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Churches & Religion Historical Markers

253 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 53
 
Glencoe - Churches Marker image, Touch for more information
By Patrick G. Jordan, June 27, 2010
Glencoe - Churches Marker
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Churches — Glencoe
Church congregations were central to social as well as religious life in the village. Mill owners encouraged church membership among their workers and often aided congregations to promote social stability and community morality. The Baptist church, . . . — Map (db m32376) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — St. Paul's Lutheran Church
On Colonial Trading Path Travelers used nearby spring Preaching point 1759 Originally called "Graves Church" Church founded circa 1770 Burials from early period in rock enclosed cemetery Recorded burials from 1790 Called "the Chappel" . . . — Map (db m32156) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Burlington — Union Ridge Church — 1815
Since before 1776 religious services have been held on this site. In 1815 several residents here bought property, organized a church and began holding regular services open to all. The new church soon joined with the Christian denomination of the . . . — Map (db m89309) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Elon — G 52 — Elon University
Founded Elon College by the Christian Church in 1889. Coeducational. Burned in 1923; rebuilt 1923 - 26. — Map (db m30100) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Graham — 1763 Providence — Center of History
This site and "meeting house" was the area birthplace of a new country in pre-revolutionary meetings, a new county (Alamance), a new county seat (Graham), an early public library, a courthouse, a school to college presidents and a governor, and a . . . — Map (db m64237) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Graham — Mt. Hermon Meeting House
Of log construction, used for worship and school, stood here. Deed for land recorded in 1834 states it adjoins old Mt. Hermon tract, which signifies a place of worship existed prior to this date. Feb. 27, 1834 annual Methodist Protestant Conference . . . — Map (db m66554) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Graham — Providence Church & Cemetery — First building erected c. 1763
Side A Providence was a gathering spot for pioneers in the Haw River basin. Many families and denominations during the eighteenth century used this cemetery. Many early settlers including members of the Turrentine, Sellars, Holt, Harden, . . . — Map (db m28277) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Mebane — G 30 — Hawfields Church
Presbyterian, founded about 1755, three miles N.E. Henry Patillo the first pastor. Present building erected 1852. — Map (db m29337) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Saxapahaw — Saxapahaw
. . . — Map (db m30264) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — A Memorial to British Troops Who Died in the Old Meeting House
A memorial to British troops who died in the Old Meeting House during Cornwallis encampment here on his retreat from Guilford Courthouse March 1781. Erected by Troop 46 B.S.A. Henry Overman Leader Who Died Before Completing It. — Map (db m30558) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — Cane Creek Friends Meeting Since 1751 / Abigail Overman Pike 1709 - 1781
Side 1: Cane Creek Friends Meeting Since 1751 The first Cane Creek Meetinghouse stood about two miles east on land belonging to John Stanfield. The first of four meetinghouses on this site was built in 1764 on land given by William . . . — Map (db m30682) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — G 69 — Cane Creek Meeting
First Monthly Meeting of Friends in central North Carolina, 1751. Present building is on the original site. — Map (db m30487) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — G 76 — Snow Camp
Settled by Quakers in 1749. Cornwallis camped in area after Battle of Guilford Courthouse and used home of Simon Dixon as headquarters. — Map (db m32292) HM
North Carolina (Alamance County), Snow Camp — G 91 — Spring Friends Meeting
Meeting house by 1761; Meeting recognized, 1773; Preparative Meeting, 1779; & Monthly Meeting, 1793. — Map (db m30276) HM
North Carolina (Anson County), Ansonville — K 57 — Ralf Freeman
Free black served as a Baptist pastor at Rocky River Church until law in 1831 barred blacks from public preaching. Buried 500 yards west. — Map (db m77358) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — B-48 — Alexander Stewart
Anglican minister to N.C., 1753-71. Served parish of St. Thomas & as chaplain to Gov. Arthur Dobbs. Erected first glebe house on record in the colony. — Map (db m65664) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — Bath African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church
This site marks the former location of the Bath African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. The AME Zion denomination, chartered in New York City in 1801, began in the 1790s when discrimination against African American Christians forced them to . . . — Map (db m65673) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — Colonial Bath
Bath, originally the Indian town of Pampticough, was settled by white men about 1690 and incorporated in 1705. It is the oldest town in North Carolina. Its first commissioners were John Lawson, Joel Martin, and Simon Alderson. Here was . . . — Map (db m64799) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — B-63 — John Garzia — ca. 1690-1744
Anglican minister, born in Spain. Served parish, 1733-1744, in spite of difficulties inherent to life in colonial N.C. — Map (db m67170) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Bath — B-3 — St. Thomas Church
Episcopal. Oldest church building in the state of North Carolina; was constructed in 1734. — Map (db m67568) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Chocowinity — B-46 — Trinity Church
Episcopal. Originally Blount’s Chapel. Built ca. 1774 by Rev. Nathaniel Blount. Moved in 1939 from original site nearby. — Map (db m52776) HM
North Carolina (Beaufort County), Washington — B-59 — St. John the Evangelist Church
The first Roman Catholic church in North Carolina. Consecrated, 1829. Burned by Federal troops, 1864. Stood one block east. — Map (db m67562) HM
North Carolina (Bladen County), Clarkton — Old Brown Marsh Presbyterian Church — 2 Miles North East
Organized prior to 1756. Present building constructed 1818—the third on site. First two buildings of logs. Was also used for secular education until 1848. Among early ministers: H. McAden, Jas. Hall, S. Stanford, C. Lindsay. — Map (db m60483) HM
North Carolina (Bladen County), Clarkton — Old Brown Marsh Presbyterian Church
