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Colonial Era Historical Markers

 
Sawyer's Rock Marker image, Touch for more information
By Richard E. Miller, July 4, 2009
Sawyer's Rock Marker
New Hampshire (Carroll County), Hart's Location — 186 — Sawyer's Rock
In 1771, Timothy Lash of Lancaster and Benjamin Sawyer of Conway made a bargain with Governor John Wentworth to bring a horse through Crawford Notch in order to prove the route’s commercial value. The pair succeeded by dragging and lowering the . . . — Map (db m75235) HM
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Chesterfield — 060 — First Methodist Meeting Place In New Hampshire
In 1772 "the people called Methodist" held their first religious meeting in this state on the James Robertson farm, 1.2 miles north of here, on Christian Street, with Philip Embury as the preacher. On June 20, 1803, Francis Asbury spoke here using . . . — Map (db m85918) HM
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Fitzwilliam — 99 — Brigadier General James Reed(1722-1807)
This veteran Captain of the French and Indian War, born in Woburn, Mass., settled here about 1765 as an original proprietor of Monadnock No. 4, now Fitzwilliam. After the Battle of Lexington, he recruited several companies to form the Third New . . . — Map (db m136527) HM WM
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Keene — Deacon Josiah Fisher
Near this spot Deacon Josiah Fisher was killed and scalped by an Indian, July 10, 1745, a pioneer settler of this town in 1734. — Map (db m70320) HM
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Keene — The First Meeting House in Upper Ashuelot
The First Meeting House in Upper Ashuelot, now Keene was built on this knoll in 1736-7. Here also was located the Burying Ground of the original settlers. Erected by Ashuelot Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution in 1913 — Map (db m59779) HM
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Keene — The Old Fort
This boulder marks the site of the old fort built in 1738 by the early settlers of Upper Ashuelot as a refuge from the Indians — Map (db m59781) HM
New Hampshire (Cheshire County), Walpole — John Kilburn Cabin
. . . — Map (db m66284) HM WM
New Hampshire (Coos County), Pinkham's Grant — 011 — First Ascent of Mount Washington
Darby Field, a New Hampshire settler, accomplished this difficult feat in 1642 from a southerly approach. Partly guided by Indians and with only primitive equipment at his disposal, he is thus alleged to be the originator of all Mount Washington . . . — Map (db m77638) HM
New Hampshire (Grafton County), Bath — 121 — Bath, New Hampshire
Settled in 1766 by Jaasiel Harriman whose cabin was near the Great Rock. His nine year old daughter Mercy carried dirt in her apron to the top of this unique rock formation. Here she planted corn, pumpkins and cucumbers, making the first garden . . . — Map (db m74569) HM
New Hampshire (Grafton County), Enfield — The Enfield Shakers
The Enfield Shakers Founded in 1793, Shaker Village was the 9th of the original Shaker communities established in the U.S. At its peak c.1850 some 300 Shakers lived, worked and worshipped here, practicing equality of the sexes, celibacy, pacifism, . . . — Map (db m98107) HM
New Hampshire (Grafton County), Franconia — A Bit of History
The land you see as you stand here all lies within the township of Lincoln, granted on January 31, 1764 to James Avery and others and named after Henry Clinton, ninth Earl of Lincoln. The original grant contained 32,456 acres. Settlers did not . . . — Map (db m76422) HM
New Hampshire (Grafton County), Franconia — Why is it called A NOTCH?
