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Berkeley County West Virginia Historical Markers

 
"Morgan Acres" Marker next to Morgan Morgan marker. image, Touch for more information
By Forest McDermott, July 11, 2012
"Morgan Acres" Marker next to Morgan Morgan marker.
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — "Morgan Acres"
Two miles west is the site of the first house in present West Virginia. It was built by Col. Morgan Morgan who came from Delaware in 1726. It was destroyed and the one now there was built in 1800 by another Morgan. — Map (db m57717) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Christ Church
First Episcopal Church in West Virginia Established 1740 by Col. Morgan Morgan known as Morgan's Chapel Present building 1851 — Map (db m12848) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Col. Morgan Morgan
Nov. 1, 1688 — Nov. 17, 1766. Erected by the State of West Virginia. In commemoration of the first settlement within the present boundaries of said State, which was made by Col. Morgan Morgan, a native of Wales, and Catherine Garretson, . . . — Map (db m1169) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — James Johnston Pettigrew Monument
Due west of this tablet, 650 feet, is the Boyd House in which died, July 17, 1863, Brig.-Gen. James Johnston Pettigrew, of North Carolina, C. S. A. At Gettysburg he commanded and led Heth’s Division in the assault on Cemetery Ridge, July 3; and in . . . — Map (db m2615) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Jefferson County / Berkeley County
Jefferson County. Formed, 1801, from Berkeley. Named for Thomas Jefferson. Home of Gens. Gates, Darke, and Charles Lee. Here four companies of Washington’s men organized. Shepherdstown was strongly urged as the seat of the National Capitol. . . . — Map (db m3449) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Morgan Cabin
Originally built 1731-34 as second home of Morgan Morgan-first white settler in West Virginia. Rebuilt with some of original logs in 1976 as a State and County Bicentennial project. It was here during the Revolution that James Morgan, the grandson . . . — Map (db m12798) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Bunker Hill — Morgan Morgan
Morgan Morgan, a native of Wales, established his home at Bunker Hill before 1732, and was leader in Eastern Panhandle’s early development. His sons gave name to Morgantown, and fought in Indian and Revolutionary Wars. — Map (db m1176) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Darkesville — Darkesville
Named for Gen. William Darke, veteran of the Revolution and the Indian wars. He saves the remnants of St. Clair’s army from massacre in 1791 when badly defeated by the Miami Indians. His son Capt. Joseph Darke, lost his life. — Map (db m1979) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m60605) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersStuart’s Surprise
Here at Stumpy’s Hollow on the morning of July 2, 1861, Confederate Lieutenant Colonel J.E.B. Stuart captured a Union infantry company almost single-handedly. The Federals – Company I, fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers – were acting as . . . — Map (db m45596) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersCrockett-Porterfield House
On the morning of July 2, 1861, Federal troops under General Robert Patterson crossed the Potomac River from Maryland and marched toward Martinsburg. Confederate Colonel Thomas J. Jackson’s command marched from Camp Stephens, four miles north of . . . — Map (db m45605) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersHarper’s 5th Virginia Infantry
On the morning of July 2, 1861, Federal troops under General Robert Patterson crossed the Potomac River from Maryland and marched toward Martinsburg. Confederate Colonel Thomas J. Jackson’s command marched from Camp Stephens, four miles north of . . . — Map (db m58078) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battle of Falling WatersFour Apostles of the 1st Rockbridge Artillery
On the morning of July 2, 1861, Federal troops under General Robert Patterson crossed the Potomac River from Maryland and marched toward Martinsburg. Confederate Colonel Thomas J. Jackson’s command marched from Camp Stephens, four miles north of . . . — Map (db m58080) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Battles of Falling Waters“A splendid falls”
During the Civil War, the strategically important Valley Turnpike crossed the stream just above the small waterfall here. Two battles were fought nearby. The first occurred on July 2, 1861, half a mile south on the Porterfield Farm. On the morning . . . — Map (db m58083) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Falling Waters — Stumpy’s HollowJuly 2, 1861
Site of JEB Stuart’s capture of Union Soldiers Falling Waters Battlefield Association — Map (db m45769) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Gerrardstown — Gerard House
Built by John Hays, 1743. Became home of Reverend David Gerard, who founded Gerrardstown in 1787. His father was Reverend John Gerard, the first Baptist Minister west of the Blue Ridge Mountains. — Map (db m12793) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Gerrardstown — Gerrardstown
Established as a town, 1787. Named for John Gerrard, first pastor of Mill Creek Baptist Church, which was organized by early settlers about 1743. The congregation reorganized after Indian hostilities during the French and Indian War. — Map (db m12791) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Gerrardstown — Mill Creek Baptist Church