Organized prior to 1756 by Scottish settlers. Present building constructed 1818. Third building on site. First two building of logs. Was also used for secular education until 1848. Some early ministers: H. McAden — Jas. Hall — S. . . . — Map (db m60485) HM
North Carolina (Bladen County), Elizabethtown — Mount Horeb Presbyterian Church and Cemetery
Mount Horeb Presbyterian Church and Cemetery circa 1845 have been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m94725) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Shallotte — Shallotte
Established late 1700’s. Incorporated March6, 1899. The Shallotte River was navigated by commercial sailing vessels until the 1920’s when the roads were built. First church building erected on this site circa 1799. — Map (db m28823) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Southport — Railroad & Religion on Rhett Street
Between the Civil War and the construction of the Panama Canal in 1904, local residents and investors desperately sought to surpass Wilmington by building a rail link to the Appalachian coal fields. Smithville would become the first refueling stop . . . — Map (db m6227) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Winnabow — Brunswick Town State Historic Site
Brunswick Town State Historic Site was established on land donated to the State of North Carolina in December, 1952, by James Laurence Sprunt and his four sons, James Laurence Sprunt, Jr., Kenneth Murchison Sprunt, Samuel Nash Sprunt, and Laurence . . . — Map (db m5535) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Winnabow — D-73 — John LaPierre
Ordained 1707; came to America 1708. Served in many churches in area as missionary of Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, 1732–1755. — Map (db m6483) HM
North Carolina (Brunswick County), Winnabow — D-55 — St. Philips Church
Anglican, built under act of 1751. Graves of Governors Arthur Dobbs and Benjamin Smith and U.S. Justice Alfred Moore. Ruins 2 mi. S.E. — Map (db m6467) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — "The Block"
Eagle Street traditionally has been the commercial, cultural, and professional center of the African-American community. The YMI Cultural Center, commissioned by George W. Vanderbilt in 1892 as the Young Men's Institute, was renovated in the 1980s. . . . — Map (db m98367) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — P-33 — Francis Asbury
Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1784-1816, often visited and preached at the home of Daniel Killian which was one mile east. — Map (db m31456) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Asheville — Trinity Episcopal Church — Built 1911 - 1913
Designed by Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue of Cram, Goodhue and Ferguson, New York Has been placed on the National Register Of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m32324) HM
North Carolina (Buncombe County), Swannanoa — P-69 — Warren Wilson College
Founded in 1894 by the Presbyterian Church as Asheville Farm School. A four-year college since 1966. 1½ mi. E. — Map (db m57301) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — The Waldensian Colony
To the Waldensian Colony from the Cottian Alps. who settled here first in 1893 numbering in all 427, in recognition of their Christian ideals, integrity, industry and good citizenship this monument is erected, by the Town of Valdese. And . . . — Map (db m20336) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — Valdese Centennial Park — Legend of Plaques
First Marker:Centennial Seal Official Seal of the 100th Celebration of the founding of Valdese Future From an agrarian beginning through Industrial growth, comes a bright horizon Civic Citizens Band together . . . — Map (db m20396) HM
North Carolina (Burke County), Valdese — N 2 — Waldenses
A religious body dating from the middle ages. The town of Valdese was founded by members of this group in 1893. — Map (db m20335) HM
North Carolina (Cabarrus County), Concord — Adolph Nussmann Monument
side 1 Adolph Nussmann 1739-1794 Pioneer minister and founder of the Lutheran Church in North Carolina side 2 Born in German; educated in the University of Gottingen; called through commissioners Christopher . . . — Map (db m77377) HM
North Carolina (Cabarrus County), Concord — L-102 — Barber-Scotia College
Presbyterian. Est. 1867 by Luke Dorland to educate Negro women, Scotia Seminary merged in 1930 with Barber Memorial Institute. Coed since 1954. — Map (db m43383) HM
North Carolina (Cabarrus County), Concord — L 72 — St. John's Church
Lutheran. Began ca.1745 as Dutch Buffalo Creek Church. Adolph Nussman was first regular pastor, 1773. Building erected 1845. 300 yards north. — Map (db m77369) HM
North Carolina (Cabarrus County), Concord — St. John's Lutheran Church — Community Sacrifice
During the Civil War, about two hundred members of St. John’s Lutheran Church served in at least eight Confederate army units. The units included companies in the 8th, 20th, 33rd, 52nd, and 57th North Carolina Infantry regiments, as well as a . . . — Map (db m77374) HM
North Carolina (Caldwell County), Lenoir — N 30 — Davenport College
For women; chartered 1859 by Methodist Episcopal Church, South; merged with Greensboro College, 1933. Two bldgs. stand 100 ft. S.W. — Map (db m77566) HM
North Carolina (Caldwell County), Lenoir — Raiders in Lenoir — St. James Episcopal Church and Prison — Stoneman's Raid —
(preface) On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee . . . — Map (db m77565) HM
North Carolina (Camden County), South Mills — A 63 — McBride Church
Methodist since 1792. Begun as Anglican c. 1733. Visited by bishops Francis Asbury and Thomas Coke. Building erected 1837; remodeled 1882. 2½ mi. E. — Map (db m56764) HM
North Carolina (Carteret County), Beaufort — C 83 — Jacob Henry — ca. 1775-1847
First Jewish member of N.C. legislature, 1808. Delivered a landmark address on religious freedom. Lived here. — Map (db m77035) HM
North Carolina (Caswell County), Hightowers — G-77 — Griers Presbyterian Church
Organized in 1753. Rev. Hugh McAden served as its first minister. Present building dates from 1856. Stands 1 mi. E. — Map (db m19350) HM
North Carolina (Caswell County), Locust Hill — G-67 — Bethesda Church
Presbyterian. Began as "Hart's Chapel," about 1765. Mother of many churches. The present building erected 1944, stands 3/4 mile south. — Map (db m18675) HM
North Carolina (Caswell County), Semora — G-25 — Red House Church
Presbyterian. Founded about middle of 18th century. Hugh McAden, its noted pastor, was buried in the churchyard, 1781. One mile S. — Map (db m19354) HM
North Carolina (Catawba County), Hickory — Frame Church
To your right stood a frame church built by First Presbyterian Church. The first service was Nov. 2, 1878, and was their house of worship until 1905, when it was purchased by Christ Lutheran Church. The Lutherans worshiped here until 1926. It was . . . — Map (db m18567) HM