When North America was first settled, pioneers built their homes of logs. To aid in falling the timber, they made U or V-shaped cuts at the tree’s base. Similar cuts were made in the logs to hold their cabins together. They called these cuts . . . — Map (db m105988) HM
New Hampshire (Hillsborough County), Bedford — 102 — Colonel John Goffe(1701 - 1786)
This is considered to be the site of Colonel John Goffe's log dwelling. In 1744 Goffe build a gristmill on Bowman's Brook, later run by his son, Major John Goffe (1727–1813), and his grandson, Theodore Atkinson Goffe (1769–1860). The . . . — Map (db m88052) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Boscawen — 0049 — Hannah Dustin1657 - 1737
Famous symbol of frontier heroism. A victim of an Indian raid in 1697 on Haverhill, Massachusetts, whence she had been taken to a camp site on the nearby island in the river. After killing and later scalping ten Indians, she and the two . . . — Map (db m129625) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Boscawen — Heroum GestaFides Justitia
(Front/West side) Hannah Duston Mary Neff Samuel Leonardson March 30 1697 Mid-night (Front base of monument) David Blanchard W. Concord, N.H. (Right/South side) Statua Know ye that we with many . . . — Map (db m135432) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Eastman
Erected By The Eastman Association In Memory of Captain Ebenezer Eastman First Settler of Concord 1727 1924 — Map (db m129848) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — First Session of the Legislature at Concord
The first session of the Legislature at Concord was held in this building March 1782 — Map (db m115944) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Main Street's OriginsDowntown Concord — Est. 1725 —
Downtown Emerges Ever since Concord was first settled in 1726, Main Street has been its principal thoroughfare. The town's first plan shows an unnamed street that follows the same path as today's Main Street. The 1-1/2 mile route was . . . — Map (db m115859) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — On The Interval Below This Spot
On the interval below this spot a committee of the General Court of Massachusetts Bay, their surveyors and attendants there present to locate and survey the Plantation of Penny Cook, conducted the first religious service ever held in the central . . . — Map (db m129757) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — 110 — Ratification of the Federal Constitution
The convention of delegates from 175 New Hampshire towns took place on June 21, 1788, in the Old North Meeting House which stood on this site from 1751 until destroyed by fire in 1870. The delegates approved the proposed Federal Constitution by . . . — Map (db m130008) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Site of First Block House
Site of First Block House Erected 1726-7. Used As Meeting House Town House And School House. — Map (db m130508) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Site of First Ferry
Site of First Ferry Established by Capt. Ebenezer Eastman 1727. -------------- Tucker's Ferry 1785. -------------- Federal Bridge 1798. — Map (db m129801) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Site of Rumford Garrison No. 5
Around house of Lieut. Jeremiah Stickney to which were assigned May 15, 1746 twenty settlers with their families — Map (db m132187) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Site of Rumford Garrison No. 6
Around house of Joseph Hall to which were assigned May 15, 1746 fifteen settlers with their families. — Map (db m132185) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — Site of Rumford Garrison No. 7
Around house of [Ti]mothy Walker, Jr. [To w]hich were assigned May 15, 1746 [Twenty] two settlers [And thei]r families — Map (db m132184) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — The First Garrison in Concord
Around this house was erected in 1746 the first stated garrison in Concord to protect from the French and Indian enemy the families of Rev. Timothy Walker, Capt. John Chandler, Abraham Bradley, Samuel Bradley, John Webster, Nathaniel Rolf, Joseph . . . — Map (db m115939) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — 0238 — The Pennacook
When Europeans settled in New England in the 1620s, the largest Native American tribal group in the future state of New Hampshire used the flat lands and bends of the Merrimack River in present Concord for its central village. . . . — Map (db m130005) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — This Monument is in Memory of Samuel Bradley
This monument is in memory of Samuel Bradley Jonathan Bradley Obadiah Peters John Bean & John Lufkin Who were massacred August 11TH, 1746 By the Indians near This spot ~ Erected 1837 By Richard Bradley Son of the Hon. John Bradley, & . . . — Map (db m129598) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Dunbarton — 0111 — Molly Stark House
Built by her father, Capt. Caleb Page, c. 1759, this was Molly Page's home in her youth and as the wife of Gen. John Stark. Their first son, Caleb, who served with his illustrious father during the Revolution, was born here, as was Molly''s . . . — Map (db m130082) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Franklin — 0091 — Birthplace of Daniel Webster
Daniel Webster was born here January 18, 1782. Statesman and lawyer, he served as U.S. Congressman from New Hampshire and Massachusetts, Senator from Massachusetts and Secretary of State under Presidents Harrison, Tyler and Fillmore. A noted . . . — Map (db m131051) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Hopkinton — Woodwell's Garrison 1744
Woodwell's Garrison, 1744, Captured April 22, 1746 Stockade on opposite side of the road — Map (db m78995)
