Map (db m2427) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Civil War Guardhouse
Fort McHenry has had several guardhouses. This one, built in 1835 and enlarged in 1857, is one of the best preserved buildings in the star fort. Soldiers on duty in this room guarded military offenders in the adjacent cells. During the Civil . . . — Map (db m2590) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Civil War Magazine
Larger cannon -- and more cannon -- came to Fort McHenry during the Civil War period. To provide safe storage for the additional gunpowder and ammunition, the Army built this magazine in 1864. From the inside it doesn't look especially strong, . . . — Map (db m66644) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Colonel Charles Marshall1830-1902
Chief of Staff to General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox. Later a political reformer and one of nineteenth-century Baltimore's "Seven Great Lawyers." — Map (db m6460) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Confederate Soldiers and Sailors MonumentReconciling History — Baltimore's Confederate Monuments —
During the Civil War, approximately 60,000 Marylanders fought for the Union and 25,000 fought for the Confederacy. After the war, Confederate sympathizers erected monuments such as this one to recognize Confederate soldiers and sailors and to . . . — Map (db m101761) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Confederate Soldiers Memorial
Erected to the memory of the Confederate Dead by the Loudon Park Confederate Memorial Association. 1870 — Map (db m106853) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Confederate Women of Maryland
To the Confederate Women of Maryland 1861-1865 The Brave at Home In difficulty and danger regardless of self they fed the hungry, clothed the needy, nursed the wounded and comforted the dying. — Map (db m62307) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Confederate Women’s MonumentReconciling History — Baltimore's Confederate Monuments —
Dedicated in 1917, this monument was part of a national movement spearheaded by the United Confederate Veterans to place a monument recognizing the sacrifices of Confederate women in the capitals of thirteen Southern states. It was founded by the . . . — Map (db m101757) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Crimea
To escape the intolerable heat of Baltimore summers, Thomas Dekay Winans built this country house on land which he had purchased in 1855. Winans had recently returned from Russia, where he made a fortune supervising construction of the . . . — Map (db m6404) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Crimea MansionThe Arrest of Ross Winans
On May 11, 1861, Union Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's troops occupied the railroad depot southwest of Baltimore at Relay, where a spur of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's main line turned south to Washington. The seizure of Relay yielded a surprise . . . — Map (db m6403) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Discover Baltimore: The Monumental CityHeritage Walk
The Battle Monument was America's first public war memorial and the first since antiquity to honor the common soldier. Designed by Maximilian Godefroy, its construction began in 1815, shortly after the event it commemorates: in 1814, after the . . . — Map (db m89395) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Druid HillStrategic Union Encampment
Within a year of the April 1861 Baltimore Riots, the first of several U.S. Army camps and fortifications began encircling Druid Hill, and important location high above the city and adjacent to the Northern Central Railroad. The 114th and 150th New . . . — Map (db m7594) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Evolution of Fort McHenry
After the Battle of Baltimore in 1814, Fort McHenry continued as a military post for more than a hundred years. The U.S. Army constructed buildings outside the star fort and modified existing structures to serve the needs of the time. During the . . . — Map (db m10881) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Experimental Carriages
Funds for developing new weapons decreased after the Civil War, forcing the Army to upgrade the cannon they already had. These three 19-inch Rodman gun tubes were probably made during the 1870’s, but their carriages are improved versions . . . — Map (db m2637) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Federal Hill
Since the founding of Baltimore, 1729, this hill has been a popular point for viewing the city’s growth. Here 4,000 people feasted 1780, to celebrate the ratification by Maryland of the Federal Constitution and in honor of the new government gave . . . — Map (db m2555) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Federal HillBuilding the Fort
On the evening of May 13, 1861, U.S. General Benjamin E. Butler’s troops occupied Federal Hill and brought their guns to bear on Baltimore. For the next four years the hill, garrisoned by 10 different regiments, served as a strategic Union strong . . . — Map (db m2560) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Fells Point
A colonial maritime community established 1726 by William Fell, shipbuilder of Lancashire, England. In this area were built more than six hundred ships from the colonial era through the Civil War. Birthplace of the U.S. Frigate . . . — Map (db m2517) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Gloria VictisConfederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument
Gloria Victis-To the Soldiers and Sailors of Maryland in the service of the Confederate States of America. 1861-1865 {The front of the base of the monument}Map (db m62306) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Grand Army of the Republic