North Carolina (Chatham County), Durham — H-78 — O'Kelly Chapel Christian Church
Organized, 1794, by Jas. O'Kelly, founder of the denomination. Present building fourth on site. — Map (db m71359) HM
North Carolina (Chatham County), Siler City — H 84 — Rocky River Friends Meeting
Established under care of Cane Creek Meeting, 1753; a Monthly Meeting since 1908. Fourth building was constructed in 1926. — Map (db m30965) HM
North Carolina (Cherokee County), Murphy — Trail of Tears — The Valley Towns Baptist Mission
In 1838, the United States government deported more than 16,000 Cherokee Indian people from their homeland in Tennessee, Alabama, North Carolina, and Georgia, and sent them to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Thousands of Cherokee perished during . . . — Map (db m120337) HM
North Carolina (Chowan County), Edenton — Edenton United Methodist Church
On this site, from 1895 to 1983, stood the new Methodist Church of Edenton. It was a brick structure, a model of elegance and arrangement. The building replaced a wooden church that was located on Eden Street from 1857 to 1895. Prior to that . . . — Map (db m57076) HM
North Carolina (Chowan County), Edenton — A 1 — St Paul's Episcopal Church
Parish formed in 1701, present structure begun in 1736, succeeding two earlier wooden buildings. — Map (db m34776) HM
North Carolina (Clay County), Hayesville — Q37 — George W. Truett
Pastor First Baptist Church, Dallas, Texas, 1897-1944, president of Baptist World Alliance. His birthplace stands one mile northwest. — Map (db m41938) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Polkville — O-75 — Mount Harmony United Methodist Church
Congregation organized by 1791. Cemetery and present building, the church's forth, are one mile west. — Map (db m23544) HM
North Carolina (Cleveland County), Shelby — O-72 — Thomas Dixon, Jr. — 1864-1946
Minister, politician, & author. Film "Birth of a Nation" was based on his novel The Clansman. Grave is 1500 ft. N. — Map (db m23531) HM
North Carolina (Columbus County), Tabor City — Mt. Tabor
Baptist Church est. here in 1840. Community settled in 1850’s. Railroad terminus located, 1886. Incorporated 1805. Charter changed to Tabor City, 1935. Former “Yam Capital” of the World. — Map (db m862) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — Centenary United Methodist Church
Established in 1772 during a visit to New Bern by Rev. Joseph Pilmoor. First known as Andrews Chapel and located Southwest of this site at Hancock St. and Church Alley. Centenary is the oldest continuing Methodist Church South and East of Baltimore. . . . — Map (db m23743) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — C 42 — Christ Church
Episcopal. Craven Parish created 1715. First church erected 1750, this one in 1875. Communion service, given by George II, 1752, still in use. One block S. — Map (db m76988) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — First House of Worship of Colonial Craven Parish
The walls on this site are erected over the brick and ballast stone foundation of the first house of worship of Colonial Craven Parish which was established in 1715. The brick Anglican Church was completed in 1750, and it continued in use until the . . . — Map (db m24354) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — First Presbyterian Church
Organized in 1817, plaques on the interior walls recognize the thirteen founding members. Built in 1819 - 1821. It is the oldest Presbyterian Sanctuary in continuous use in North Carolina. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and . . . — Map (db m23688) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — 228 — First Presbyterian Church — American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site
Formally organized on January 6, 1817 in the home of Mrs. Elizabeth Minor, First Presbyterian Church was formed under the leadership of the Rev. John Knox Witherspoon. Included among the charter members were the daughter and granddaughter of the . . . — Map (db m121985) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — C-33 — James Walker Hood
Asst. Superintendent Public Instruction, 1868-70; a founder Livingstone College, 1885; Bishop A.M.E. Zion Church; founded St. Peters, 1864. One blk. N. — Map (db m24053) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — St. Peter's A.M.E. Zion Church
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m76961) HM
North Carolina (Craven County), New Bern — William Henry Singleton — From Slavery to Freedom
During the Civil War, thousands of enslaved blacks freed themselves by escaping to Union lines. Craven County native William Henry Singleton (1843-1938) was one of them. According to his biography, Recollections of My Slavery Days (1922), as . . . — Map (db m24054) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Cross Creek Linear Park — Our Pathway to the Future
1. Cool Spring Cool Spring is located on the south bank of Cross Creek, which winds its way through downtown Fayetteville. The spring was the primary soucre of water first for Native Americans and subsequently for the European pioneers. It . . . — Map (db m31149) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — First Presbyterian Church
Organized in 1800. The original building, begun in 1816, rebuilt on same walls after fire of 1831, stands one block west. — Map (db m24390) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-28 — First Presbyterian Church
Organized in 1800. The original building, begun in 1816, rebuilt on same walls after fire of 1831, stands one block east. — Map (db m24392) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-62 — Henry Evans
Free black cobbler & minister. Built first Methodist church in Fayetteville. Died 1810. Buried 2 blocks north. — Map (db m30884) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-79 — John England — 1786 - 1842
Bishop of Charleston. He organized Roman Catholics in N.C. at Fayetteville Convention, & consecrated St. Patrick Church, 1829. Present church 4/10 mi. E. — Map (db m24634) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-13 / 429 — MacPherson Church — American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site
Presbyterian. Founded by early Scottish settlers. Graves of Alexander MacPherson and T. H. Holmes, a Confederate general, 1 1/2 miles N. — Map (db m121984) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-55 — Methodist University
Chartered 1956 as four-year liberal arts college. Opened September 1960. University since 2006. — Map (db m30572) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — 89 — Omar Ibn Said
Muslim slave & scholar. African born, he penned autobiography in Arabic. 1831. Lived in a Bladen County and worshipped with local Presbyterians. — Map (db m94902) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Saint Patrick Catholic Church
. . . — Map (db m24636) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Grays Creek — I-59 — Dunn’s Creek Quaker Meeting