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Pembroke — 0144 — First Meeting House
This is the site of the first meeting house in Suncook, incorporated as Pembroke in 1759. Granted to soldiers in Lovewell's Indian War (1722-25) or their survivors, the land was largely settled by Congregationalists from Massachusetts Bay. . . . — Map (db m131384) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — 131 — Brigadier General Enoch Poor
Born in Andover, Mass. June 21, 1736, Enoch Poor settled in Exeter, becoming a successful merchant and ship-builder. In 1775 he was appointed colonel in the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment. Poor was at Stillwater, Saratoga and Monmouth, and served under . . . — Map (db m75241) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — Exeter NH Folsom and Gilman Marker
In honor of John Folsom and his wife Mary Gilman, progenitors of the American Folsoms, natives of Hingham, England emigrated 1638, settled Exeter 1655. This stone erected by their descendants on land granted to Lieutenant Peter Folsom, was once the . . . — Map (db m96467) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — 097 — Exeter Town House
The historic Town House of Exeter stood near this site. Here on January 5, 1776, the Provincial Congress adopted and signed the first state constitution thereby establishing an independent state government, the first of the thirteen colonies. The . . . — Map (db m75242) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — 161 — Ladd-Gilman House
Built about 1721 as one of New Hampshire’s earliest brick houses, and enlarged and clapboarded in the 1750s, this dwelling served as the state treasury during the Revolution. Here were born John Taylor Gilman (1753-1828), who was elected governor . . . — Map (db m75243) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — Powder House— 1771 —
At this site on the Squamscott river stands the storehouse for the town’s powder used during the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Powder captured from the British at New Castle was stored here and later used at the Battle of Bunker Hill. — Map (db m41157) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — Powder House— 1771 —
Directly across the Squamscott river stands the storehouse for the towns powder used during the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Powder captured from the British at New Castle was stored here and later used at the Battle of Bunker Hill. — Map (db m41158) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — 032 — Revolutionary Capital
Founded by Rev. John Wheelwright in 1638, Exeter was one of the four original towns in the colony. Following New Hampshire’s provisional declaration of independence on January 5, 1776, it served as the capital of the new state during the period of . . . — Map (db m75244) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — Second Burial Ground
Second Burial Ground Est. late 1600's Here is the last resting place of some of Exeter's early settlers. Samuel Dudley, respected minister who led Exeter's residents for 33 years. Nathaniel Ladd and family, influential community members, built the . . . — Map (db m96466) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Exeter — Site of the First Mill At Falls of the Squamscott River
A grist mill built by Thomas Wilson in 1640. The island and site were granted to him by the town which reserved the right for canoe landing and the laying of fish. Wilson’s Creek flows on the easterly side. — Map (db m41156) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Fremont — Historic Black Rocks Village / Historic Fremont, N.H.-Olde Poplin
(side 1) Historic Black Rocks Village Settled in the 1720's this section of Poplin, (now Fremont) between Scribner Road & Rowe's Gas Station at 225 Main Street, gradually grew into a thriving settlement called "Black Rocks . . . — Map (db m115780) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Fremont — John Prescott Lovering's Inncirca 1756
This old Inn/Tavern is one of the most historic landmarks in Fremont. The first Poplin (now Fremont) Town Meeting was held here at Lovering's Inn on August 27, 1764, as were many other Town Meetings. The towns' name was changed from Poplin . . . — Map (db m115814) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Fremont — 142 — Mast Tree Riot of 1734
Local lumbermen illegally cut Mast Trees reserved for the King's Royal Navy. When David Dunbar, Surveyor General, visited nearby Copyhold Mill to inspect fallen lumber, local citizens assembled, discharged firearms and convinced Dunbar to . . . — Map (db m115793) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Hampton — First Public School Marker
First Public School in New Hampshire, supported by taxation, was opened in Hampton on May 31, 1649. It was presided over by John Legat for the education of both sexes. The sole qualification for admission of the pupils was that they be . . . — Map (db m105144) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Kingston — 046 — Josiah Bartlett— 1729–1795 —
Distinguished participant in the founding of the Republic as signer of the Declaration of Independence and Articles of Confederation, and prominent in this State as Chief Justice of two courts and first holder of the title of Governor. An innovator . . . — Map (db m75245) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), New Castle — Frost Cemetery
The Frost Cemetery was a private family burying ground passed down through the Frost and Bell families for many generations. The families lived near the Piscataqua River and the cemetery was located at the end of their properties near the . . . — Map (db m135323) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Newmarket — Wentworth Cheswill(1746–1817)