In memory of the Grand Army of the Republic by the Daughters of the Union Veterans of the Civil War, 1861-1865. Mother Sperling Tent No. 1, April 23, 1933. [rear of marker] [Engraving of a 13-star flag] Our fathers saved. [text on top . . . — Map (db m66592) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Harry Gilmor Monument
Front panel In memory of Harry Gilmor, Lt. Col. 2nd Maryland Cavalry, Army of Northern Virginia. C.S.A

Back panel Harry Gilmor Born January 24, 1838. Died March 4, 1883. Distinguished in Eighteen Hundred and Seventy Seven as . . . — Map (db m106855) WM

Maryland, Baltimore — Historic Canton
Through the efforts of the Canton Improvement Association this old and densely populated ethnic neighborhood was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The two-story red brick row houses are especially noteworthy for their hand . . . — Map (db m2430) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Lee Jackson MonumentReconciling History — Baltimore's Confederate Monuments —
This monument was a gift from prominent Baltimore banker J. Henry Ferguson, who left funds in his will for the City of Baltimore to create a monument to his childhood heroes, Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson. Ferguson died . . . — Map (db m103158) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Locust Point
Established as a port of entry in 1706, this peninsula was originally known as Whetstone Point. Along this road in 1814, soldiers marched to the defense of Fort McHenry, nearby. Port facilities served as a Federal supply camp in the Civil War. Later . . . — Map (db m2561) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Loudon Park National Cemetery
National Cemetery (center panel) In December 1861, the U.S. Sanitary Commission designated a small area of Loudon Park Cemetery for the burial of Union soldiers who died in Baltimore hospitals. The half-acre lot in the northeast corner . . . — Map (db m135081) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Maryland Naval Monument
(east side) Maryland’s tribute to her loyal sons who served in the United States Navy during the War for the Preservation of the Union. (north side) Port Royal • November 7th, 1861 Monitor & Merrimack • March 9th, 1862 New Orleans . . . — Map (db m135097) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Maryland Sons Monument
(west side) To the Sons of Maryland who perished in preserving to us and posterity the “Government of the People, by the People for the People,” secured by our fathers, through the Union. This memorial is erected by her . . . — Map (db m135094) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Mount Vernon Cultural District
Mount Vernon Cultural District provides an unequaled richness of cultural experience. Since the founding of the Peabody Institute in 1857, Mount Vernon has enjoyed a continuing association with the arts. Nineteenth Century Philanthropist George . . . — Map (db m142378) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Patterson ParkCivil War Camp and Hospital
During the Civil War Patterson Park served as a U.S. Army camp, one of several established as part of the Federal occupation of Baltimore. In 1861 the 10th Maine Infantry Regiment occupied Camp Washburn (named for Maine Gov. Israel Washburn) in the . . . — Map (db m61888) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — President Street StationErected 1842 A.D.
Here on April 19, 1861 at 11 A.M. the Sixth Regiment of Massachusetts Infantry commanded by Colonel Edward F. Jones, detrained on its way to the relief of Washington City. The first nine cars were safely drawn to the Camden Street Station of the . . . — Map (db m60937) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — President Street Station
Completed in 1851, the President Street Station is an icon of railroad architecture, featuring Classical Revival elements and incorporating a barrel vault roof design—the first for a railroad station. Its history is also tied to significant . . . — Map (db m145578) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Robert E. Lee and Thomas. J. “Stonewall” Jackson Monument
The parting of General Lee and Stonewall Jackson on the eve of Chancellorsville. They were great Generals and Christian Soldiers and waged war like gentlemen. — Map (db m130483) WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Roger B. Taney MonumentReconciling History — Baltimore's Confederate Monuments —
In 1836, Roger Brooke Taney became Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and served in this position until his death in 1864. In 1857, he wrote the Dred Scott decision, which stated that African American—enslaved and free--- were property . . . — Map (db m101624) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Struggling For Equality
Slavery, segregation, discrimination, and the struggle for equality have defined the African American experience in Baltimore. At the start of the Civil War, Baltimore had 25,680 free blacks-more than any other U.S. city-and only 2,218 slaves. Over . . . — Map (db m6355) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The First Unitarian Church of Baltimore(Universalist and Unitarian)
In 1817, when Baltimore Town boasted 60,000 inhabitants and Mount Vernon Place was still a forest, a group of leading citizens met in the home of Henry Payson "to form a religious society and build a church for Christians who are Unitarian and . . . — Map (db m7168) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Great Guns of the Fort... The Rodman Cannons