Started about 1746; joined yearly meeting, 1760; discontinued about 1781. Site and cemetery are 2.5 miles S.E. — Map (db m1946) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Hope Mills — I-27 — Cape Fear Baptist Church
Constituted in 1756 as Particular Baptist. Stephen Hollingsworth, first minister. Present (1859) building 2 mi. E. — Map (db m864) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Linden — I-52 — Rev. James Campbell
One of early Presbyterian ministers in N.C., 1757-1780. Organized Bluff, Barbecue, and Longstreet churches. Grave is 8 mi. east. — Map (db m42003) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Wade — I-1 — Old Bluff Church — Presbyterian
Organized in 1758 by Rev. James Campbell. Present building erected about 1858. N.W. 1 mi. — Map (db m31592) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Wade — Old Bluff Church — The Muddy Road to Averasboro — Carolinas Campaign —
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savanna, Georgia, after the "March to the Sea." Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to . . . — Map (db m31593) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Corolla Chapel
Historic Corolla Chapel In 1885, the Corolla community formed an inter-denominational congregation in Corolla Village and built the original one-room chapel. Circuit-riding preachers were sent to the Village by horse and buggy by way of the . . . — Map (db m91795) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Moyock — A-59 — Joseph Pilmoor
Preached first Methodist sermon in colony, 1772, at Currituck Courthouse. Pilmoor Memorial Methodist Church is near the site. About 300 ft. north. — Map (db m2763) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — B-44 — Andrew Cartwright
Agent of the American Colonization Society in Liberia, founded the A. M. E. Zion Churches in Albemarle area. His first church, 1865, near here. — Map (db m9462) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — K 49 — Pilgrim Church
Established ca. 1757 as German Reformed. Known early as Leonard's Church. Fourth Building to occupy site stands 3/8 mi. NW. — Map (db m70026) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — K 32 — John H. Mills
First head of Oxford Orphanage (1873-1884) and Thomasville Baptist Orphanage (Mills Home), president Oxford Female College. Grave 100 yds. S. — Map (db m70024) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — A Legacy of Community and Institutional Connections
Since 1898, White Rock Baptist Church, St. Joseph A.M.E. Church, Stanford L. Warren Library, Lincoln Hospital, John Avery Boys and Girls Club, North Carolina College, and Durham Public Schools are all connected historically to black businesses on . . . — Map (db m126157) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Centennial Chapel — North Carolina Central University Historical Marker
Holy Cross Church, established in Durham in 1939 by the Maryland Province of the Society of Jesus, was among North Carolina's earliest African-American Catholic congregations. A rectory was built in 1942 with one room serving as the chapel, and this . . . — Map (db m126194) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Emanuel J. Evans, 1907-1997, and Sara N. Evans, 1905-1986
"Mutt" and Sara Evans were civic, business and faith leaders during Durham's fast-changing, mid-20th century decades. Elected Mayor for a record six terms, Mutt Evans served from 1951 to 1963, holding together a diverse coalition of interests . . . — Map (db m126207) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — 12 — St. Philip's Episcopal Church — 1907 — Historic Preservation Society of Durham —
Church building designed in the Rural English Gothic style by the noted Boston architect Ralph Adams Cram. It stands on the site of the original frame church built in 1880. Downtown Durham Historic District — Map (db m126188) HM
North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Tarboro — E-85 — John C. Dancy — 1857 ~ 1920
Editor of A.M.E. Zion Church papers; orator; a delegate to Methodist world conference; customs collector of Wilmington. Home stood 3 blks. E. — Map (db m45347) HM
North Carolina (Edgecombe County), Tarboro — St. Paul A.M.E. Zion Church — Historical Marker
St. Paul A.M.E. Zion Church was organized on the fourth Sunday in March 1866 under the leadership of George C. Caine. The house of worship was erected on the corner of St. David and Granville Streets in 1869. We are grateful to God for . . . — Map (db m46638) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Alpha Chapel — constructed 1895
"Alpha Chapel — This name has been given the new Chapel midway between Bethania and Rural Hall. The very name "Alpha" is a significant one; inasmuch as this is the first step the Bethania congregation has ever taken in the direction Of . . . — Map (db m140188) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Bethania — Founded 12 June 1759
First planned Moravian Village in N. Carolina. Colonial and antebellum trade and agricultural center. Only remaining continuous, independent Wachovia Settlement. Contains unique remnants of original medieval style plan where families lived in a . . . — Map (db m52627) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Bethania — Bethania — Established 1759
The Moravian Church is a Protestant denomination tracing its roots to the followers of Jan Hus. A Czech priest and reformer, Hus was martyred for his faith in 1415. The Moravians founded a church body dedicated to a simple and devout life. For . . . — Map (db m140201) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Clemmons — J-66 — McKnight's Meeting House
Est. by Methodists ca. 1782. Annual Conferences held here in 1789, 1790, & 1791 by Bishop Asbury. Site was 400 yards N.W. — Map (db m51878) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Concord United Methodist Church
Founded in 1782. Called Waggoner's Chapel by Bishop Asbury. Present sanctuary built in 1908. Oldest Methodist congregation in Forsyth County, according to Methodists in assembly. — Map (db m53025) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Lewisville Baptist Church — Established 1881 — Lewisville's First Organized Baptist Church —
Lewisville Baptist Church was established in 1881. In 1882 on this highest knoll in the Lewisville village, a 40'x60' wooden building with double doors and a stately steeple was built. Following destruction by lightning in 1936, it was replaced with . . . — Map (db m53022) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Lewisville United Methodist Church — Establised 1878
The church was established in 1878 by Methodists from Brookstown and Sharon. The chief founder, Augustus Eugene Conrad, made plans for the first church, a one room building, and it was dedicated in 1882. It was replaced with a three-story brick . . . — Map (db m53023) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Methodist Church Parsonage