Site of Mill Creek Baptist Church Organized prior to 1742 Grand-parent of First Baptist Church Martinsburg, West Va. — Map (db m14596) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Battle of North Mountain Depot
This boulder marks the site on Camp Hill where the batteries were fired during the War Between the States in the raid on the federal blockhouse, located at North Mountain. On July 4, 1864, the 14th, 16th, and 17th Regiments of General McCausland's . . . — Map (db m117317) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Camp HopkinsMemorial to a Friend
In December 1862, Union Gen. Benjamin F. Kelley stationed detachments of the 54th Pennsylvania and 1st West Virginia Infantry regiments here to guard and repair the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, a main supply route between the Ohio River and the . . . — Map (db m58628) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Hedgesville
Site of stockade fort built during the early Indian wars. Mt. Zion Episcopal Church was built soon after. A mile west is the tavern, built, 1740–1750, by Robert Snodgrass on land patented in 1732 by William Snodgrass, pioneer settler. — Map (db m990) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Hedgesville — Hedgesville Historic District National Register SiteWashington Heritage Trail
During the French and Indian War (c. 1750) Virginia Militia Col. George Washington supervised the construction of Fort Hedges, a stockade fort built along the Warm Spring Road at the heavily-traveled Skinner's gap atop North Mountain (740 feet . . . — Map (db m117316) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — “Oh Shenandoah, I Long to See You!”
“Big Apple Time Capsule” • Dedicated: Oct 19, 1990 – Re-open in year of 2040 • Sponsor: Martinsburg Jaycees. This “community pride project” is an attempt to preserve the Apple Capital city and surrounding areas of . . . — Map (db m1212) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Avenue of Flags Monument
The colonial village of Martinsburg was established by law enacted by the General Assemply of the Commonwealth of Virginia on October 21, 1778. Martinsburg’s founder was General Adam Stephen, a noted soldier of the American Revolutionary War. . . . — Map (db m1978) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Shop Complex
The roundhouse is the sole surviving cast-iron framed roundhouse and is an important example of mid-19th century industrial building design. Designed by Albert Fink, in collaboration with Benjamin H. Latrobe, it represents an early use of . . . — Map (db m1199) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Baltimore and Ohio Roundhouse and Shop Complex
National Civil Engineering Landmark. The re-construction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Roundhouse and Shop Complex commenced soon after the end of the American Civil War in 1865. This complex included two roundhouses and two significant . . . — Map (db m17373) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Battle of Falling WatersJackson’s Coolness Under Fire
On the morning of July 2, 1861, Federal troops under Gen. Robert Patterson crossed the Potomac River from Maryland and marched south toward Martinsburg. Colonel Thomas J. Jackson sent his men north from their camp north of town to block them and to . . . — Map (db m41631) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Belle Boyd House126 E. Race Street — Built 1853
Built in 1853 by Benjamin Reed Boyd, a merchant, Confederate soldier and the father of Belle Boyd. Belle Boyd was a famous Confederate spy author and actress. — Map (db m45854) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Belle Boyd HouseHome of a Spy — Antietam Campaign
Isabelle “Belle” Boyd, the Confederate spy, lived here during part of her childhood. The ten-year-old and her family moved here in 1853 and left in 1858 for a dwelling (no longer standing) on South Queen Street. According to Boyd, when . . . — Map (db m63496) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Berkeley HotelRailroad Raids Survivor
This is one of the last surviving antebellum buildings in the area. It was constructed shortly after the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad reached Martinsburg in 1842. The adjacent railroad yards twice were Confederate Gen. Thomas J. . . . — Map (db m58629) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Boydville
Built, 1812, by Elisha Boyd, general in the War of 1812, on land bought from Gen. Adam Stephen. Mansion noted for its fine workmanship. Home of his son-in-law, Charles J. Faulkner, Minister to France, and his grandson, U.S. Senator Faulkner. — Map (db m983) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Civil War MartinsburgFocus of Contention
Martinsburg, strategically located on the Valley Turnpike, (present day U.S. Route 11) and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, was a major transportation center and the northern gateway to the Shenandoah Valley. Both sides contested for it frequently . . . — Map (db m88507) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Fort Neally
During the French and Indian War, Fort Neally was captured and its garrison massacred, Sept. 17, 1756. Many settlers in the vicinity also were killed. Among captives was Isabella Stockton, later wife of William McCleery, Morgantown. — Map (db m12790) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Gen. Adam Stephen