The guns in front of you are the heaviest cannons ever mounted at Fort McHenry. The largest fired exploding projectiles weighing 440 pounds. Mass-produced they represent the "coming of age" of America's iron industry. A special process developed by . . . — Map (db m65651) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — To the Memory of the Unknown Dead
Erected by the Women's Relief Corps Auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic. [small plaque] Department of MO. W.R.C. Monument Committee Ruth A. Graham Florence J. Fink Sallie A. Moore Mary E. Wright Clara A. Alford Mary . . . — Map (db m7048) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Union Soldiers and Sailors Monument
[East face, center:] Erected by the State of Maryland to commemorate the patriotism and heroic courage of her sons who on land and sea fought for the preservation of the Federal Union in the Civil War, 1861 - 1865. SCVTO . . . — Map (db m18296) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — USS ConstellationFlagship of the Anti-Slave Trade
Though the Civil War was a period of great innovation for the navy, with widespread use of steam power and the innovation of ironclads there was still a place in the fleet for sailing ships. Built at the Gosport yard in Portsmouth, Virginia, in . . . — Map (db m6153) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — WelcomeHeritage Walk
Discover Heritage Walk, a 3.2 mile walking trail through four fascinating centuries. Within a compact area, Heritage Walk connects some 20 historic sites and museums, traversing four city districts of remarkable diversity and significance. The . . . — Map (db m115215) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Address by President LincolnAt the Dedication of The Gettysburg National Cemetery — November 19, 1863 —
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, . . . — Map (db m134999) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Baltimore National CemeteryNational Register of Historic Places
This National Cemetery has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior 2016 — Map (db m134998) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland’s residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m71334) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Cockeysville — Gilmor's RaidCapturing Cockeysville — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen .Jubal A. Early’s corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded . . . — Map (db m75286) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Halethorpe — The Relay House
On this site in 1830 a hotel with a waiting room and ticket office was built to serve passengers of the B & O Railroad. Here horses were changed for the final 5-mile trip to Ellicott Mills. Hence the name Relay House. As the B & O Railroad grew the . . . — Map (db m103010) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Kingsville — Ishmael Day’s House
When one of Harry Gilmor’s Confederate Cavalrymen (on July 11, 1864) pulled down his Union Flag, Day shot him and then escaped to the woods. They burned his house and barn. — Map (db m1927) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Lansdowne — Lansdowne Christian ChurchHull Memorial
This church is a monument to one Civil Wary veteran’s love for his comrades. Charles W. Hull and his wife, Mary A. Hull, gave the land and the building as a memorial to the men who fought to preserve the Union. The deed stipulated that a memorial . . . — Map (db m115237) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Long Green — Maj. Gen. Isaac Ridgeway Trimble, C.S.A.
Civil Engineer, graduated West Point 1822. Among engineer officers sent to assist railroad companies, surveyed first route of B&O, 1827. Resigned commission to pursue distinguished railroad career. Enlisted in Confederate Army after Baltimore riots, . . . — Map (db m40864) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Lutherville-Timonium — History of The Greenspring Quarry
Mining operations a the Greenspring Quarry began in the mid 1800s, and the stone was used to build railroad beds for the transportation of supplies during the Civil War. In later years the mined materials were used for construction of the Baltimore . . . — Map (db m131337) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Owings Mills — In Memory of William Maxwell Wood, MD
Surgeon General United States Navy, born in Baltimore, Maryland May 21, 1809 and died at Owings Mills, Maryland March 1, 1880. He served his country well. And in memory of Rosemary Carson, his wife, born in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania November 9, . . . — Map (db m2071) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Owings Mills — Jewish Armed Forces Memorial
Dedicated to all Jewish men and women of Maryland who served in the Armed Forces of the United States of America during War and Peace. — American Revolution Civil War Spanish-American War World War I World War II Korea . . . — Map (db m131335) WM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Phoenix — Glen EllenMaj. Harry Gilmor's Childhood Home — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington —
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen .Jubal A. Early’s corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early . . . — Map (db m75287) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Pikesville — The Old United States Arsenal
Built in 1816 after the close of the War of 1812 as an arsenal. Removed to a point of safety beyond Baltimore. Used during the War between the States and later as a Confederate Home. Now the property of the State of Maryland (1935). — Map (db m2322) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Reisterstown — Colonel William Norris(1820-1896)