In 1884 the Forsyth Circuit of the Methodist Church bought this house, known as the Wesley Vogler house, for a parsonage. The Circuit consisted of twelve churches in western Forsyth County. By 1901 the Lewisville Charge had been created and took . . . — Map (db m53020) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — New Hope AME Zion Church — 1883 — Date of Deed
New Hope Church is the oldest continuing African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church within the Township of Lewisville. This church is among the oldest AME Zion congregations in Forsyth County. — Map (db m54288) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Lewisville — Shiloh Lutheran Church
Founded in 1777 as the German Church Beyond Muddy Creek. Named Gerber's Church in 1813. Graveyard and old church site, quarter mile east. Called Shiloh since circa 1860. Present sanctuary built in 1883. Oldest congregation in Lewisville. — Map (db m53024) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Oldtown — Gemeinhaus 1756
This large two-story log building was the first Moravian Congregation House, or church, in North Carolina. It was begun in 1755 and consecrated in February, 1756. It contained the Gemeinsaal (meeting hall) and living quarters for the Minister's . . . — Map (db m53518) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Pfafftown — Brookstown United Methodist Church — Established 1853
Founded by the Phillip N. Mock family who gave one acre of land for the church. Founding members of the congregation donated timber and labor for the construction of the original, single-room log building. The second building was constructed in . . . — Map (db m53724) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Rural Hall — J-51 — Nazareth Church
Lutheran. Begun about 1778 by German settlers. Formerly called "Old Dutch Meeting House." Present building, 1878. — Map (db m52533) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-65 — Fraternity Church of the Brethren
Oldest German Baptist (Dunker) congregation in North Carolina. Est. ca. 1775 near Muddy Creek, one mile south. — Map (db m51880) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-63 — Friedberg Church
Moravian. Begun in 1759, organized in 1773; first church and school built in 1769. Third structure, 1825; located 1.6 mi. W. — Map (db m51881) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Gemeinhaus — 1788
The only German Colonial Church with attached living quarters remaining in the United States. Moravian Wachovia tract leader Frederic Marshall designed building. — Map (db m51998) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Lloyd Presbyterian Church
The congregation of Lloyd Presbyterian Church was formed in the 1870s as part of a national movement by Northern missionaries to establish African-American Presbyterian churches in the South. Lloyd Presbyterian Church's current building was . . . — Map (db m51974) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — New Bethel Baptist Church
In 1890, New Bethel Baptist Church was organized by the Reverend George Holland, a minister from Danville, Virginia. The congregation first met in the Trade Street home of John Lee and his wife, Alice Snow Lee. The 25-member congregation later . . . — Map (db m98783) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Salem Moravian Graveyard
The Moravian Graveyard is still known fondly by the old Germanic name of "God’s Acre" (Gottesacker). This burial ground is characterized by its simplicity and uniformity. As the name implies, this is a field where the bodies are "sown as perishable . . . — Map (db m54684) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Silver Hill
Silver Hill, a small, L-shaped 1880s African-American neighborhood of modest houses built by tobacco workers and domestic servants, predated the white subdivision of Buena Vista that developed around it. The community housed approximately 12 . . . — Map (db m135918) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — The Brothers' Spring and The African School
The Brothers' Spring, located down this slope, provided clean water, an important campsite, and a recreational park in the 18th and 19th centuries. On this hill in 1867, freedmen of the area and the Salem African Church (St. Phillips Moravian) . . . — Map (db m136558) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — Thomas J. Wilson
This site marks the location where Thomas J. Wilson built the first home in what would become the town of Winston. Wilson had received permission from the Moravian Church in 1847 to erect his dwelling north of Salem's central area, as he wanted to . . . — Map (db m98780) HM
North Carolina (Forsyth County), Winston-Salem — J-110 — Wachovia Tract
On Dec. 27, 1752, survey for Moravian settlement began near here. Bishop August Spangenberg led frontier expedition that selected 98,985 acres. — Map (db m51879) HM
North Carolina (Franklin County), Franklinton — E62 — Moses A. Hopkins
U. S. Minister to Liberia, 1885-1886. Negro clergyman. Founder and principal of Albion Academy which stood 2 blocks E. — Map (db m41009) HM
North Carolina (Franklin County), Louisburg — E 26 — Louisburg College
Opened in 1857 on the site of the Franklin Academy, chartered 1787. Now a Methodist Junior College, coeducational. — Map (db m77881) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Belmont — O 57 — Belmont Abbey College
Roman Catholic. Liberal arts coeducational college. Founded, 1876, by Order of St. Benedict. One mile north. — Map (db m108787) HM
North Carolina (Gaston County), Belmont — O 20 — Goshen Presbyterian Church
Established 1764. Rev. Humphrey Hunter, the first minister, arrived in 1796. Moved to present site, 2 mi. NW, in 1956. — Map (db m108786) HM
North Carolina (Granville County), Oxford — G-73 — Harris Meeting House
Founded by Methodists prior to 1778. It was the mother church in this area. Disbanded in 1828. Stood 1 mi. N. — Map (db m844) HM
North Carolina (Granville County), Oxford — Katherine Blount Skinner Lassiter — 1826–1903
In loving memory of Katherine Blount Skinner Lassiter (1826–1903) and of those who in this home lived under her Christian influence and in the shadow of old Saint Stephen’s Church during the days of the War Between the States, this house . . . — Map (db m27460) HM
North Carolina (Granville County), Stovall — G 86 — Henry Pattillo — 1726-1801
Presbyterian minister, legislator, author of textbooks. Served many churches in Virginia & North Carolina. Home & school Ό mile West. — Map (db m9441) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-33 — Buffalo Church
Presbyterian, organized about 1756. Present building, the third, was erected in 1827. Revolutionary soldiers buried here. — Map (db m30836) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