One of the earliest students at Governor Dummer Academy in Massachusetts, Cheswill was among Newmarket’s best-educated and most prosperous citizens. He was entrusted with many offices, including justice of the peace, selectman, town clerk, . . . — Map (db m113341) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — African Burying Ground Memorial
(left panel) I stand for the Ancestors Here and Beyond I stand for those who feel anger I stand for those who were treated unjustly I stand for those who were taken from their loved ones I stand for those who suffered . . . — Map (db m115995) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Black Yankees and The SeaPortsmouth Black Heritage Trail
People of African origin or descent have been part of Portsmouth since at least 1645. This waterfront was an entry port for enslaved people arriving in New Hampshire during the 1600s and 1700s. Ships brought black children and adults directly . . . — Map (db m115978) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Horse ChestnutAesculus hippocastanum
Moffatt - Ladd House & Garden This tree was planted in 1776 when William Whipple (1730 – 1785) returned home from Philadelphia after signing The Declaration of Independence. — Map (db m105538) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Joseph & Nancy (Cotton) and their children, Eleazor & JamesPortsmouth Black Heritage Trail
In 1717 Portsmouth's first identified black family was baptised by South Church. Baptisms of enslaved people became more frequent in local churches; black marriages, however, were not included in town records until the Revolutionary Era, when . . . — Map (db m115979) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Liberty Pole and Bridge
Legend Records "Liberty, Property & no Stamps" on a flag flown on the first Portsmouth Liberty Pole in January 1766, in response to British attempts to tax products without American representation in Parliament, the Portsmouth Sons of Liberty . . . — Map (db m76579) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Oracle HouseCirca 1702
The Oracle House is one of the oldest houses in New England. it was built by the Honorable Richard Wibird, an officer in the British Royal Navy, wealthy merchant, member of The King's Council and a benefactor of Harvard College. — Map (db m23380) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Point of Graves
This cemetery was formally established in 1671 on land given to the town by Captain John Pickering. The land was used for burials prior to this time, but because Pickering retained the right to graze his cattle here, many of the earliest . . . — Map (db m76582) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — Site of "Negro Burying Ground"Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail
In colonial Portsmouth, segregation applied in death as in life. City officials approved a plan in 1705 that set aside this city block for a "Negro Burying Ground." It was close to town, but pushed to what was then its outer edge. By 1813, houses . . . — Map (db m115977) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Portsmouth — The Original New Hampshire State House
Located in Market Square Seat of Colonial Government, 1758 - 1776 The Declaration of Independence was read from the Building, July 18, 1776 President George Washington spoke from the Balcony, October 31, 1789 — Map (db m76461) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Rye — 018 — Isles Of Shoals
About six miles offshore, these nine rocky islands served Europeans as a fishing station before the first mainland settlements were made in 1623. Capt John Smith (1580-1631) named the group "Smiths Isles" in 1614. The codfish that "shoaled" or . . . — Map (db m74581) HM
New Hampshire (Rockingham County), Seabrook — 103 — Shapley Line
Based on the 1640 southern boundary of Bachiler's farm, it was surveyed by Capt. Nicholas Shapley in 1657, dividing the Province of New Hampshire from the Massachusetts Bay Colony 1689-1741. In 1662 three Quaker women, being banished from the . . . — Map (db m115419) HM
New Hampshire (Strafford County), Durham — 89 — Major General John Sullivan1740-1795
Revolutionary patriot, soldier, politician, first Grand Master of Masons in New Hampshire, and a resident of Durham. He left the Continental Congress to serve under Washington from Cambridge to Valley Forge. Commanded at Rhode Island in 1778, and . . . — Map (db m96438) HM
New Hampshire (Strafford County), Durham — Major General John Sullivan Memorial
Plaque The plaque commemorates the 200th anniversary of the first organized fight of the Revolution and the transport by gundalow of gunpowder taken from the British at Fort William and Mary in New Castle on Dec. 14, 1774, concealed at this . . . — Map (db m96441) HM
New Hampshire (Strafford County), New Durham — New Durham Meeting House
The New Durham Meetinghouse was built by settlers from Durham and nearby towns in 1770 as their house of worship and seat of government until 1819 when the town's first church was built. This area was the town center until the 1850's when the . . . — Map (db m96748) HM
New Hampshire (Sullivan County), Charlestown — Liberty Tree Memorial
Front Panel This American Liberty Elm was named after "The Liberty Tree: Our Country's first Symbol of Freedom." On the morning of August 14, 1765, the people of Boston awakened to discover two effigies suspended from an elm tree in protest . . . — Map (db m66280) HM
New Hampshire (Sullivan County), North Charlestown — North Charlestown Village
Est. 1740 National Register District — Map (db m65799) HM

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Apr. 8, 2020