Chief of the Confederate States Army Signal Corps and Secret Service Bureau, 1862–1865. Appointed Commissioner of Prisoner Exchange with rank of Colonel in April 1865. The Norris Home, “Bookland,” stood 2½ miles south of this . . . — Map (db m2064) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Relay — Masterpiece of the Early B&O Railroad
Before you stands the thomas Viaduct, named after Philip E. Thomas, the first president of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. This unique bridge has become an enduring symbol of the B&O Railroad and the Patapsco Valley, surviving several floods and . . . — Map (db m8834) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Relay — Relay
Created in 1830 as a change point, or "relay," for horses hauling the first scheduled railroad cars in the U.S. The first rail link to nation's capital began here. Thomas Viaduct carries the track across Patapsco gorge; completed in 1835, it is the . . . — Map (db m8764) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Towson — The Home of Governor Augustus W. Bradford
The home of Governor Augustus W. Bradford, which stood on this site was burned July 11, 1864 by Confederate Troops “to retaliate the burning of Governor Letcher’s Home” in Virginia by Federal troops. This was the closest point to . . . — Map (db m115243) HM
Maryland (Calvert County), Lusby — Cove Point Lighthouse3.4 miles
Built in 1828, the oldest operating lighthouse in Maryland. The prism lens used today was manufactured in Paris and installed in 1897. The original 38-foot tower was built of locally manufactured brick and was raised about 1912 to 51 feet. In 1953 . . . — Map (db m3440) HM
Maryland (Calvert County), Lusby — Morgan Hill Farm
The tract, originally known as Morgan’s Fresh, was granted, 1651, to Philip Morgan, a captain in the Puritan militia. The house, which overlooks St. Leonard Creek, was built before 1670 and served as a lookout station in the War of 1812 and the . . . — Map (db m3437) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m3390) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Maryland's Eastern ShoreHundreds of Enslaved and Free Black Men Enlisted
Although isolated from Maryland's largest population centers, the Eastern Shore was important to the state's role in the Civil War and exemplified the citizens' divided loyalties. In the years before the war, enslaved African-Americans here . . . — Map (db m113505) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Nest of TraitorsThe Denton Arrests
On August 17, 1862, the steamboat Balloon arrived at Denton wharf and disembarked a company of New York infantry and a troop of cavalry. The soldiers quickly arrested twelve prominent local citizens and transported them to imprisonment at . . . — Map (db m68428) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Revolution or Fraud?Emancipation in Caroline Co.
Maryland slaves were not freed by the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, which excluded states that remained in the Union from its provisions. It was Maryland's new constitution, adopted by the narrow margin of 291 votes of almost 60,000 cast on . . . — Map (db m3389) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Federalsburg — A Paradise For SmugglersNanticoke River, 1861-1863
During the Civil War, Maryland's Eastern Shore became a "smuggler's paradise," as coasting vessels from New York made daily runs with contraband goods to the unguarded rivers of Delaware. Cargoes were then carried by wagon to the upper reaches of . . . — Map (db m137738) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Federalsburg — Civil War Memorial
In memory of the soldiers of the Civil War buried in this cemetery — Map (db m137762) WM
Maryland (Caroline County), Greensboro — Letter to LincolnChaos on the Eastern Shore
The war divided communities in Maryland, pitting neighbor against neighbor. During Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North, which ended at Antietam, a Greensboro resident wrote to President Abraham Lincoln for assistance on . . . — Map (db m3398) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Hillsboro — Frederick DouglassTales of Horror
The anti-slavery movement was a major factor in the regional contention that led to the Civil War. During the 1840s and 1850s, no individual generated greater support in both America and Europe for that movement than Frederick Douglass. His eloquent . . . — Map (db m68430) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — The Underground RailroadSeed of War
Among the factors that contributed to the coming of the Civil War was the increasing animosity between Southerners and Northerners over the issue of slavery. The operation of the Underground Railroad to help slaves escape to the free North and . . . — Map (db m5411) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Manchester — Manchester
The Second Cavalry Division and the Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac, camped about Manchester June 30, 1863. Headquarters for Major General John Sedgwick was located on nearby Old Fort School House Road. On the night of July 1, the Corps left . . . — Map (db m2989) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Manchester — ManchesterMeade's Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and to engage the Confederates in battle. Meade was . . . — Map (db m75696) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Middleburg — Army of the PotomacJune 29 1863
Headquarters Army of the Potomac moved from Frederick to Middleburg. First and Eleventh Corps marched from Frederick to Emmitsburg. Second Corps from Monocacy Junction via Liberty and Johnsville to Uniontown. Third Corps from near Woodsborough to . . . — Map (db m29504) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Middleburg — MiddleburgMeade's Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and to engage it in battle. Meade was uncertain of Lee's . . . — Map (db m29498) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Mount Airy — Mount AiryUnder the Barrels — Gettysburg Campaign —