[ Upper Marker ] Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Wilbur Lee Mapp 1994 [ Main Marker ] Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned to speak at Trinity AME Zion Church in Greensboro (a few blocks from here) on April 4, 1968. He canceled his . . . — Map (db m54074) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-74 — Immanuel College
Lutheran. Founded 1903, and moved here in 1905; prepared black students for work in theology & education. Closed 1961. — Map (db m31086) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-75 — New Garden Friends Meeting
Meeting for worship was begun in 1751; became a Monthly Meeting, 1754. Present bldg. is here. — Map (db m74937) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Original Methodist Church / Former Methodist Cemetery
(side 1) Original Methodist Church 1831 Here in 1830-31, 64 Methodists led by Peter Doub built the first church in Greensboro. Moving to a second church on West Market Street in 1851, the congregation relocated a third and final . . . — Map (db m35093) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Richardson Civic Center
On this site, members of the First Presbyterian Church of Greensboro built their first house of worship in 1832, and on the adjacent land citizens of Greensboro erected the first graded public school in North Carolina in 1875. These grounds and the . . . — Map (db m54095) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — West Market Street United Methodist Church
Has Been Placed On The National Register Of Historic Places — Map (db m99683) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — J 95 — Springfield Friends Meeting
Established in 1773 and organized as a Monthly Meeting, 1790. Building erected 1927 on original site is ½ mile east. — Map (db m58267) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — J-49 — Deep River Friends Meeting
Was begun in 1753 and organized as a Monthly Meeting, 1778. Present building erected 1875. — Map (db m57659) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Jamestown Friends Meeting House and Cemetery
This Quaker place of worship, built by the Mendenhall family around 1819, was used when bad weather made the one-mile trip to Deep River Fiends Meeting House impossible. It is located on its original site, across from Mendenhall Plantation. The . . . — Map (db m34704) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Oakdale United Methodist Church
Oakdale United Methodist Church began as a brush arbor meeting at the entrance to the mill village, built by members of the community. After the Little Schoolhouse was built in the early 1880's, the church met here there. In 1915, a church was built . . . — Map (db m98613) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Whitsett — J 107 — Wadsworth Church
Congregational. Founded 1870 by former slave Rev. Madison Lindsay. Restored 1885 building is 80 yards southwest. — Map (db m77292) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Enfield — E 73 — Eden Church
Methodist. An active congregation by 1789. Present building, 1890-1900, is third on site. — Map (db m70520) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Enfield — E 79 — Henry B. Bradford — 1761 - 1833
Early Methodist Protestant minister; educator; and soldier in the Revolution. Founded Bradford's Church on this site circa 1792. — Map (db m31070) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Halifax — The Free Church of Halifax
In 1793, the first Halifax church was built at this location. The Free Church was open to all denominations. Services were held until the 1850’s when congregations began to build their own churches. In 1911 the church fell in disrepair and . . . — Map (db m60694) HM
North Carolina (Halifax County), Scotland Neck — E-50 — Trinity Church
Episcopal. Established about 1732. This building, the third, was erected in 1854, in part with brick from an older church. — Map (db m31212) HM
North Carolina (Harnett County), Buies Creek — H-62 — Campbell University
Baptist. Founded in 1887 by James A. Campbell as Buie's Creek Academy. A university since 1979. — Map (db m31604) HM
North Carolina (Harnett County), Dunn — H 118 — G. B. Cashwell — 1862-1916
"Pentecostal Apostle of the South." Inspired by Azusa Street Mission in Los Angeles in 1906, he led revival Ό mi. S.W. — Map (db m70382) HM
North Carolina (Harnett County), Sanford — H 57 — Barbecue Church
Presbyterian, founded in 1757 by Scottish Highlanders. Present building, the third, erected about 1895, is 200 yds. northeast. — Map (db m100882) HM
North Carolina (Haywood County), Canton — Locust Field Cemetery — Confederate Rendezvous
The first Locust Old Fields Baptist Church was established here in 1803. It was among the first churches established west of Asheville. Although the original building no longer stands, it served the small community here for many years as a house of . . . — Map (db m75504) HM
North Carolina (Haywood County), Canton — P-19 — Morning Star Church
Organized by German Lutherans about 1825; Methodist since 1866. Is 2½ miles south. — Map (db m17098) HM
North Carolina (Haywood County), Clyde — The Shook House
Home of Jacob Shook and Preaching place of Francis Asbury, pioneer bishop of American Methodism. "After crossing other streams, and losing ourselves in the woods, we came in about 9 o'clock at night to Vater Shuck's. What an awful day!" Asbury's . . . — Map (db m33716) HM
North Carolina (Haywood County), Cove Creek — P-51 — "Cataloochee Trail"
Indian path across the mountains used by early settlers and in 1810 by Bishop Francis Asbury. Trail passed nearby. — Map (db m11923) HM
North Carolina (Haywood County), Maggie Valley — Bishop Francis Asbury — 1745 - 1816 —
. . . — Map (db m17350) HM
North Carolina (Haywood County), Waterville — Francis Asbury Trail
Francis Asbury, first elected Bishop of Methodism in the U.S.; rode on horseback over 275,000 miles over pioneer trails averaging one sermon a day. From New England to Charleston, S.C. More than 60 times he crossed the Appalachians. Once following . . . — Map (db m90574) HM
North Carolina (Haywood County), Waynesville — Turpin's Chapel - Maple Grove United Methodist Church
Founded 1865 by Capt. John Turpin, CSA (NC)-POW Non-denominational until 1885. Became Turpin's Chapel MEC (South) 1885. Name changed to Maple Grove MEC (South) 1912. Became Maple Grove Methodist Church 1949 and Maple Grove United Methodist Church . . . — Map (db m19734) HM
North Carolina (Henderson County), Flat Rock — P 31 — St. John in the Wilderness
Episcopal Church, built 1833-34 as a private chapel. Given to Diocese of North Carolina, 1836. Enlarged in 1852. — Map (db m12381) HM
North Carolina (Henderson County), Fletcher — P 1 — Calvary Church Episcopal
Built 1859. Grave of "Bill" Nye. Memorials to many famous Southerners. — Map (db m12885) HM
North Carolina (Henderson County), Fletcher — Calvary Episopal Church — Flether, N.C.