Here was home of General Adam Stephen, founder of Martinsburg and county's first sheriff. Was famous as fighter in French and Indian Wars, and as major general in the American Revolutionary War. — Map (db m12786) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — General “Stonewall” Jackson
In Memory of General “Stonewall” Jackson This tablet is erected by the Berkeley County Chapter United Daughters of the Confederacy to commemorate an instance of General Jackson’s remarkable bravery at all times in the face of the gravest . . . — Map (db m41626) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — General Adam Stephen House and Triple Brick Museum
Founder of Martinsburg, First Sheriff of Berkeley County, Statesman, Soldier, Surgeon National Register of Historic Places Oct. 15, 1970 — Map (db m12788) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m1975) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Hammond HouseHeadquarters and Hospital
Dr. Allen C. Hammond constructed this Greek Revival-style house about 1838. During the Civil War, both sides used it periodically for a headquarters or a hospital. The war ruined Hammond, a strong Southern sympathizer. In October 1859, Hammond’s . . . — Map (db m72164) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — J. R. Clifford
Born 1848 in Hardy Co. A Civil War vet., Storer College graduate, teacher and principal at local Sumner School. Published Pioneer Press (1882), first African American paper in state. First of race to pass state bar exam (1887); argued two . . . — Map (db m1210) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Martinsburg
Founded, 1778, by Gen. Adam Stephen. Named for Thomas Martin, nephew of Lord Fairfax. Home of Admirals Charles Boarman and C.K. Stribling. Locomotives seized here, 1861, in Jackson’s raid were drawn by horses to Winchester, Va. — Map (db m1973) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Martinsburg / Berkeley Riflemen
Martinsburg. Established, 1778, by Gen. Adam Stephen. Named for Col. Thomas Martin, nephew of Lord Fairfax. Home of Admiral C.K. Stribling and Admiral Charles Boarman. In Jackson’s raid, 1861, captured B&O locomotives were drawn by horses to . . . — Map (db m1976) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Martinsburg RoundhouseJackson and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad — Antietam Campaign
In April 1861, as the Civil War erupted, Confederate forces seized the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from Harpers Ferry west. On May 24, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston ordered Col. Thomas J. (later “Stonewall”) Jackson to destroy the rolling . . . — Map (db m1200) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Old Federal Building
125 S. Maple Avenue. Completed 1895. Constructed using the Richardson-Romanesque Style of architecture, this building served as a Post Office and United States Courthouse. — Map (db m1977) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Roundhouses and Shops / Railroad Strike of 1877
Roundhouses and Shops. The B&O Railroad reached Martinsburg in 1842, and by 1849, a roundhouse and shops were built. These first buildings were burned by Confederate troops in 1862. The present west roundhouse and the two shops were built . . . — Map (db m1197) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Site of Belle Boyd Home
Famous Confederate Spy. Here on July 4, 1861, Belle Boyd, at the age of 17, shot and killed a Union soldier. She was imprisoned on several occasions as a result of her later spying activities. — Map (db m982) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Sumner-Ramer Memorial School515 West Martin Street
The present building was completed in 1917 under the leadership of Fred R. Ramer. He was the first principal in Berkeley County to have a school named after him. Ramer school served the black community until 1964. — Map (db m1211) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Van Metre Ford Bridge
Named for the property owners this stone bridge built in 1832 across Opequon Creek was major improvement for travellers on Warm Springs Road connecting Alexandria and Bath, Va., site of famous mineral waters. The Berkeley County Court established a . . . — Map (db m12849) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Veterans Administration Center
Established as the Newton D. Baker General Hospital, U.S. Army. Named for Newton D. Baker, native of Martinsburg and Secretary of War, World War I. Opened for patients in 1944. It became Veterans Administration Center in 1946. — Map (db m12784) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — World War Memorial
1917-1918. This memorial is dedicated as an enduring tribute to the patriotism of the citizens of Berkeley County who rendered loyal service to our country in the great World War, and to honor the memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice . . . — Map (db m1256) WM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsville — Swan Pond Manor
1.5 miles north is Swan Pond Manor, a 2,000 acre retreat set aside in 1745 for use by Thomas, Lord Fairfax, once the proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia who established an estate at Greenway Court, Frederick County in 1738. So named because . . . — Map (db m92579) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Nollville — Tuscarora Church
Tuscarora Presbyterian Church, which was built before 1745 by Scotch-Irish Presbyterians. Rev. Hugh Vance, first pastor, is buried here. During Indian days, worshipers hung their guns on pegs in the walls while they sang and prayed. — Map (db m92578) HM

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