In 1839, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad extended its line through Mount Airy Cut, and a village soon developed here. During the Civil War, Co. K, 14th New Jersey Infantry, guarded the railroad and National Road at Mount Airy. Pine Grove Chapel, . . . — Map (db m12493) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), New Windsor — New WindsorVillage by Moonlight — Gettysburg Campaign —
In June 1863, as Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia marched north, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart’s Confederate cavalry rode east of the main army. Soon, Federal cavalry hunted Stuart. Gen. David McM. Gregg’s division left Frederick about 4 . . . — Map (db m105244) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Sykesville — Hood’s Mill
Near here the Confederate cavalry of Major General J. E. B. Stuart entered Carroll County from Cooksville about daybreak June 29, 1863. After damaging the tracks and bridge of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Sykesville, they marched to . . . — Map (db m133800) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Sykesville — SykesvilleCapturing Joe Hooker — Gettysburg Campaign —
In June 1863, as Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia marched north, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s Confederate cavalry rode east of the main army. Soon, Federal cavalry hunted Stuart. Before dawn on June 29, several former area residents . . . — Map (db m13883) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — 1st Lieutenant John E. Buffington
. . . — Map (db m91239) HM WM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — Army of the PotomacJune 30, 1863
Headquarters Army of the Potomac moved from Middleburg to Taneytown. First Corps marched from Emmitsburg to Marsh Run, Third Corps from Taneytown to Bridgeport, Fifth Corps from Liberty via Johnsville Union Bridge and Union to Union Mills, Sixth . . . — Map (db m3004) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — Army of the PotomacJuly 1, 1863
First Corps marched from Marsh Run, Eleventh Corps from Emmitsburg to Gettysburg, Second Corps from Uniontown via Taneytown to near Gettysburg, Third Corps from Bridgeport via Emmitsburg to the field of Gettysburg, Fifth Corps from Union Mills via . . . — Map (db m3005) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — Bridgeport
As part of General Meade’s screen for Washington as the Confederates invaded Maryland and Pennsylvania, the Third Corps, Army of the Potomac, arrived here June 30, 1863, from Taneytown, next day General Daniel E. Sickles marched this Corps to . . . — Map (db m3000) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — Extra! Extra!"Mount and Spur for Gettysburg"
Whitelaw Reid, a Civil War correspondent, began reporting for The Cincinnati Gazette in 1862. On June 30, 1863, Reid took the train from Washington, D.C, and traveled to General George Gordon Meade’s headquarters just outside of Taneytown on the . . . — Map (db m65131) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — Meade’s Headquarters
Major General George G. Meade, commander of the Army of the Potomac, maintained headquarters on the nearby Shunk Farm from June 30 until the night of July 1, 1863. From here he directed the initial concentration of the Union forces at Gettysburg. — Map (db m2996) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — TaneytownMeade’s Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and to engage the Confederates in battle. Meade . . . — Map (db m3002) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Union Bridge — Union Bridge - Reynolds’ Last Journey
Gettysburg Campaign Union Gen. John E. Reynolds was killed at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863 while directing his command along the Chambersburg Turnpike in the early fighting. His body was carried to a house in town. Orderlies searched for a coffin . . . — Map (db m3017) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Defiance at Union Mills"I'm a Union man!" — Gettysburg Campaign —
In 1863, brothers Andrew K. and William Shriver resided on either side of the Littlestown Turnpike here and likewise were divided in their loyalties, with William supporting the Confederacy and Andrew the Union. When officers at the head of Gen. J. . . . — Map (db m2992) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion and Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m2994) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Union Mills"Shining lights" — Gettysburg Campaign —
At daybreak on June 30, 1863, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart arrived here from his bivouac at the Orendorff farm north of Westminster. He then gathered his brigade commanders to discuss Union Gen. Judson H. Kilpatrick’s cavalry division, which was encamped . . . — Map (db m2995) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Uniontown — Army of the PotomacJune 29 1863
Headquarters Army of the Potomac moved from Frederick to Middleburg. First and Eleventh Corps marched from Frederick to Emmitsburg. Second Corps from Monocacy Junction via Liberty and Johnsville to Uniontown. Third Corps from near Woodsborough to . . . — Map (db m50088) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Uniontown — Headquarters Second Corps Army of the Potomac