One of the oldest Churches in Western North Carolina Organized 1857 - Built 1859 Consecrated by the Rt. Rev. Thos. Atkinson Bishop of North Carolina August 21, 1859 During the Civil War this church was used as barracks by Confederate . . . — Map (db m12883) HM
North Carolina (Henderson County), Fletcher — George Westfeldt
In Loving Memory George Westfeldt A member of Calvary Episcopal Church Fletcher, N.C. to whom Sidney Lanier a visitor here beloved poet of the South dedicated his last poem, "Sunrise," "Send him my sunrise, That he may know How . . . — Map (db m81018) HM
North Carolina (Hoke County), Raeford — I-45 — Sherman's March
General Sherman, with a part of his army, on March 9-10, 1865, camped here at Bethel Presbyterian Church (organized before 1800). — Map (db m31255) HM
North Carolina (Iredell County), Harmony — Harmony Hill Camp Meeting — 1846
A two-week camp meeting was organized here as early as 1846 by North Iredell Protestants. It continues today on the second Sunday in October as a one-day event. Harmony School is built on the original site. — Map (db m55345) HM
North Carolina (Iredell County), Statesville — M 46 — Fourth Creek Meeting House
Presbyterian. Established ca. 1750; on this site by 1756. The Rev. James Hall first regular minister. — Map (db m51804) HM
North Carolina (Lee County), Sanford — H 51 — Buffalo Church
Presbyterian. Founded in 1797 by Scottish Highlanders. Present building, the fourth, erected 1880, stands on original site. — Map (db m87809) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — The Site of Harriet's Chapel — Harriet's Chapel Battlefield Park — Battle of Kinston Military Park —
Harriet’s Chapel saw some of the most intense fighting of the Battle of Kinston. In 2010, Historical Preservation Group moved this building, once New Beaverdam Primitive Baptist Church, to this site to interpret Harriet’s Chapel’s role in the . . . — Map (db m70418) HM
North Carolina (Lenoir County), Kinston — F 40 — Wheat Swamp Church
Disciples of Christ since 1843. Organized about 1760 as Free Will Baptist. Part of present church built in 1858. One mile northwest. — Map (db m31205) HM
North Carolina (Lincoln County), Lincolnton — "Old White Church" Cemetery / " Old White Church "
"Old White Church" Cemetery First Burying Ground in Lincolnton ca. 1787 Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior

" Old White Church" Lincolnton's original house of worship . . . — Map (db m44431) HM

North Carolina (Lincoln County), Lincolnton — O 60 — Andrew Loretz
Minister, 1786-1812, of German Reformed Church in the Carolinas. Home built in 1793. Located one-half mile south. — Map (db m45106) HM
North Carolina (Lincoln County), Lincolnton — O 67 — Daniels Church
Evangelical Lutheran. Organized in 1774. J.G. Arndt was first regular minister; Philip Henkel assistant. This building, 1888, is third on site. — Map (db m45105) HM
North Carolina (Lincoln County), Lincolnton — O 45 — J.G. Arends
Native German, pioneer teacher and minister, ordained 1775, first president of the N.C. Lutheran Synod, 1803. Grave a few yds. east. — Map (db m44402) HM
North Carolina (Martin County), Robersonville — B 45 — Flat Swamp Church
Primitive Baptist. Begun in 1776. First pastor was John Page. Second building on site. Two miles S. — Map (db m105461) HM
North Carolina (Martin County), Williamston — Skewarkee Primitive Baptist Church
The Skewarkee Meeting House was formed in 1789 and assumed a 'mantel of authority' for smaller congregations between the Roanoke and Tar Rivers as well as the Kehukee Association. In 1839, on land donated by Brother Joseph D. Biggs, the present . . . — Map (db m70516) HM
North Carolina (Martin County), Williamston — B 40 — Skewarkey Church
Baptist congregation formed about 1780. Primitive Baptist since 1830's. Church here was built in 1853. — Map (db m70515) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Charlotte — Graham Family Homeplace
Built by Billy's Father William Franklin Graham, in the 1920's on Park Road, just a few miles east of this site. — Map (db m88580) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Charlotte — St. Peter's Episcopal Church
St.Peter's Episcopal Church was established as a mission in 1834 and became a parish in the episcopal diocese of North Carolina in 1844. The first church building was located on West Trade Street a few blocks from the square. The church purchased . . . — Map (db m16827) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Charlotte — L 107 — Steele Creek Church
The Presbyterian congregation was organized before 1760 by Scots-Irish settlers. Robert Henry, the first permanent pastor, arrived in 1766. Rev. James McRee served from 1778 to 1797. Sugar Creek was the first Presbyterian church in the region, . . . — Map (db m109845) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Charlotte — 16 — Thaddeus Lincoln Tate — Business and Civic Leader
Noted African-American businessman and civic leader Thaddeus (Thad) Lincoln Tate contributed significantly to the betterment of the Charlotte community in the early to mid-20th century. From the 1890s to the 1940s, Mr. Tate owned the Uptown . . . — Map (db m126031) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Huntersville — “Upping Block”
Used near here in early days of this church Presbyterian Church Beatties Ford Road Huntersville, N.C. — Map (db m63276) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Huntersville — Hopewell Presbyterian Church
Hopewell Presbyterian Church organized 1762 by Rev. Alexander McWhorter for the Synod of Philadelphia, Pa. First permanent Pastor Rev. Samuel C. Caldwell ( Second Marker : ) Hopewell Presbyterian Church has been placed on the National . . . — Map (db m63388) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Huntersville — The Church Building
The building before you dates back to 1833. It is the oldest, standing, continuously used worship facility in Mecklenburg County. It was the second bricked Presbyterian Church in rural North Carolina. As the third building on the site, it pre-dates . . . — Map (db m63271) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Huntersville — The Oldest Cemetery and the Walls
You are standing before the oldest continuously existing human institution in northern Mecklenburg County: Hopewell Presbyterian Church. There were seven churches in this southern region of North Carolina Piedmont before the Revolutionary War. . . . — Map (db m63275) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Huntersville — The Servant Entrance
The door to your left was called the “servant entrance”. Actually it was the entrance and exit for slaves who were members of the church. Presbyterians rarely used the term “slave” preferring “servant”. The door . . . — Map (db m63273) HM
North Carolina (Mecklenburg County), Mint Hill — L-9 — Philadelphia Presbyterian Church
Congregation organized 1770. David Barr, first pastor. Building, completed 1826, is 1/4 mi. E. — Map (db m143102) HM
North Carolina (Moore County), Robbins — K-47 — John Bethune
Early pastor for Scots in N.C.; chaplain for Loyalists at Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, 1776. First Presbyterian minister in Ontario. Lived 4 mi. S. — Map (db m64843) HM
North Carolina (Nash County), Rocky Mount — Bishop FC Barnes — June 22, 1929 - July 11, 2011
Bishop FC Barnes founded and established the Red Budd Holy Church in May of 1959 in Castalia, NC. He pastored Red Budd for over 52 years. Bishop Barnes was not only an awesome pastor, teacher and preacher, but he was also a renowned gospel singer. . . . — Map (db m97973) HM
North Carolina (Nash County), Rocky Mount — E-88 — Falls of the Tar Church
Constituted as Particular Baptist, 1757; Rev. John Moore & Joshua Lawrence among early ministers. Now Primitive Baptist. — Map (db m44751) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilington — D 78 — St. Mark’s
Consecrated in 1875 as first Episcopal church for colored people in North Carolina. Served by Bishop Atkinson. It is located 3 blocks east. — Map (db m28872) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 59 — Adam Empie, D.D.