On and about the nearby Babylon Farm Major General Winfield Scott Hancock rested his corps June 29, 1863. On July 1, the corps marched through Taneytown to take part in the Battle of Gettysburg. — Map (db m3013) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Uniontown — Uniontown“Patriotic, but Paralyzed” — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 27, 1863, Union Gen. Winfield S. Hancock’s II Corps, Army of the Potomac camped at Monocacy Junction near Frederick. The next day, Gen. George G. Meade assumed command of the army and devised a plan to march it through Frederick and Carroll . . . — Map (db m3014) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — A Final TributeBattle of Westminster — Corbit's Charge, June 29, 1863 —
The City of Westminster and the citizens of Carroll County proudly honor the brave men of the 1st Delaware Cavalry and the vanguard of Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's cavalry who fought and died during this engagement in the Gettysburg Campaign. We comment the . . . — Map (db m103828) WM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Aftermath of BattleHospitals and Graves — Gettysburg Campaign —
After the cavalry engagement here on June 29, 1863, Westminster’s citizens cared for dozens of wounded of both sides. Besides the human toll, shattered and broken cannons, gun carriages, and caissons lined both sides of Court Street to Main Street . . . — Map (db m13848) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Army of the PotomacJuly 3, 1863
First and Second Brigades First Cavalry Division marched from Taneytown to Westminster, the Reserve Brigade of First Cavalry Division from Emmitsburg to the field of Gettysburg, and the Second Brigade Second Cavalry Division from Manchester to . . . — Map (db m13854) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Army of the PotomacJune 29, 1863
Headquarters Army of the Potomac moved from Frederick to Middleburg, First and Eleventh Corps marched from Frederick to Emmitsburg, Second Corps from Monocacy Junction via Liberty and Johnsville to Uniontown, Third Corps from near Woodsborough to . . . — Map (db m13856) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Corbit’s Charge
Here June 29, 1863, Captain Charles Corbit led Companies C and D, First Delaware Cavalry, against General J. E. B. Stuart’s cavalry division. Though repelled by overwhelming force, the attack delayed Stuart, and was a factor in his failure to reach . . . — Map (db m3024) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Corbit's Charge“Suicidal Bravery” — Gettysburg Campaign —
In June, 1863, as Gen. Robert E. Lee’s infantry marched through Maryland on its second invasion of the North, Lee lost contact with Gen. J.E.B. Stuart as the cavalry commander led his force east and north around the Union army. Here, on the . . . — Map (db m13832) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Divided LoyaltiesA U.S. Flag Goes South
During the Civil War, some Westminster families supported the Confederacy while others stood by the Union. Among the latter was Mary Ann “Mollie” Huber, who organized a dozen other like minded ladies into a sewing circle that met at her . . . — Map (db m13849) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Divided LoyaltiesThe Neal Family — Gettysburg Campaign —
A block away, at what is now 71 East Main Street, stood the Abner Neal house. In August 1862, Federal soldiers arrested sixteen Westminster residents as Southern sympathizers and escorted them to Baltimore for questioning. The group, soon released, . . . — Map (db m114404) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Engagement at WestminsterWar at the Almshouse — Gettysburg Campaign —
On June 29, 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s infantry was in Pennsylvania, and Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry arrived here on the outskirts of Westminster. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s division led the column, which numbered 6,000 including cavalrymen . . . — Map (db m13826) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m75738) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat — Maryland Civil War Trails —
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m114403) HM WM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — History Is Also Now
Presented to the citizens of Westminster by the Mayor and Common Council History Is Also Now Designed by Lewis Schlitt ©1999 and created with help of Drury Bynum, Thomas Van Damme, and James Veenstra. Based on . . . — Map (db m114431) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Neal Home
Site of Abner Neal home. His sons, Henry and Frank, were arrested on Aug.28, 1862 as Southern supporters. Released, they joined the Army of Virginia and returned with Stuart's advance guard on June 29, 1863, en route to Gettysburg. Here, Brig. Gen. . . . — Map (db m103746) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — The Opera House
Built in 1854 as an Odd Fellows Hall and served as an "Opera House" and community center for nearly a century. Reported to have been used by Union troops during the Civil War. Opera House printing company located here in 1976 by its owner, . . . — Map (db m103704) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — The Rosser Raid"Welcome into my home!" — Antietam Campaign 1862 —
After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's smashing victory over Union Gen. John Pope at the Second Battle of Manassas, Lee decided to invade Maryland to reap the fall harvest, gain Confederate recruits, earn foreign recognition of the . . . — Map (db m114405) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — The Trumbo-Chrest House
The Trumbo-Chrest House has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m114397) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Union MillsBuilt 1797 on the site of an earlier mill by Andrew and David Shriver Jr.
On June 29, 1863 General J. E. B. Stuart and his cavalry camped here. On June 30, 1863 General James Barnes of the 5th Corps U. S. Army spent the night on his way to Gettysburg. — Map (db m2991) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Westminster
County seat of Carroll County, founded 1764 first called Winchester for its founder William Winchester (1710-1790), who was born in Westminster, England (now a part of Greater London) Westminster Academy incorporated 1839 (later absorbed into the . . . — Map (db m75698) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Westminster DepotPressed into Service — Gettysburg Campaign —
During the Civil War, railroads for the first time attained strategic importance for transporting troops and equipment. On July 1, 1863, Gen. Herman Haupt, chief of U.S. Military Railroads, assumed control here of the Western Maryland Railroad to . . . — Map (db m13828) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Creswell Hall
The home of John A. J. Creswell who nominated James Buchanan for President in 1856 and turned Republican in 1861. He was successively Assistant-Adjutant General of Maryland, member of the House of Representatives, Senator and Postmaster by . . . — Map (db m145436) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Elkton — Wilna
Boyhood home of William Whann Mackall. Appointed to the U. S. Military Academy in 1834. Resigned from the U. S. Army, joined the Confederacy and served on the staffs of Generals Albert Sydney Johnston, Braxton Bragg and Joseph E. Johnston. General . . . — Map (db m145439) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — PerryvilleOne Week After the War Began
On April 18-19, 1861, a week after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, South Carolina, Confederate sympathizers attacked U.S. Army forces en route to Washington in Baltimore, 35 miles southwest of here. On the second day shots were fired and soldiers . . . — Map (db m145865) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — The Perryville Mule SchoolObstinate Recruits
(Main Text) Soon after the Civil War erupted in April 1861, Perryville became an important Union staging area. Adjacent to Fort Dare here, a riverside plantation was confiscated from Confederate sympathizers and immediately transformed . . . — Map (db m145891) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Port Deposit — Gerry House
Built 1813, probably by Daniel Megredy. Lafayette was entertained here in 1824. Later owned by Cornelius Smith (1792–1858), farmer and philanthropist who financed road construction to create jobs for the unemployed and aided public education . . . — Map (db m127920) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Port Deposit — John A. J. Creswell
Born at this house at Creswell’s Ferry, now Port Deposit, in 1828, John Creswell graduated from Dickinson College and became a lawyer. He was elected to the General Assembly in 1861, became Adjutant General in 1862, was elected to Congress that same . . . — Map (db m145442) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Port Deposit — Snow’s Battery
On August 30, 1861 Battery B of the Union Army under the command of Capt. Alonzo Snow was organized at Port Deposit, composed mainly of men from this town and vicinity. The Battery rendered important service to the Federal forces in the Civil War, . . . — Map (db m145871) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Port Deposit — Snow's BatteryBattery B, 1st Maryland Light Artillery
In the summer of 1861, in prosperous Port Deposit, men volunteered for an artillery battery to fight for their beloved Union. Capt. Alonzo Snow led the approximately 155-man unit. Organized in September, Snow's Battery left the Eastern Shore in May . . . — Map (db m145880) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Rising Sun — Richards Oak
General Lafayette and his army camped around this tree April 12, 1781. A Civil War cavalry unit later occupied the site. The oak, over 500 years old, was owned by the Thomas Richards family for over a century. A huge limb fell August, 1964, . . . — Map (db m145616) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — John Wilkes Booth
John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice Harold hid in a thick woods on Samuel Cox's farm. (One mile north →) for several days before escaping to Virginia after Lincoln's assassination April 14, 1865. — Map (db m129023) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — John Wilkes Booth and David Herold
John Wilkes Booth and David Herold remained hidden from April 16 to 21, 1865 in a nearby pine thicket, while Union troops searched for them. Thomas A. Jones brought them food and the newspapers. — Map (db m39524) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Pine Thicket“the instrument of his punishment” — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. After leaving the home of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd near . . . — Map (db m39528) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich Hill
Mid-18th century farm house (with alterations after 1800) was home of Col. Samuel Cox. This southern sympathizer fed and sheltered fugitives John Wilkes Booth and David E. Herold before dawn on Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865 following Booth's . . . — Map (db m4458) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich HillThe Fugitives Seek Shelter — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
After leaving Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's house on April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his accomplice David E. Herold avoided Zekiah Swamp and made a wide arc around the village of Bryantown. Unsure of their . . . — Map (db m129036) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich Hill Historic SiteHistoric Preservation/Public Archaeology
(Right Banner) After leaving Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's house on April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his accomplice David E. Herold avoided Zekiah Swamp and made a wide arc around the village of Bryanstown. . . . — Map (db m129045) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich Hill Through the Years
) 1666 Hugh Thomas receives a 600 acre patent to "Rich Hill." ) 1666—1714 Beginnings ) 1714—1807 Brown Family Era ) (Image of Dr. Gustavus Brown) ) Scottish immigrant Dr. Gustavus Brown builds the house. 1729 . . . — Map (db m129049) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Benedict — Camp Stanton
Camp Stanton was established in this area, October, 1863, for the recruiting and training of the Seventh, Ninth, Nineteenth and Thirtieth United States Colored Infantry. — Map (db m4112) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Benedict — Camp StantonTraining Post for USCT
Nearby stood Camp Stanton, a Civil War-era recruiting and training post for African American Union soldiers. Named for Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, the camp was established in August 1863. Although black soldiers had served in the nation’s armed . . . — Map (db m15699) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — St. Mary’s Church and CemeteryMudd Meets Booth — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin —
On November 13, 1864, here at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd was introduced to John Wilkes Booth, the future assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Booth had come to Charles County to contact the Confederate underground here and . . . — Map (db m924) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — Village of BryantownCommercial Center — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin —
This building in the Bryantown Tavern, constructed about 1815. On April 15, 1865, the morning after President Lincoln’s assassination, Lt. David D. Dana made it his headquarters while pursuing John Wilkes Booth, the assassin, with a detachment of . . . — Map (db m4500) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Indian Head — Budds Ferry← One mile
Site of a Union Battery, November, 1861 to March 1862. The movements of Confederate troops across the Potomac River in Virginia were observed from a balloon above this point. — Map (db m19569) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Indian Head — General Joseph Hooker U.S.A.