First chaplain of U.S. Military Academy, West Point, 1813-1817; president William and Mary College; rector St. James Church. Grave Ύ mi. N.E. — Map (db m28724) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Grace Methodist Church — Organized December 24, 1797
Since that date four sanctuaries have burned, 1803–1843–1886–1947. Present imposing and lovely church was dedicated to the glory of God and service to mankind May 15, 1955. Body of Reverend Wm. Meredith, founder of Methodism in . . . — Map (db m28940) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — Historic First Baptist Church — Organized 1808
First building southeast corner of Front and Ann Streets. Present building erected 1860-1870. Rev. John L. Prichard, pastor, died a martyr to humanity in the yellow fever plague, 1862. To The Glory Of Christ Who Sets Men Free — Map (db m144200) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 41 — James Gibbons
Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, 1886-1921. Installed as vicar apostolic of North Carolina (1868-72) at St. Thomas Church ½ bl. W. — Map (db m28725) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 38 — Mary Baker Glover Eddy
Founder of Christian Science Church. Spent part of 1844 at Hanover House, 2 blocks west. — Map (db m28755) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 5 — St. James Church
Built 1839, near site of older church, begun about 1751. Graves of Cornelius Harnett and Thomas Godfrey. — Map (db m28757) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — St. James Church — Thomas U. Walter, Architect – Philadelphia — 1839/40; 1885 —
Thomas U. Walter, Architect – Philadelphia John S. Norris, Supervising Architect – New York C. H. Dahl, Principal Carpenter – New York John C. Wood, Principal Mason – Nantucket Oldest house of worship in Wilmington, . . . — Map (db m28925) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — St. Mark’s Episcopal Church — Emerson and Fehmer, Boston, Architects; Alfred Howe, Builder — 1871–1875 —
Gothic Revival style church built for congregation organized in 1869. The cornerstone was laid March 23, 1871 and the edifice completed under the leadership of the Rev. Charles O. Brady. Dedicated on March 23, 1871, it was the first Episcopal church . . . — Map (db m28877) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 77 — St. Stephen A.M.E. Church
Congregation formed in 1865. Present church constructed 1880 on land donated by Geo. Peabody. Located 2 blocks east. — Map (db m77229) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 44 — Temple of Israel
Erected 1875-6. First house of worship built in North Carolina by the Jews. Congregation established in 1867. — Map (db m28758) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 87 — Thomas Atkinson — 1807 - 1881
Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of N.C., 1853-1881. Voice for church unity in postwar years. Interred in the church. — Map (db m28753) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 39 — Thomas F. Price
Roman Catholic priest, pioneer Home Missionary of N.C. Co-founder of “Maryknoll Fathers,” a foreign mission society. Birthplace (1860) one block east. — Map (db m29967) HM
North Carolina (New Hanover County), Wilmington — D 31 — Woodrow Wilson
President of the United States, 1913-1921. His home, 1874-1882, was the Presbyterian manse, which stood one block E. — Map (db m28731) HM
North Carolina (Northampton County), Rich Square — E 42 — Lemuel Burkitt
Pastor Sandy Run Baptist Church, 1773-1807. A founder & historian, Kehukee Baptist Assn.; member N.C. convention, 1788. Grave 300 yds. E. — Map (db m60658) HM
North Carolina (Orange County), Hillsborough — G-64 — Moses A. Curtis
Botanist, authority on North American flora, author, and Episcopal minister. Home was two blocks east. — Map (db m98534) HM
North Carolina (Pasquotank County), Elizabeth City — A-43 — Mount Lebanon Church
A.M.E. Zion. Organized about 1850 as mission to serve black Methodists. Since 1856 congregation has met 1½ blocks N. — Map (db m5528) HM
North Carolina (Perquimans County), Hertford — Edmundson-Fox Memorial
Near this spot William Edmundson, an English Friend, held in May 1672, the first religious service on record in Carolina. Six months later, George Fox, Founder of the Religious Society of Friends also visited this section and held meetings . . . — Map (db m4133) HM
North Carolina (Perquimans County), Hertford — A79 — Quaker Activity
In 1672, missionaries William Edmundson and George Fox, founder of Society of Friends, in America, held religious meetings in this area. — Map (db m4093) HM
North Carolina (Pitt County), Greenville — F-46 — Baptist State Convention
On March 26, 1830, the North Carolina Baptist State Convention was organized at the Gorham home which was near here. — Map (db m65362) HM
North Carolina (Pitt County), Greenville — Red Banks Church — "... suddenly and unexpectedly met the enemy"
Federal expeditions frequently disrupted Confederate activities late in 1863. Union forces often assembled here at Red Banks Church because it was near Confederate camps. On December 17, 1863, a Federal attack near here on the camp of Co. H, 3rd . . . — Map (db m70496) HM
North Carolina (Randolph County), Trinity — Trinity Cemetery —
Here lie Braxton Craven and other builders of churches and colleges in the south, notably Duke University. — Map (db m58265) HM
North Carolina (Richmond County), Rockingham — K-42 — Cartledge Creek Baptist Church
Originally Dockery's Meeting House, about 1774. Baptist State Convention, 1833, voted here to found Wake Forest Institute. About 4 miles North — Map (db m31517) HM

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Apr. 8, 2020