Maintained headquarters here at Chicamuxen Methodist Church from October, 1861, to March, 1862, when over 12,000 Union troops were camped along the Potomac River in Charles County. — Map (db m14774) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Marbury — Rum Point1½ miles →
A landing on Mattawoman Creek used from December, 1861 to March, 1862 to unload supplies for a brigade of New Jersey troops encamped nearby. — Map (db m6082) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Nanjemoy — "Efton Hills"
Birthplace of Admiral Raphael Semmes C.S.N. Appointed a midshipman U.S.N., 1826. He served in the Mexican War with distinction. Joining the Confederate Navy, 1861. He commanded the noted Confederate raider the "Alabama." — Map (db m129255) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Nanjemoy — General Daniel E. Sickles, U.S.A.
Commander of the “Excelsior Brigade”, New York Volunteers, maintained headquarters here October 1861 to March 1862. — Map (db m6230) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — "Huckleberry"
Home of Confederate Mail Agent, Thomas A. Jones, who helped to shelter, and aided the escape of John Wilkes Booth and David Herold in their flight, April 16th to 21st 1865. — Map (db m129119) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — “Cliffton”
On this location Maj. R. G. Watson and his daughter Mary, both Confederate agents, lived and carried on a direct mail and slave route between the North and the South during the entire Civil War. Because of the unobstructed view from these cliffs, . . . — Map (db m5938) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Cliffton
The home of Major Roderick G. Watson is two miles north of this marker. At the start of the Civil War many persons crossed the Potomac River to Virginia in this area. From 1862 to the end of the war, Thomas A. Jones served as a Confederate agent . . . — Map (db m3827) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Crossing the PotomacOff into the Darkness — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. Concealed for several days in a pine thicket two . . . — Map (db m128807) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Dents MeadowOne mile →
John Wilkes Booth and David Herold set out from here for the Virginia shore during the night of April 21, 1865, in a boat supplied by Thomas A. Jones. — Map (db m128809) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m24540) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — "Brentland"2.6 miles →
Birthplace of Acting Brigadier General Joseph Lancaster Brent, C.S.A. (1826-1909). He served in the Trans-Mississippi Department during the Civil War and took part in the siege of Vicksburg. — Map (db m7216) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay —
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m1104) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — Port Tobacco
In this center of Confederate activity, at the Brawner Hotel, Detective Captain William Williams unsuccessfully offered Thomas Jones $100,000 reward for information that would lead to the capture of John Wilkes Booth. — Map (db m128825) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — Port Tobacco: A Maryland Mosaic
On this ground, two cultures — Indian and European — confronted one another. Here a commercial town and government center grew, declined, grew again, and declined again. Residents raised supplies for the Continental Army and, . . . — Map (db m142892) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — Port Tobacco: Conspiracy & the Plot to Assassinate President Lincoln
Port Tobacco was the home and place of business of George Atzerodt. Although he failed to murder Vice President Andrew Johnson, he was convicted and executed for his role in the plot to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln. Part of . . . — Map (db m128954) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — Rose Hill
Home of Miss Olivia Floyd, Confederate agent, and her brother Robert Semmes Floyd, C.S.A. killed in action. Both are buried in St. Ignatius Church Yard two miles south. — Map (db m39523) HM

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Apr. 8, 2020